Volitility on the USD.

Discussion in 'Bullion Investing' started by Stanley Bass, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    Wait, what? o_O
     
  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. Sullysullinburg

    Sullysullinburg Well-Known Member

    5F85255C-F298-4F4B-9CDB-ABE37BE37530.png
     
  4. Zeppo Shanski

    Zeppo Shanski Active Member

    A SINE curve ... not sin.

    A sine wave or sinusoid is a mathematical curve that describes a smooth periodic oscillation. A sine wave is a continuous wave. It is named after the function sine, of which it is the graph. It occurs often in pure and applied mathematics, as well as physics, engineering, signal processing and many other fields. Its most basic form as a function of time (t) is:

    {\displaystyle y(t)=A\sin(2\pi ft+\varphi )=A\sin(\omega t+\varphi )}[​IMG]
    where:

    • A = the amplitude, the peak deviation of the function from zero.
    • f = the ordinary frequency, the number of oscillations (cycles) that occur each second of time.
    • ω = 2πf, the angular frequency, the rate of change of the function argument in units of radians per second
    • {\displaystyle \varphi }[​IMG] = the phase, specifies (in radians) where in its cycle the oscillation is at t = 0.
      • When {\displaystyle \varphi }[​IMG] is non-zero, the entire waveform appears to be shifted in time by the amount {\displaystyle \varphi }[​IMG]/ω seconds. A negative value represents a delay, and a positive value represents an advance.
    The oscillation of an undamped spring-mass system around the equilibrium is a sine wave
    The sine wave is important in physics because it retains its wave shape when added to another sine wave of the same frequency and arbitrary phase and magnitude. It is the only periodic waveform that has this property. This property leads to its importance in Fourier analysis and makes it acoustically unique.
     
  5. Sullysullinburg

    Sullysullinburg Well-Known Member

    Oops. Spelling is not my strong point, but I’ll let auto correct take the fall here (but it was proabably me).
     
    Cheech9712 and Zeppo Shanski like this.
  6. Zeppo Shanski

    Zeppo Shanski Active Member

    Protected by a 109,000-acre U.S. Army post in Kentucky sits one of the Federal Reserve's most secure assets and its only gold depository: the 73-year-old Fort Knox vault.

    According to the U.S. Mint, there are currently 147.3 million ounces of gold in Fort Knox, KY. At an example price of about +/- $1,350 per ounce, this is worth give or take $198.86 billion dollars.
     
  7. Zeppo Shanski

    Zeppo Shanski Active Member

    Sullysullinburg ... NO problemmo. I'm a retired math (and other stuff) teacher. I was having fun with that.
     
  8. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    Yup, the mortgage industry was rife of shenanigans back then.

    In addition to highly leveraged mortgages, those high flying mortgage companies started selling "Interest Only" mortgages pushing certain demographics ppl to those mortgages. Talk about lack of sustainability.
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/mone...edit-dotcom-interest-only-mortgages/30168323/

    Oddly, unlike the above article, I know some ppl that have interest only loans today, from just a few years ago. So they are selling those to not only the rich, but also the ppl that should be renting instead of buying (if you want to call it that). If you miss/late for a payment you are now upside down on the loan without even paying any principal .. and you hope the property valuation goes up.

    The mortgage industry loves to use future income potential in their calculations as they expand their business to drive revenue no matter the risk. It's up to the consumer to be educated and willing or not-willing to go for these types of debt capitalization.
     
  9. mpcusa

    mpcusa "Official C.T. TROLL SWEEPER"

    Maybe we can buy tickets and go inside and check...LOL
     
  10. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    Oh, I know perfectly well what a sine wave looks like. I bought my second oscilloscope when I was about your age. :)

    What I'm balking at is the notion that the market is periodic, or predictable -- except in hindsight, which isn't really "prediction".
     
    JPeace$ likes this.
  11. Zeppo Shanski

    Zeppo Shanski Active Member

    It is very predictable considering certain situations.

    I PREDICT ...
    1) If the interest rates change it will have an effect on the market.
    B] If the unemployment levels change it will have an effect on the market.
    *} If the president says or does something it will have an effect on the market.

    The market is usually very predictable based on situations like this.

    Ask any of these people and they'll tell you all about it.
    Ivan Boesky, Rune Brynhildsen, Doug DeCinces, Du Jun, Rajat Gupta, Ian Hannam, Simon Hannes, Bill Keller, Mychal Kendricks, Dennis Levine, Mathew Martoma, Yoshiaki Murakami, Joseph Nacchio, David Pajčin, Eugene Plotkin, Raj Rajaratnam, Byrraju Ramalinga Raju, Rene Rivkin, Jeffrey Skilling, George Soros, Marylin Star, Yoshiaki Tsutsumi, Samuel D. Waksal, R. Foster Winans
     
  12. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member


    Jeffrey Skilling, Ivan Boesky, et all .... hahaha
     
  13. Sullysullinburg

    Sullysullinburg Well-Known Member

    It is predictable but at the same time it isn’t. Eventually a peak is reached and from there the market drops until a recovery starts and it goes back up. I can’t tell you when these things will happen, or how long they will last, but they will occur.
     
  14. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    So essentially you're saying the market won't go up forever without a drop, or fall forever without a rise, or stay absolutely constant. Really going out on a limb there... :rolleyes:
     
  15. rte

    rte Well-Known Member

    :D:D:D
    Where's the poll?
    I'd wager 95+% of the people on this site could guess correctly between Fort Knox being empty or gold painted wall paper.
     
  16. rte

    rte Well-Known Member

    The very fact that the .Gov will not let anyone in to photograph the contents.
     
  17. mpcusa

    mpcusa "Official C.T. TROLL SWEEPER"

    The problem is, that you cant verify it and they wont let you ! the last
    Audit was years ago, maybe its time for another, i elect myself to check
    ...LOL
     
  18. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    Maybe they prefer security over public tours.
    I can't see the Moon Landing stuff with my binoculars ... maybe that didn't exist either?
    https://moneyversed.com/secrets-of-fort-knox/


    An Audit/ Inspection is as rare as a Totality Solar Eclipse ... oops
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/18/politics/steve-mnuchin-flights/index.html
    https://www.coinworld.com/news/us-c...cretary-pays-visit-to-fort-knox-gold.all.html

    see above new articles of some ppl who were last in there just a couple years ago.

    upload_2019-2-4_15-11-48.png
    https://www.apnews.com/d0e1efce41bb42ba9cdf1f34dc3f7e5c
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  19. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    But I insist 436 angels can dance on the head of a pin...
     
  20. Zeppo Shanski

    Zeppo Shanski Active Member

    According to the U.S. Mint, there are currently 147.3 million ounces of gold in Fort Knox, KY. At an example price of about +/- $1,350 per ounce, this is worth give or take $198.86 billion dollars.
     
  21. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page