Wt ? Heck is this ?

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by Chris Skaggs, Mar 31, 2020.

  1. Chris Skaggs

    Chris Skaggs Skaggszy98

    Looks like a quarter but the weight is 5.2 g ? I'm stumped !?! Any suggestions are welcome.

    Kind regards , Chris
     

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  3. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    Both sides and magnified if possible
     
  4. Idries Pappas

    Idries Pappas Well-Known Member

    Did you weigh another coin to make sure your scale is properly calibrated?
     
  5. Chris Skaggs

    Chris Skaggs Skaggszy98

    Hopefully that works can put it under my coin micro if not ?
    Thanks
     
  6. Chris Skaggs

    Chris Skaggs Skaggszy98

    Yeah I've been weighing coins for a while and the scale is brand new
     
  7. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    The pictures are too small but looks like it was dug out of the ground at some time as the ground acid would wear away at the metal and copper. Thus would weigh less than a more pristine copy.

    Remember coins are made of metal just like an old car body rusting away in a field.

    All more commonly generically known as Environmental Damage.
    Screenshot_2020-03-31-23-28-08~2.png
     
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  8. Razz

    Razz Critical Thinker

    So spec on that quarter is 5.67 grams with a tolerance of 0.227gr. So 5.443gr is the low weight. Yours is below that so could be environmental damage... Polish_20200331_203350062.jpg
     
  9. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Just Enviromental Damage. It is an old quarter exposed to the elements. I have seen thousands just like yours when in my Metal Detecting finds.
     
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  10. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    What type of areas do you generally find the better coins?
     
  11. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    In the grass.. Fresh drops. Maybe there for a few days. For example. I can detect a certain grassy field and find nothing. A week later I go to the exact same area and find like $2.00 in Quarters, Nickels and Dimes and maybe also a ring.
    Happens a lot. Those coins would not suffer Environmental Damage in a short period of time.
    But coins that are buried for years get bad.
    Here are examples from my finds that were buried deep -
    20190519_144911-1.jpg 20190519_144934-1.jpg 20190519_144744-1.jpg 20190519_144806-1.jpg 20190519_144614-1.jpg 20190519_144632-1.jpg 20190504_174319-1.jpg 20190316_113034-1.jpg 20171224_140434.jpg KenObv.jpg
     
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  12. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    It sure doesn't take long for the process to begin.
    Thanks.
     
  13. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Actually.. I think it does. You need a few years for the Cupro-Nickel to tone to a darker color from what I have seen in my 10 years experience in Metal Detecting.
     
  14. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    This is not a jab. I'm learning quickly to specifically state my comments. What I meant by the word long was, after a few years the corrosion really becomes apparent.
     
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  15. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    The solubility of metals increases as soil Ph decreases.
    So the eating away of the metal will vary from location to location. This excludes wear such as if it was found at a beach after long exposure.

    I believe copper gets affected greatly with Ph levels below 6. I'd have to try to find some info on cupronickel alloys but I would guess lower than copper.
     
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