Coin Talk Memeber Test: Silver Polish And Tarnish Remover

Discussion in 'Bullion Investing' started by mpcusa, Aug 7, 2017.

  1. mpcusa

    mpcusa "You break it you buy it" Supporter

    Your secret is safe with me..LOL
     
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  3. green18

    green18 Sweet on Commemorative Coins Supporter

    Well, I have heard that bullion collectors love 'bast white' and such, so if you want to go this route, it's all up to you. I, on the other hand, wouldn't apply anything stronger than pure acetone to any of my silver objects.
     
  4. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    I'm not above a dip every now and then, and don't find too much wrong about the washing soda/Aluminum treatment. It all depends on how you prepare the surface and how you clean and protect it after treatment. (IMHO)
     
  5. green18

    green18 Sweet on Commemorative Coins Supporter

    I never much was one for appearances.......
     
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  6. tommyc03

    tommyc03 Senior Member

    I've used it on silver plate items for years but the tarnishing always comes back no matter how well I keep anything stored, therefore repeat and rinse, repeat and rinse. Eventually the silver plate will wear doing this over and over again. I'm not going to try it on my bullion. But these are yours and of course you can do anything that you want, won't take that away from you or criticize you for it. If (my) bullion tarnishes I'll leave it alone. For me it is just bullion.
     
  7. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    Actually I just won a 1/2 oz proof Libertad that looks milky in the pictures and I fully intend to dip it. I'll try and document it.
     
  8. mpcusa

    mpcusa "You break it you buy it" Supporter

    I agree it,s just bullion but i still have to look at it...LOL
     
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  9. Johndoe2000$

    Johndoe2000$ RE-MEMBER

    I'm no expert, and don't know what long-term harm, if any, it would cause, but for bullion bars as you've shown why not? They do look shiny after. :) And they are yours so you can do whatever you want. I obviously wouldn't advise using on any numismatic, or even collectable bullion due to the hairline scratches from the cloth, or whatever you use.
     
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  10. ocjoe949

    ocjoe949 Active Member

    On a side note I have the same bar. Love casino silver. I enjoy that casino for that matter. :happy:
     
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  11. rte

    rte Active Member

    I've dipped a few using eZest.
    Even taken a Q-tip to a couple stubborn tarnished spots.

    Others I leave be.
    uss 3.jpg
     
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  12. mpcusa

    mpcusa "You break it you buy it" Supporter

    I am trying to figure out, why there would have to be any long term damage ?
    Or what that would even be ? all I can say it does a great job, from the example
    I posted, also will be using it on a couple other non pre packaged bars that I have
    Also FYI, I did take a high power loop and examined the bar with no such scratches
    Observed, again we are only taking about a small amount of cream on a polishing cloth and just a couple of passes, and for the paranoid...LOL, would probably not
    Use this product on anything they would be overly concerned with.
     
  13. mpcusa

    mpcusa "You break it you buy it" Supporter

    It does take awhile for tarnish and toning to show up, but it also depends on
    The climate you live in, I live in Las Vegas so it is very dry, so maybe polish
    Once a year if that, to keep things looking good :)

    I do agree with most of what you said however I did sell a $100 4oz Silver
    Plate, that I could of got over spot for if I would have new in advance before
    I sold it and the tarnish removed ( basically could have resold it, in the store)
    But because of the tarnish it was sent strait to the refiners.
     
  14. mpcusa

    mpcusa "You break it you buy it" Supporter

    Can you post a pic, would love to see another example :)
     
  15. mikenoodle

    mikenoodle The Village Idiot

    How is it possible for something to oxidize in an air-tight environment?
     
  16. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    No scratches from the cloth, scratches from the abrasive in the cleaner (silica) or from grit on the object being pushed around by the cloth.
     
  17. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    The thought is that if you leave any of the cleaning material on the object, time will allow it to react with the object.
     
  18. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    If there is such a thing as an air-tight environment.
     
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  19. mikenoodle

    mikenoodle The Village Idiot

    there is... it's called a vacuum.
     
  20. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    natura abhorret a vacuo

    nature.jpg
     
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  21. Johndoe2000$

    Johndoe2000$ RE-MEMBER

    You say it's the compounds/cleaning products that cause the scratches, but I'm pretty sure that rubbing silver, as well as other metals, with any cloth can, and does produce hairline scratches. Please correct me if wrong. Using the cloth with no compounds would leave hairlines is my understanding.
     
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