whats it worth 1809 Half Dollar

Discussion in 'US Coins Forum' started by COOPER12, Apr 6, 2021 at 9:00 PM.

  1. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    Trying to help a friend out the inherited some coins .
    The 1809 half dollar I do not think is the rarest .
    I realize these are not the best pics but this is what I have to work with .
    Any ideas a fair selling price he should ask? 1.jpg 2.jpg
     
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  3. micbraun

    micbraun coindiccted Supporter

    Is there an XXX pattern somewhere on the edge? It appears to be the O-102 XXX edge variety, which has a high collector’s interest.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021 at 9:13 PM
  4. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    i will ask him
     
  5. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    Straight line he said
     
  6. micbraun

    micbraun coindiccted Supporter

    Does it look like this somewhere?

    upload_2021-4-7_3-20-22.jpeg

    PS: If there’s a die crack on top of UNITED STATES then it’s the O-102a and may likely have a regular edge.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021 at 9:28 PM
  7. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

  8. okbustchaser

    okbustchaser I may be old but I still appreciate a pretty bust Supporter

    As an Overton 102 it will have the XXX edge with the xs between the words dollar and fifty--sometimes overlapping the word dollar. The marks are not clearly Xs; they are actually crude crossmarks.

    Since you asked about a fair selling price I would estimate something in the 275 to 325 range as long as the dark spots are merely toning and not corrosion.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021 at 10:03 PM
  9. micbraun

    micbraun coindiccted Supporter

    I think I can see a die crack on top of UNITED and STATES, which means it’s the O-102a - not all of those do have the crossmarks. Unfortunately the obverse picture is too blurry to confirm.
     
    C-B-D likes this.
  10. Rushmore

    Rushmore Coin Addict

    What is the point of having all these different numbers and varieties for bust halves? Seems silly to me.
     
  11. micbraun

    micbraun coindiccted Supporter

    Each obv/rev die has unique markers, it’s fairly easy to determine all die marriages for each year (Overton varieties). Some are commonly found, others are scarce or truly rare. The minting process changed when the mint transitioned to Seated coinage and it’s harder to determine varieties. That’s why Bust halves are highly popular with variety collectors.

    I’d like to add that O-102 coins are all supposed to have an XXX edge, but O-102a coins usually have a regular edge (the “a” means it’s a later die state). Collectors want the XXX coins, that’s why the die state is important in this case.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2021 at 4:17 PM
  12. Publius2

    Publius2 Well-Known Member

    There are many people that collect bust halves by die marriage. There are, I believe, over four hundred die marriages and some of them cost well into five figures. They are a dedicated and some say, fanatical bunch. Many of them congregate in the "Bust Half Nut Club" which is very exclusive and has strict criteria for joining. You can't just pay your dues and you're a member. In addition, there are many people that collect other series by die marriage such as: All of the half cents, all of the large cents, every capped bust denomination, every Liberty Seated denomination, Flying Eagle and Indian Head Cents, and Morgan dollars by VAM number. I haven't even mentioned the various pre-federal coinage. Numerous clubs exist to advance the numismatic knowledge about these series, particularly as it relates to die marriages. These clubs include: Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4); Early American Coppers Club (EAC); John Reich Collectors Society (JRCS); Liberty Seated Collectors Club (LSCC); and the FlyIn Club. The members of these clubs are actively involved in the many technical and historical aspects of this coinage. Die marriage analysis has contributed greatly to our understanding of the operation of the early mints. These clubs also advance the database of counterfeits and thus help to protect all collectors.

    So to say name as silly a very large and well-heeled portion of the collecting community simply because you don't share their particular passion seems close-minded. There are many areas of numismatics that I don't collect in but I don't consider them to be in any way silly or unimportant.

    You may enjoy numismatics more thoroughly and deeply if you expose yourself to some areas that are unfamiliar to you. You may also gain more from the various exchanges on this and other forums.

    Please don't take this as a personal criticism of you. I welcome all opinions even when I don't agree with them - maybe especially then because I can usually learn something.
     
    ksparrow and micbraun like this.
  13. Rushmore

    Rushmore Coin Addict

    No offense taken. I'm not into variety and error coins and I have no problem with people that collect them. I myself collect Bust Halves have about 12 of them myself but collecting 400 varieties would be overwhelming.
     
  14. Publius2

    Publius2 Well-Known Member

    That's a fact! Two men in my local coin club are bust half collectors. The "newbie" only has about 270 varieties but the "senior" tells me he has every (or almost every) variety.
     
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