Weird 1936 buffalo nickel error or pmd?

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Write2bfree, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. Write2bfree

    Write2bfree Active Member

    Hi all,

    Found this nickel and it looks like something hit it from the reverse side really hard. Is this pmd or an error?

    Note: the center of the nickel seems perfectly fine.Thank you.

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  3. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Your Nickel is so old that it could be anything.. could be both
    It's well circulated so it could be either a hit (PMD) or a small Lamination Error.
    Not really that weird :meh:
     
    Pickin and Grinin likes this.
  4. Write2bfree

    Write2bfree Active Member

    But wouldn't a pmd type of hit leave an impact marking? Also just curious, if it was a legitimate error, would it still be lamination not a "strike thru"?

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  5. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Like I stated.. It's so old that it is hard to say exactly what it could be.
     
  6. MontCollector

    MontCollector Well-Known Member

    Looks like mostly PMD to me...had a long hard life.

    The hole in the hip on reverse I have seen a lot, not sure what causes it, but seems pretty common on well worn Buffs.

    Your red arrows, the left one is pointing to more PMD...but the right one is not PMD or an error....Hmm how do i put this...The buffalo on reverse is a bull and is engraved anatomically correct.

    Hope that helps you out a little.

    Here is the reverse of a 1927 Buff I have with same "hit" on hip. 1927PREV_opt.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2017
  7. Rick Stachowski

    Rick Stachowski Well-Known Member

    Like Paddy said, very worn coin . Study this reverse ( 1930 ) and you will know then .
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  8. Write2bfree

    Write2bfree Active Member

    Thank you for your comments. Now I want to know how you all can explain the pictures below of the same buffalo nickel (I thought I test the people on their credibility of their knowledge):

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  9. Write2bfree

    Write2bfree Active Member

    The buffalo nickel I assume can't be Pmd for the most part. There is ABSOLUTELY no counterfeiting or intentional warping of the nickel which was observed under (up to 400x) microscope. I want to know is how this might have been done. Thank you.

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  10. Write2bfree

    Write2bfree Active Member

    Bump

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  11. Stoneman2

    Stoneman2 New Member

    This is a big reason I become disenchanted with this forum. There are regulars here that give the best answer they can with the information and illustrations they are given. They profit not one bit from what they freely give. If an answer seems not to fit your question , give thanks , then ask again.
    No one appreciates being tested
     
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  12. Write2bfree

    Write2bfree Active Member

    I never said that they were wrong. All I did was further the discussion by asking another question. I think in any hobby, I think if you are the ones who are commenting and providing answers, then to become even more accurate, shouldn't one be challenged from time to time? I have no doubt in the responses I receive from every but I do have to make sure I don't use a valuable coin at a store that could potentially be a new discovery that could have been shared with everyone due to the fact that an expert made one slight mistake from an observation they think could not possibly exist.

    Also, the old ways of observing coins has changed and i feel like the way of collecting coins from what I've studied and gained experience through this forum had me realize that the veterans are very experience but I was curious as to what extent so that other hobbyist as well as I could know to what level of credibility they have when talking about coins in general. Just because someone has been in the hobby for 20 years does not make them an appraiser like how a PA is still not a Doctor at the end of the day.

    I do not mean to insult anyone but rather challenge their knowledge on this nickel. We all know it's been worn down but what I want to know is what do you think could have made this nickel like this?

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  13. Stoneman2

    Stoneman2 New Member

    It's not a bad thing to challenge others. I have a issue with how Dr. Wiles interprets what is a 1911-d rpm-003 1c verses rpm-006. I sent him a link to photos that to my best ability I tried to illustrate the issues I have seen.
    My concern with your post is that you obviously have the ability to illuminate a coin you wish to photograph to illustrate what you wish to be seen. If your desire was to show the curved nature of the coin then it could have been done. This omission is like a quiz on tomorrows chapter where you can get close to the correct answer ,which was given, but lacking the details of information yet to be presented.
     
  14. Stoneman2

    Stoneman2 New Member

    So that this isn't just about me fussing please look at the last photo you posted. This pic showed clearly that whatever happened to your coin happened outside of the striking chamber.
    If you look at the third surface of your coin ( the edge ) you will see that it is not 90degrees from the flat surface the coin rests on. This angle could not happen during the strike as the edge is formed by the third die ( the collar ) . How the coin was curved is anyone's guess , and that is all it would be.
     
  15. Paddy54

    Paddy54 Variety Collector

    What you have here is a very worn-out Buffalo nickel that someone was going to make into a button or button like device on a jacket,purse,or another clothing item.
    The nickel was made concave by a ball like punch to give it a convex look.
    For the most part many date less buffalo's have been used to decorate clothing or crafts. In this case they used a dated one. No error, no variety , no value other than a nickel that's been damaged .
     
  16. SchwaVB57

    SchwaVB57 Well-Known Member

    It might be a few bucks to a collector of odd coins and medals.
     
  17. Mindy Beatty

    Mindy Beatty New Member

    I have one like this too. There seems to be two different metals on mine.
     
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