Show your Double Headed Notes!

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by hotwheelsearl, Oct 13, 2018.

  1. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Cheap B-Tard

    A seemingly fairly rare motif is that of notes with heads on BOTH sides. The "head" side is almost always the obverse, with the reverse being reserved for other, non-portrait artwork.

    This thread is for basically, notes that seem like either side could be the "obverse" side, since both sides have similar portrait heads.

    First example is the Australian 100 dollar.

    The only way I can tell that the Lady side is the obverse is that the signatures are on that side. The Gentleman side could easily be the obverse too.
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  3. Legoman1

    Legoman1 Active Member

    I have a Russian hundred rubles from 1910 with two faces- Catherine the great, and possibly Apollo? I wasn't able to find my original note- I hid it in a drawer, so I found this Internet image just to show an example. Other than that, I have no additional notes with two people/heads.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. paddyman98

    paddyman98 No Common Cents! Supporter

    Or... You can Google it ;)
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  5. Dave L

    Dave L Junior Member

    Brazil has some past issues that were pretty different in that respect.

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  6. chrisild

    chrisild Coin Collector Supporter

    All current notes issued by the Bank of England feature two (or rather 2+) portraits. ;) One is always Queen Elizabeth, on the other side you have ...

    £5: Winston Churchill
    £10 Jane Austen
    £20: Adam Smith (future polymer note: William "JMW" Turner)
    £50: Matthew Boulton and James Watt

    Christian
     
    George McClellan likes this.
  7. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Cheap B-Tard

    Here's a 1916 Austria-Hungary 1 Krone/Korona.

    Since Austria-Hungary was composed of Austria and Hungary, the notes of the kingdom had both German and Hungarian text.

    This one has not two, but three heads.
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