TPGs & Unconventional Coins

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by JeffC, Jan 15, 2021.

  1. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    With not much places to go to on a Friday night, I resort to surfing the net to see what coins I'd like to buy. But once more, I'm resigned to window shopping, since most - I mean ALL - the coins I really like are above my budget of 20-25 bucks.

    While perusing some interesting coins, a question came to me: When a TPG grades a coin with an unconventional surface, do they ignore the non-metallic part(s) of the surface? I mean, if a coin is made of metal plus something else, how do they regard that "something else?" How do the non-metallic elements of a coin come into play in the TPGs' assessment?

    Here are some examples of the coins I'm talking about. None of them are mine.

    Here's Palau's annual "OUNCE OF LUCK" coin. Do the TPGs ignore the condition of the real 4-leaf clover?
    TPG-A.jpg

    And here's Fiji's Seashell coin. Surely, the UCAM or DCAM designation does not apply to the faux shell side. Is that side ignored?
    TPG-B.jpg

    This next example is my favorite series. It's POWER COIN's Great Micro Mosaic Passions series, which focuses on famous artworks. For this one, there are 7,000 micro tiles. Again, do the TPGs ignore the entire tiled side?
    TPG-C.jpg

    Next is Palau's Forbidden City $20 piece. Here, there's a stone in the center. Precious stones are graded differently. Again, would the MS70 grade exclude the grade of the stone?
    TPG-D.jpg

    Finally, from Palau's SACRED ART WINDOWS series, here's one featuring Notre Dame Cathedral (minted and issued before the fire). So here again, I assume the art glass in the center would not come into play in the TPGs' evaluation?
    TPG-E.jpg

    Just curious about the treatment of these coins with unconventional surfaces. And there are so many more. If you know, please share. If not, I hope you enjoyed the photos and have a great weekend!
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  3. thomas mozzillo

    thomas mozzillo Supporter! Supporter

    Very nice looking coins. Maybe @Insider could answer you.
     
  4. baseball21

    baseball21 Well-Known Member

    Same way as all other coins, everything is considered.
     
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  5. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    I sent NGC and PCGS this question. See what they say.
     
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  6. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    But how do they professionally evaluate gemstones, art glass, and clover horticulture? Just wondering.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
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  7. Insider

    Insider Talent on loan from...

    baseball21, posted: "Same way as all other coins, everything is considered."

    IMO, THIS is what should be done; however, from what I've seen, it is not. I'll be waiting forever to read a comment from NGC or PCGS - then, I'll write how I do it which is just one person's technique. ;)
     
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  8. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Nice looking coins you've got there Jeff!
     
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  9. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    Hahaha. None of them are mine. I can only wish.
     
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  10. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    The ones in the micro mosaic series go for thousands each. A bit above my $25 budget.
     
  11. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    Please tell me. In case NGC and PCGS don't reply.
     
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  12. Beardigger

    Beardigger Well-Known Member

    Not only do I collect Coins......art glass and gemstones are my other 2 collecting interests....so I know a little about evaluating each. Since they are all different in evaluation technique I would doubt that a TPG would grade anything other then the coin surface itself. With glass, it would be dependent on any chips or scratches, which should not be problematic in a coin like you show. with gemstones, grading is even more difficult then coins, and I would suspect that a TPG would not wade into that themselves.
     
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  13. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Just save your money. :)
     
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  14. baseball21

    baseball21 Well-Known Member

    This. They aren't going to say the gem clarity isn't enough to be a 70 etc. They actually don't even guarantee the gems or that the color wont fall off for things like that
     
  15. MIGuy

    MIGuy Supporter! Supporter

    IMG_3903.JPG IMG_3904.JPG IMG_3905.JPG Here's my unconventional coin - in a double wide PCGS slab - it's really thick - I love meteorites (and coins) so I've got both in this! Fun fact, you can't store this in a PCGS blue box - it's too thick.
     
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  16. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

  17. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    When you get the time, do you mind sending me some photos of your art glass?
     
  18. MIGuy

    MIGuy Supporter! Supporter

    Yep a tiny chip of the space rock.
     
  19. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    Wonder why they plated the silver with copper. I'm so used to seeing the reverse process.
     
  20. baseball21

    baseball21 Well-Known Member

    To make it look more like an impact zone
     
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  21. MIGuy

    MIGuy Supporter! Supporter

    Yes, it hit in the Moroccan desert, they were going for that look. The coin is about 3/4 of an inch thick with the indent from the meteor impact, which is why PCGS double slabs those.
     
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