TRIVIA - Dollars, etc.

Discussion in 'Clinker - In Memoriam' started by Clinker, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. Clinker

    Clinker Coin Collector

    Around 1518, a huge silver strike was made in Bavaria at Joachimstal (Joachims Dale) (pronounced Daler). A large silver coin was struck bearing an effigy of Saint Joachim on the obverse. In "high" German areas the new coins were referred to as thalers and people in "low" German areas called them dalers.

    English speaking visitors took some back to their countries and referred to them as dollars. Spanish coins of the period carried the Pillars of Hercules (the two giant rocks flanking the Strait of Gilbralter) on their reverse and were known as pieces of eight, Spanish milled dollars, and pillar dollars. With the large silver yields in New Spain, all over Central and South America mints sprang up to strike millions upon millions of these "hard dollars" (8 reales) (Pesos Duro).

    As history has proved out, these large dollar coins became the choice medium of exchange in China, Hong Kong, Tibet, Africa and most of the world. (China minted taels, yuans and dollars for trade throughout the orient).

    In 1780 Austria struck the Maria Theresa Thaler (Levant dollar) to compete in world trade. The coin has been restruck almost every year since by various mints throughout the world all bearing the 1780 date in uncirculated and proof.

    Great Britain and Australia struck their own trade coinage versions of the dollar, which includes the Hong Kong Dollar.

    Canada adopted the dollar as their monetary unit. Some micro and island nations mint coin and paper money dahlers, talas and dalas.

    Here's some photos:

    www.worldcoingallery.com/countries/coin.php?image=nmc2/73-ab85&desc=Baden%20km85%201/6%20Thaler%20(1856)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:1733_Spanish_Dollar.jpg

    www.worldcoingallery.com/countries/coin.php?image=nmc2/42-318&desc=Chinese%20Empire/Republic%20y318%201%20Dollar%20(1912)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Search?search=Maria+Theresa+Thaler&fulltext=Search

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Tradedollar.jpg

    www.worldcoingallery.com/countries/coin.php?image=img12/76-T5&desc=Great%20Britain%20kmT5%201%20Dollar%20(1895-1935)%20Trade%20Dollar

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Hk_money_coins.jpg

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:WesternSamoaP26-5Tala-%281985%29_f.jpg

    Clinker
     
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  3. Treashunt

    Treashunt The Other Frank

    Wow, thanks for the info, and the education.
    Frank
     
  4. acanthite

    acanthite ALIIS DIVES

    Thanks, Clinker, its interesting to see how those monetary systems ultimately mesh. By the way, I could (and do) spend hours in worldcoingallery.com!
     
  5. Clinker

    Clinker Coin Collector

    Treashunt:

    When anyone makes a comment or adds something relevant to my trivia items, it makes my day.

    Clinker
     
  6. Drusus

    Drusus Pecunia non olet

    very nice...Bookmarked this page for later :)
     
  7. Clinker

    Clinker Coin Collector

    To Drusus

    Thank you Drusus for reading this trivia article.

    Clinker
     
  8. Mikjo0

    Mikjo0 Numismatist

    Hey Clinker,
    Have you noticed the drastic increase in your readership over the last couple of weeks?
    It reminds me of one of those new TV shows that start out slow and then pick up steam until they're Seinfeld!
    You get more hits in 2 hours than some of my posts get in a week.
    So from now on,I'm going to start them like this:
    TRIVIA:found an old ancient piece-O-junk today by Mikjo0...:smile
     
  9. Clinker

    Clinker Coin Collector

    acanthite

    I probably learned about the website from you or someoneelse here.

    Clinker
     
  10. Clinker

    Clinker Coin Collector

    To Mikjo0

    Hmm.. Vewy Interesting!

    Clinker
     
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