State/Confederate Currency

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by Kentucky, Sep 18, 2021.

  1. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    My brother-in-law in Florida was telling me that he had a lot of Civil War Currency. He sent me this picture of the stack:
    [​IMG]
    The bills are not in particularly good shape and are either Bank of the Empire State:
    [​IMG]
    Macon Savings Bank:
    [​IMG]
    Or Georgia Savings Bank:
    [​IMG]
    Do these have any value? Is there any particular thing to look for? I am totally lost with this stuff. For someone in FL, you could probably go look.
     
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  3. Bradley Trotter

    Bradley Trotter Supporter! Supporter

    Interesting. Might I suggest that your brother-in-law procure some large-sized acetate currency sleeves? I'd hate to see any further damage done to these historic notes through careless handling or the elements, for that matter.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2021
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  4. JeffC

    JeffC Second star to the right, straight on til morning!

    Looks like the notes were signed by hand. Amazing.
     
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  5. MSL

    MSL Active Member

    Nice Georgia obsolete notes. I would tell you to look in Haxby's reference but the Georgia Savings Bank and Macon Savings Bank notes are not listed there.

    I am not very knowledgeable about Georgia obsolete notes - however I think
    (1) they all do have some value - but none will make you rich or even finance a trip to Georgia.
    (2) the $20 Bank of the Empire state is not uncommon but has a cool picture of Henry Clay - "the great compromiser" at bottom right. In AU it might fetch $100 or more - in your note's condition it would likely net only a very small fraction of that. If you have the $100 from the same issue though you have a much more valuable note.
    (3) The Georgia Savings Bank note is also common - or at least I've seen it before a few times - it's worth maybe something more than its face value. If you had one in better shape you might get more, but probably less than $100 even if uncirculated.
    (4) I haven't seen the Macon Savings bank note - I believe it's a very common obsolete and not a modern replica.
    These notes are great for history - but not for making your fortune - there are many more notes than collectors of them - still they do not appear to be worthless copies.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2021
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  6. MSL

    MSL Active Member

    Absolutely - the only thing that guaranteed any value was the reputation of the bank that issued them so the President of the Bank and/or the cashier signed them personally indicating he was putting his (very rarely her - but sometimes) name behind their value.
     
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  7. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & Eccentric Moderator

    I'd send ya some if you want, @Kentucky. I've got a fair-sized stack of currency sleeves, and I don't do paper money.
     
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  8. masterswimmer

    masterswimmer Well-Known Member

    Bet you have heavy, saggy pockets on payday ;)
     
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  9. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & Eccentric Moderator

    I hardly ever handle cash at all anymore. Direct deposit. Debit card. 21st century, baby! :woot:
     
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  10. love old coins

    love old coins Well-Known Member

    Ask @Collecting Nut...that's who I turn to for anything related to CSA notes.
     
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  11. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Hand signing of notes was the normal. Next time I post a CSA Note check out that thread. You’ll be surprised.
     
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  12. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    @Kentucky All the notes I see are known as Obsolete Bank Notes. Not to be confused with CSA Notes. CSA Notes have Confederate States of America on them. As you noted they are note in the best of shape. They all have value and depending on what you have and the condition of the bill, well, that’s what determines their value.

    I’m sorry I missed this thread when you posted. I collect CSA Notes but not the obsolete bank notes so I have no idea of value. I have a few but I prefer the CSA Notes and their history. You’ll need to do some research on what you have.
     
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  13. Searcher64

    Searcher64 Member

    Some of the CSA notes were printed on stone plates near the end, because of the lack of metal to make the plates.
     
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  14. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    Thanks, all. My BIL (brother-in-law) was wondering if they really were currency or were promissory notes and I don't know the difference.
     
  15. SteveInTampa

    SteveInTampa Always Learning

    Stone plates ?
    Please tell us how you discovered this. I have never heard this before.
     
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  16. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    News to me as well.
     
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  17. Hommer

    Hommer Curator of Semi Precious Coinage

  18. lettow

    lettow Senior Member

    Lithography uses metal plates or stone plates.
     
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  19. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    I was wondering if that was what he meant.
     
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