Token, token who's got the token?

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by fretboard, May 20, 2019.

  1. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    Check this out! If you look at my token album I have one of these Erickson wooden leg tokens. Heyden was selling one on pebay and the sale just ended! I don't know if I can show you the link but I'll include a pic and item number. Really a nice token from the end of WWI. It just sold for $258 and change, damn!! That's a big money there!! Just out of curiosity, any of youse bid on it?

    223510982171

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/2235109821...IT&_trksid=p3984.m1436.l2649&autorefresh=true

    https://www.cointalk.com/media/early-1900s.11408/


    s-heyden.jpg s-sheyden.jpg
     
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  3. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    Neat pictorial of a bizarre subject. That does seem like a lot of money for a relatively modern token.
    Something to watch for.
    Thanks.
     
  4. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    Yeah, I used to have two of these tokens but I sold one. It's amazing how many followers the seller has. Plus he's selling someone's collection off so he has some very nice pieces listed! Too many followers equals too much money! $258.77 Ouch! :D
     
  5. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & odd Moderator

    I'm not surprised it went for strong money, considering the oddball subject matter. Very cool piece.
     
  6. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    I'm thinking if I was to sell mine, I'd be lucky to break $100. :D I won't part with mine for less than a hundred as it's one of my coolest. :smuggrin: When I was in the 6th grade I had a teacher with a wooden leg, that was in 1964. He was a war veteran, very nice and honorable teacher. If you've ever seen people go nuts, throw a wooden leg on ebay and you'll make a ton of money! :D Oh, strike that idea, pebay has changed alot, maybe not like than anymore, but that's how it used to be. ;)
     
  7. longnine009

    longnine009 Most Exalted Excellency

    It's a deviance world today. What better place to find it than EXO and errors. :)

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    Last edited: May 21, 2019
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  8. Mainebill

    Mainebill Wild Bill

    Cool thing. I’ve had some over the years I found in attics. Also early leg braces probably from polio i never knew there was any demand. I just sold them for what I could get
     
  9. harley bissell

    harley bissell Well-Known Member

    The majority of his auctions start at 99 cents so I have implicit faith in his prices realized. Every token or encased that I have sold him have auctioned except one civil war era rubber token that he probably sold directly to an advanced collector like Bowers.
     
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  10. JeffC

    JeffC Active Member

    @fretboard - I've got a question on the reverse design of the token. I recognize all the "good luck" symbols (horseshoe, wishbone, four-leaf clover) but the one on the lower right. What is that?
     
  11. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    I'm thinking they're hieroglyphics. In the late 1930's and most likely before, there were Egyptian symbols being used as a way to cover all bases for good luck, is my guess. I'm sure there's more to it, than covering all bases. ;) Maybe more about it is in the church of good luck link! :D

    http://www.churchofgoodluck.com/Tokens_and_Coins.html
     
  12. willieboyd2

    willieboyd2 First Class Poster

    The "Dont Worry Club" emblem on the token reverse was a generic design.

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    Kline Clothing of Los Angeles Dont Worry Club Good Luck Coin
    Brass, 32 mm, 9.62 gm

    There are probably hundreds of different advertising tokens with that reverse.

    On the "Kline" token the horseshoe, four-leaf clover, and hieroglyphs are upside-down.

    :)
     
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  13. JeffC

    JeffC Active Member

    Oh, heiroglyphics does make sense. Thanks.
     
  14. harley bissell

    harley bissell Well-Known Member

    Lower left may be hieroglyphs - I couldn't say with certainty. Lower right is definitely a wish bone. They are commonly shown on encased cents.
     
  15. JeffC

    JeffC Active Member

    I was wondering why you mentioned the Wishbone, then I noticed I can't tell my right from my left!!! Lol.
     
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  16. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

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