Private mint bullion that knocks off Government issues

Discussion in 'Bullion Investing' started by myownprivy, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. myownprivy

    myownprivy Active Member

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  3. furryfrog02

    furryfrog02 Well-Known Member

    I own the legit UK one...gotta say, the "knock off" that doesn't have QEII's face on it looks better ;)
     
  4. longnine009

    longnine009 Hammer of the gods

    Thanks! I think I'll order the round. I'm tired of looking at the queen.
     
  5. Santinidollar

    Santinidollar Supporter! Supporter

    Notice that Provident didn’t post a buyback price for the knockoff.
     
  6. myownprivy

    myownprivy Active Member

    I wonder if the queen's effigy is a protected image and that's why it wasn't duplicated. Does anyone know?
     
  7. longnine009

    longnine009 Hammer of the gods

    Most likely she's not on the round because she was never on the original British trade dollar. It does not appear that any monarch was on them. What is shown on the first link is very similar to what the wiki image shows.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trade_dollar
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2018
  8. myownprivy

    myownprivy Active Member

    I'm curious when something becomes a counterfeit. Does the inclusion of the queen represent a replica that is close enough to real money that it would be considered illegal? (Even though, yes, I see the original trade dollar didn't feature any monarch on it)
     
  9. longnine009

    longnine009 Hammer of the gods

    I don't see how it can be called a counterfeit coin if there is no denomination on it.
     
  10. myownprivy

    myownprivy Active Member

    Right. Not this specifically, but coins and bullion in general.
    Have you also noticed that in legal knock offs and replicas that the queen is never present? I am curious if this is because doing so would constitute a counterfeit.
     
  11. longnine009

    longnine009 Hammer of the gods

    Most knockoffs are rounds. Rounds cannot be called coins if they do not have a denomination on them so they cannot be called counterfeit coins.

    An imitation coin, one that has all the features of an actual coin but is a replica, has to be marked COPY. Replica coins, including coins featuring the queen, are not illegal so long as they are marked COPY in letters that are the correct height.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2018
  12. myownprivy

    myownprivy Active Member

  13. longnine009

    longnine009 Hammer of the gods

    I don't see what mint struck the coin. Was it one of those lava rocks in the middle of the Pacific Ocean? If so they're probably authorized to do so.
     
  14. longnine009

    longnine009 Hammer of the gods

    Niue struck the Scrooge McDuck two pound coin featuring Scrooge McDuck (owned by Disney) on one side and the Queen on the other side.
     
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