What would create toning like this?

Discussion in 'US Coins Forum' started by ldhair, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    NGC have this a 66, many years ago. I want to think they got it right but the toning on the reverse, below the eagle's body makes me wonder what I'm seeing.
    I though maybe a dip that went bad or maybe the holder the coin was stored in before NGC graded it. You can't hurt my feelings. What are your thoughts?
    2825c-70001-obv.jpg 2825c-70001-rev.jpg
     
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  3. C-B-D

    C-B-D U.S. Type Coins or death! Supporter

    To me, it looks like it came into contact with some moisture at some point. Perhaps was just handled once or twice and then spent time in a very humid enviornment.
     
    asheland likes this.
  4. Gilbert

    Gilbert Part time collector Supporter

    Humidity? Acidic air?
     
  5. Rick Stachowski

    Rick Stachowski Well-Known Member

    What the label look like on the slab .
    If it's changing colors too, then the coin was dipped before it went in the slab and the gases ( dipped ) from the coin are doing that too
    ( changing the coin color ) .
     
    352sdeer likes this.
  6. Randy Abercrombie

    Randy Abercrombie Supporter! Supporter

    I wish I could post photos on here. I felt the need for a Type One and ordered a premium piece from a reputable dealer graded MS65. And it has a similar unappealing toning around the rim. Almost appears to be a grunge. Not real happy with that purchase. I'll look forward to hearing some in the know replies on this one.
     
  7. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    Reputable dealers offer return policies as long as the coin is in the original holder. If you didn't like it, why didn't you notify the dealer that you wanted to return it for a refund?
     
  8. Randy Abercrombie

    Randy Abercrombie Supporter! Supporter

    Long story really. Short and sweet version is that I am trying to create a relationship with this particular dealer. They have a coin that haunts my dreams that I have been trying to purchase off them for a year now. Problem is, they are as attracted to the piece as I am. When they are ready to part with it, I want to be the guy they call.
     
  9. IBetASilverDollar

    IBetASilverDollar Well-Known Member

    Not sure what caused it but I like it, it's different/strange/interesting to look at. It looks like a painting
     
  10. BlackBeard_Thatch

    BlackBeard_Thatch Captain of the Queen Anne's Revenge

    Looks like a oil slick. I would not worry about it if NGC graded it straight but if you try to cross it over to PCGS or something I would not crack it and risk it being graded details. I do agree it does look like a dip or something was placed on the coin because it looks like a liquid was placed in the lower part of the reverse and it made a crescent oily toning.
     
  11. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    I'm leaning towards an incomplete rinse after a quick dip.

    It also may have been sitting in a humid environment on something that picked up moisture (the old yellow coin envelopes or cardboard).

    Just my guess
     
  12. wxcoin

    wxcoin Well-Known Member

    Looks like a dipper to me too. This is a good example to illustrate that the TPGs aren't infallible when straight grading silver coins.
     
  13. cpm9ball

    cpm9ball Cannot Re-Member

    Larry, that has got to be the ugliest SLQ I have ever seen. Send it to me right away, and I'll take care of it.

    Chris
     
    ldhair, MisterWD, Kentucky and 6 others like this.
  14. David Setree Rare Coins

    David Setree Rare Coins Well-Known Member


    Many collectors prefer white coins. That is why we dip so many of them. Silver is simply going to tarnish and it happens very quickly. A couple of years under typical conditions and it's done. It actually protects the surface from further harm.

    I would guess 99 out of 100 silver collector coins of that age that are white have been dipped. That doesn't mean 99 out of 100 coins. Most coins are left alone with some degree of protective toning. When dipped and put back in the same conditions, they start retoning immediately.
     
    wxcoin likes this.
  15. Greg M.

    Greg M. New Member

    Beautiful obverse
     
    MisterWD likes this.
  16. BooksB4Coins

    BooksB4Coins Newbieus Sempiterna

    The coin is very reminiscent of ones I once looked at that had been in a house fire. While not exposed to heat or smoke, they had been drenched in water and simply left in their albums to dry and had stayed there for some time afterwards.
     
    thomas mozzillo likes this.
  17. wxcoin

    wxcoin Well-Known Member

    It's funny how the TPGs use a different standard for dipped copper and silver coins. Although, there are straight graded dipped copper coins out there; just not the numbers as silver ones.
     
  18. GDJMSP

    GDJMSP Numismatist Moderator

    I can only assume that you are referring to the somewhat built up, thick and sharp edges of the toning in that area. To me it looks like some kind of liquid was either applied or got onto the coin by accident and it was that liquid that caused the toning to look like it does. Perhaps even caused all of the toning on the coin. But I don't think it had anything to do with a dip, or any kind of dip solution.

    You also said it was graded years ago - OK, but how many years ago ? And I'm asking because, years ago, it was rather common for some to dip away what they thought was ugly and or possibly even destructive toning, and then to apply a darkening agent, a liquid, whose sole purpose was to immediately re-tone a freshly dipped coin so that it did not look to have been freshly dipped. And it was not uncommon for such things to go wrong. Sometimes resulting in the same look that this coin has in the area you singled out.

    These darkening agents, and yes some of them are commercial products, still exist today. You can buy them any time you want. You can also make your own rather easily. But in today's world their use is but a fraction of what it used to be. Which of course kinda ties in with the "years ago".

    Is it possible I am wrong ? Of course, but it is also possible I am right. And I say that because natural toning does not result in sharp, built up edges like those seen on this coin. Nor does the removal of toning with any kind of dip solution. Both result in smooth, feathered edges to the toning.
     
    ldhair likes this.
  19. Insider

    Insider Talent on loan from...

    THIS from grandpa :hilarious::hilarious::hilarious:: "Is it possible I am wrong ? Of course, but it is also possible I am right. And I say that because natural toning does not result in sharp, built up edges like those seen on this coin. Nor does the removal of toning with any kind of dip solution. Both result in smooth, feathered edges to the toning."
     
  20. Don P

    Don P Member

    That looks similar to one of the Morgans I have where the person taped the back to put in an album. Over time, the glue wore off in certain spots but where the tape was still present, no toning.
     
  21. asheland

    asheland The Silver Lion

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