PCGS offering $50,000 reward...

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by bruthajoe, Feb 4, 2020.

  1. Nyatii

    Nyatii I like running w/scissors. Makes me feel dangerous

    Wonder if it is the source of the ore used and the minerals/impurities therein?
     
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  3. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    If it were impurities in the alloy, wouldn't you expect them to stretch out during rolling, so you'd see milk streaks rather than spots? Then again, I've assumed "copper spots" on gold are due to alloy non-uniformity, and they're round. Calling all metallurgists...
     
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  4. Nyatii

    Nyatii I like running w/scissors. Makes me feel dangerous

    I'm suggesting the impurities could be minerals indigenous to the area where the ore is mined and the minute amounts that are scattered through the alloy could oxidize. Such as lead which is found many times with silver and oxidizes white. These impurities wouldn't have to be a complete homogenous alloy with the silver.
     
  5. iPen

    iPen Well-Known Member

    Is the reward for preventing milk spots, removing milk spots, or both?

    Also, what if you patent it, market the product, and then let PCGS know of the solution - can you still claim the reward?
     
  6. GenX Enthusiast

    GenX Enthusiast Forensic grammatician

    If you figure it out and patent it, the reward money will be forgotten, dwarfed by the piles of cash that many treasuries will shell out to acquire the technology;)
     
  7. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

    :jawdrop: I hope you weren't to hard on the renegade>
     
  8. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

    Preventing I assume, since they believe it is happening during the planchette production or silver refining... PCGS " Our feeling is that it has something to do with the .999 silver composition, as the earlier pre-1965 90% silver coins seldom spot. However, it could also have something to do with the way the planchets are prepared or washed. "
     
  9. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

    That's a good point. You would think it's more when the planchetts are punched. Lubricant being infused into the surface under the high pressure and heat. But wouldn't they be able to figure that out quickly?
     
  10. HaleiwaHI

    HaleiwaHI Active Member

    I don't know how it is where you guys live, but here in the islands where there is high humidity, proper storage is critical to avoid clouding or milking
     
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  11. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

    I rinse in acetone and use 1x1 and 2x2 zip bags and then sort into larger zip bags. I have seen people go so far as vacuum sealing. I don't like flips, books or tubes and capsules are too expensive for common coins. I want to be as close to my coin as possible with the ability to conveniently remove them and this was my solution. There has been no storage method discovered that prevents the silver spots in question.
     

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  12. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

  13. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    This is an issue with Peace Dollars more than mosern NCLT silver.
     
  14. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    More on Peace dollars? I had to dig around a little to see that it's a known problem on some Peace dates. For ASEs, the clamor over it has been deafening.

    I'll admit that I might be falling victim to sampling bias. How would you go about determining where this shows up the most?
     
  15. baseball21

    baseball21 Well-Known Member

    Actual milk spots are far worse on modern NLCT than peace dollars.
     
  16. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

     
  17. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    Financially, yes. Collectors have always known about milk spotting on Peace dollars, and they are priced in.
    The amount of money spent on grade rarity ASEs baffles me - I don't see how a "coin" with nearly all of a multi-million mintage can be worth hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. The future will show their true value. See what collectors are offered for 70s a few years after issue. 2020s in MS70 slabs can be had for less than $40.
    These silver NCLTs are fun to collect, but they are not long term investments.
     
  18. baseball21

    baseball21 Well-Known Member

    Milk spots have nothing to do with how you wish market prices for things are.
     
  19. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

    Doesn't the market go by the population? There are only 130, 2016P ms70 ASE on pcgs. Mintage was over 37.7 million. Must have been a bad year for quality???
     
  20. baseball21

    baseball21 Well-Known Member

    Mintage is the most overrated thing in numismatics.
    The 2016 P mintage was a lot lower though.
     
  21. bruthajoe

    bruthajoe Recovering

    https://silvereagleguide.com/mintages/
    The 2016-dated coins were officially sold out on December 6, 2016 with total annual sales of 37,701,500 ounces, down by nearly 20% compared to the prior year???
     
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