Smooshed 1982 penny, small or large?

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by BlondeWhit, May 16, 2019.

  1. BlondeWhit

    BlondeWhit New Member

    I guess the title kinda gave it all away. This date has been sort of smudged or whatever you want to call it and I just cant tell if its a small or large date. Can anyone help?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. FoundinTN

    FoundinTN Noob Supporter

  4. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & odd Moderator

    Smooshed.

    LOL. Should be an accepted numismatic term. :)
     
    KEK52 and DEA like this.
  5. paddyman98

    paddyman98 No Common Cents! Supporter

    Niether large or small..
    It is Medium Date :wacky:
     
    Mernskeeter and coin roll like this.
  6. Wanderingbark116

    Wanderingbark116 Active Member

    Presmooshing, large date!
     
  7. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    E-Large-gated cent.


    spinning the word elongated ... yeah .. a stretch .. get it, a stretch !! lol
     
  8. ken454

    ken454 Well-Known Member

    doesn't really matter, the coin is trashed, spend it...
     
  9. Spark1951

    Spark1951 Accomplishment, not activity

    Damaged large date spender...Spark
     
  10. KEK52

    KEK52 New Member

    What do you call what’s going on with that number, if it isn’t smooshed. I have seen it a bunch of times: it is like it should have been doubled, but the final strike to make the indentation wasn’t there. Looks like balloon lettering.
    Where/why do you call it damaged?
     
  11. ken454

    ken454 Well-Known Member

    because thats what it is...
     
  12. KEK52

    KEK52 New Member

    And the answer to the lettering question is...?
    Just trying to learn here, that’s all.
     
  13. KEK52

    KEK52 New Member

    So what you are saying is that all of the stuff that is going on w/this coin is post-production damage, correct?
    That’s all I wanted to know.
    Thank you
     
  14. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    Absolutely. The minting process will not produce a coin with that type of digit. If you have enough resolution, you can see the scratches that were left when something hit the numbers in the date giving it the smooshed appearance
     
  15. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

  16. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    If you take more than a cursory glance at the date, and really take a look at it, such as:
    upload_2019-5-24_22-3-29.png
    you can see abrasion marks really clearly on the top left of the 8 (and middle and lower), and on the lower middle of the 2.

    Of course, over time with general circulation those abrasion marks will be smoothed.

    This could have happened once or twice, or more times. All there's also many hits on the rim, and all around the coin. this pressure will take something and smoosh it down, and since it's metal it "expands" because of this. It's like pressing down on cookie dough.
     
  17. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    @KEK52
    remember, with damage it is quite unlimited. Very *unlimited* as coins can get stuck in machines, on the ground, purses .. and coins can be used for tools (screwdrivers, etc) PLUS just them banging against each other.

    But the minting process is fairly repetitive and consistent. So when true errors occur one can usually identify exactly where in the minting process it occurred.
     
    lordmarcovan likes this.
  18. Spark1951

    Spark1951 Accomplishment, not activity

    @KEK52 ...Clawcoins answered before I could, but yes, abrasion is the word I would use too.

    Similar to the circular scoring produced by rolling machines, this type of abrasion effect caught the 2 more heavily than the 8, the 9 was missed but sports a flattened tail and the 1 has a contact mark in the center. All are considered post-mint damage (PMD).

    Even normal circulation wear could technically be labeled "damage", but I tend to reserve the usage to gouges, holes, pitting, scrapes, environmental discoloration and...abrasion...Spark
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page