What is this kind of holder called?

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by The Trachy Enjoyer, Mar 23, 2021.

  1. The Trachy Enjoyer

    The Trachy Enjoyer Well-Known Member

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    I have been looking all over for this kind of coin holder. Every time I try and find them though, my search results are filled with thousands of 2 x 2 cardboard and plastic filps. Does this coin holder type have a specific name? Does anyone know of a seller who has them? Thanks!
     
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  3. tommyc03

    tommyc03 Senior Member

    Have you tried using the holder measurements plus "coin flip in your searches? Just a thought. I've never seen them before.
     
  4. ancient coin hunter

    ancient coin hunter Basileus Megalos

    I received an acquisition in a flip like that. Don't know where to get them though.
     
  5. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis 2 years on CT! Supporter

    Is this your coin? Can I see the reverse pwetty pwease :shame:
     
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  6. robinjojo

    robinjojo Supporter! Supporter

    The holder appears to be self-adhesive but of unusual dimensions.

    What are the dimensions?
     
  7. Inspector43

    Inspector43 73 Year Collector Supporter

    Amos Advantage - Coin World 2x2 - Half Dollar (100-Pack)
    This is where I buy them. These are for half dollar coins, but they have all sizes. With these the sides are stapled. Then flatten the stables with a pliers to keep them from damaging other coins. I don't like the self stick because you have to destroy the holder to view or photo the coin.
     
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  8. Theodosius

    Theodosius Fine Style Seeker Supporter

    Look closer, it is not a 2x2...

    More like a 2x3.

    :)
     
  9. Justin Lee

    Justin Lee I learn by doing Supporter

    To me it doesn't look like a flip of any sort, but rather a thick cardboard-esque rectangle with a circular area removed for the coin to sit inside. I'm not sure what they're called either. Here are some I got from coins in an older collection.
    20210323_203823.jpg 20210323_203830.jpg
     
  10. Roerbakmix

    Roerbakmix Well-Known Member

    These cardboard holders would be relatively easy to make by yourself. I've bought quite a number of coins from this seller, and the dimensions of the holders differ each time. Without knowing how they're made, I would suggest to use two sheets of acid-free cardboard. Use a perforator to create the circles, and use some special archiving glue to stick the holed and non-holed sheets together.
     
  11. The Trachy Enjoyer

    The Trachy Enjoyer Well-Known Member

    Not mine, sorry! I wish it was
     
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  12. AnYangMan

    AnYangMan Well-Known Member

    In Dutch we call these ‘muntleggers’ or ‘muntkartons’ . They are a very old method of storing coins that was especially popular at the end of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th; for the Dutch National Collection (KPK) they were introduced in 1895 and continue to be used until this day I believe. Other large Dutch collections from that same period used them as well. I have never seen any from collections outside of the Netherlands and surrounding countries so I think they are wholly a continental European phenomenon, but I am interesting if someone can disprove that! They were chosen by these institutional collections because it made for easy storage in square drawers, all the while being able to include information on the base of the ‘muntlegger’. A handful of 19th century originals from my collection deaccessioned from an academic Dutch collection:

    0aee9600-97da-4abe-93cd-be03758e9fe5.jpg

    That being said, I echo what @Roerbakmix posted; these seem to be handmade and relatively recent. I don’t think a company has manufactured them, as even those from the Academic collections tend to vary quite a bit in size, material and thickness. We know that in the 19th century they were produced and handmade by the assistants at the National Collection and various other instances purchased these from them. Whether a manufacturer picked up the design later I couldn’t tell you. The collection this coin (and those with comparable holders) is from, was formed relatively recent and these muntleggers appear to be his making.
     
  13. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & avid numismatist Moderator

    I’ve seen them- once in a blue moon- but have no idea where one gets them.

    I thought they’d be a fun thing to use like a business card, if one were a coin dealer. You could put a cheap but fun World coin or a US Wheat cent or Buffalo nickel in there- something like that- and orient it like a business card.

    In other words, have the Mylar coin window on the left, where a logo would normally go, an then one’s business card or promotional text on the right, printed on a sticker you could attach to the holders. People would be more likely to keep your business card if it contained an inexpensive but interesting coin, right?
     
  14. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & avid numismatist Moderator

    Come to think of it, if memory serves, I believe I received this coin from Germania Inferior Numismatics (Netherlands) in a holder like that.

    PS- maybe try “muntkarton” as a keyword? I just did a quick search and did get a hit from Amazon.nl, but they were the usual square 2x2 format and not 2x3 or whatever that rectangular format is. Still, @AnYangMan’s clues might get you closer.
     
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