Photographing PL Coins

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by NPCoin, Sep 16, 2020.

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Which photo do you prefer?

  1. #1 - near direct lighting from 11 o'clock, camera at 6"

    3 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. #2 - near diffused lighting at 10 o'clock with far direct lighting at 1 o'clock, camera at 10"

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. #3 - near direct subdued lighting from above, camera at 10"

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. NPCoin

    NPCoin Resident Imbecile

    I have a 2018-D Kennedy half I'm putting into my binder. The reverse has nice proof-like fields (though the obverse misses the mark). I took three different photos for my database. None of them do the coin justice, but I'm just curious which one of the three others prefer (and I know that it's hard when you've never seen the coin "in hand").

    Right now, my camera setup is set for circulated coins. And, I will be taking better photos of the coin in the future. Any suggestions on lighting positions that may be best for a PL coin? I am sure that my normal setup for deep-mirrored proofs won't do the coin justice either, and I usually do not have the opportunity to photograph non-cameo proof (or proof-like) coins. It's been so long since the last one that I completely forgot how I set it up.


    2018D-Kennedy_Half-REV-PL-1.jpg 2018D-Kennedy_Half-REV-PL-2.jpg 2018D-Kennedy_Half-REV-PL-3.jpg
     
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  3. goossen

    goossen Senior Member

    The first one is the best IMO
     
    Malleus Maleficarum likes this.
  4. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Numismatic jack of all trades & specialist in none Moderator

    #1 seems OK.

    #2 I do not like at all.

    #3 isn't terrible, but seems rather shadowy.
     
  5. expat

    expat Remember you are unique, just like everyone else

  6. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    #1 is the best of the three but there is too much light. The fields are blown.
     
  7. Razz

    Razz Critical Thinker

    None. 1 is oversaturated. 2 has a reflection and 3 is a bit dark. All three don't have very good focus. Use a tripod and 5 second timer when taking photos to get the best focus. Almost there! Keep experimenting
     
  8. Denis Richard

    Denis Richard Well-Known Member

    # 1 is the best of the three, though as you noted, I'm sure none do them justice.

    For these kinds of coins I often place a single light at 12 o clock, about a foot away from the coin, at about a 30 degree angle above the table top, and I use a piece of 12" x 12" white translucent Plexiglas, 1/8 " thick, placed between the coin and the light, at a 45 degree angle (with one edge of the plastic resting on the table top) to diffuse the light. You will need to play with the angle and position of the plex to give you the shadows you want.

    Coin set.jpg
    But that technique gives me images like this.

    Aug 17 2020-1.jpg
     
    RonSanderson, expat and lordmarcovan like this.
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