World silver crown-size type coin collectors?

Discussion in 'World Coins' started by Ag76, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. Muzyck

    Muzyck I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a buscuit today.

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  3. Muzyck

    Muzyck I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a buscuit today.

    This one is about 27g, 40mm

    Annam 7 Tien 1834 obverse.jpg
    Annam 7 Tien 1834 reverse.jpg
     
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  4. Mat

    Mat Ancient Coincoholic

    That's a beauty!
     
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  5. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    That is a set I am working on too - the forerunner of the modern Euro. I am also doing the 20-unit pieces (0.1867 oz. AGW) in gold - they are so close to spot. I have many in AU+. The eastern European countries (Bulgaria, Romania, Greece) are hard to find. Coins circulated in poor countries.
     
  6. onecenter

    onecenter Member

    Lots of nice big pieces of silver in this thread. I recently acquired a set of six of Uganda's 1969 silver proof coins for Pope Paul VI's visit. For some reason, I thought the coins would be smaller in size, why I do not know. It was an extremely pleasant surprise to find the largest coin, the 30-shilling silver piece, come in at 60mm in diameter. Now that is a nice chuck of silver!
     
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  7. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    That usually showed that they were in the Latin Monetary Union (LMU) from 1865-1914, or were following its standards. The 5-unit pieces had to have 25 grams of .900 fine silver, abd the 2-unit to 20-cents had to be a fractional weight in .835 silver. They had gold rules too. The only country that broke the rules was the Vatican, so they got kicked out around 1870.
     
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  8. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    This is one of my favorite crowns. I like that it show 5 small crowns, which is the denomination (5 Coronas). 1900 Aus5cor.jpeg.jpg
     
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  9. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    Another work of art: 1880 Belg5fr.jpg
     
  10. kazuma78

    kazuma78 Well-Known Member

    That's a great coin! Where did you find it?
     
  11. princeofwaldo

    princeofwaldo Grateful To Be eX-I/T!

  12. Ag76

    Ag76 25 years later and they pulled me back in

    What is it? I believe I've seen it before, but I can't read the characters.
     
  13. Ag76

    Ag76 25 years later and they pulled me back in

    I knew some of that history, but thanks for the further explanation. It's a bit surprising that Latin American states would be so eager to sign onto a European standard, but then, the move from bimetallism to gold convertibility was also a European innovation. I guess it was seen as very helpful for international trade.

    Another aspect of 19th and early 20th century coinage I find interesting is the coinage rights of member governments of federations. The German and Austro-Hungarian Empires allowed their constituent parts to issue gold and silver coins in certain denominations, but Canada and the U.S. did not. In the last case, the constitutional framers banned state coinage and paper money issuance because they were worried about debasement. But U.S. law permitted *private* coinage without problems, as well as free private bank note issue (with, occasionally, lots of problems). In the 20th century, colonial dependencies usually obtained rights of coinage, which they eventually commercialized for the collector market. Again, an area where the politics are fascinating.
     
  14. Muzyck

    Muzyck I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a buscuit today.

    Vietnam 7 Tien. It reads Minh Mang Thong Bao. The year 15 is under the dragon. Minh Mang was Emporor from 1820 to 1841. Year 15 dates the coin at 1834.
     
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  15. princeofwaldo

    princeofwaldo Grateful To Be eX-I/T!

    That's a great coin! Where did you find it?[/QUOTE]
    Purchased at the Chicago International Coin Fair (CICF) in 2012 from Jonathan Kern. Was a memorable trip, took Megabus from Kansas City to Chicago, then the L from downtown out to the show. Gasoline was over $4 a gallon at the time. It's probably lost some value since then, but nothing like the crash in Italian gold issues from the period.
     
  16. princeofwaldo

    princeofwaldo Grateful To Be eX-I/T!

    Okay, another crown...,,.. Once again pretty common but a great design.

    ger1901a.jpg ger1901b.jpg
     
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  17. Ag76

    Ag76 25 years later and they pulled me back in

    These 50 schilling coins are listed by Numista as "non-circulating," but according to what Austrian collectors have said, they were available from banks at face value and did circulate to a limited extent, so I've decided to make them eligible for my collection.
    austria50s1973o.jpg austria50s1973r.jpg
     
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  18. coin_nut

    coin_nut Supporter! Supporter

    I have one part of my collection called "Big Silver", and I guess most of those coins could be called world crowns.

    1834 FR-W 5 f obv.JPG 1834 FR-W 5 f rev.JPG 1869 FR-BB 5 f obv.JPG 1869 FR-BB 5 f rev.JPG 1870 NL 2 1-2 g obv.JPG 1870 NL 2 1-2 g rev.JPG 1870 FR-A 5 f obv.JPG 1870 FR-A 5 f rev.JPG
     
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  19. jgenn

    jgenn World Crown Collector

    Darn it, another scarce 19th century crown to chase!
     
  20. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    Yes, you are correct. I have a nice copper example that is listed as a pattern in copper, but is actually a 10 centime. Amazing design.
     
  21. coin_nut

    coin_nut Supporter! Supporter

    A few more big silver crown type coins 1871 BE 5 f obv.JPG 1871 BE 5 f rev.JPG 1871 ES 5 p obv.JPG 1871 ES 5 p rev.JPG 1875 FR-A 5 f obv.JPG 1875 FR-A 5 f rev.JPG 1876 NO 2 k obv.JPG 1876 NO 2 k rev.JPG 1889 ET 1 birr obv.JPG 1889 ET 1 birr rev.JPG
     
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