Oldie....

Discussion in 'World Coins' started by panzerman, Oct 24, 2020.

  1. panzerman

    panzerman Well-Known Member

    Just picked this up from Leu Auction.

    EL Hemihekte (1/12 Stater) ND struck 550BC
    Kyzikos Mint
    Mysia/ Kyzikos (Greek City State in Asia Minor)
    2 known 01225q00.jpg
     
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  3. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector

    :wideyed: Forgive me if this is common knowledge as I know little of the coinage of the Greeks but this is electrum?
     
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  4. panzerman

    panzerman Well-Known Member

    Yes "EL" = electrum (natural deposits where found by rivers) Electrum was usually 50/50 gold/silver content.
    The first coinage originated in Asia Minor (Modern day Turkey)
    Lydians began striking EL coinage circa 670 BC. The electrum was found along river banks back then. Around same time/ Ionians began making coinage in Kyzikos/ Miletus/ Samos/ Phokia/ Lesbos.
    John
     
  5. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector

    Yes, I thought it was this region. I knew it was approx 50/50 but I am also curious if they were seperated from one another. I might have to go down a google wormhole.
     
  6. medoraman

    medoraman Supporter! Supporter

    ALL electrum coins were reconstructed from gold and silver. The very first coins in the world, at Lydia, were reconstructed even though electrum exists in nearby streams. It was determined by excavations of the Lydian mint that ancients could purify silver and gold to very high levels, so they knew what they were doing. I found it fascinating how the very first coins were "standardized" at a silver to gold relationship much lower in gold than what was found naturally. Even the first coiners in the world were stealing from the public! :)

    Edit, btw a terrific example. Well struck and a fresh die!
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
  7. Seattlite86

    Seattlite86 Outspoken Member

    Very cool!!! I understand that the earliest known coinage dates to about 600BC.
     
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  8. panzerman

    panzerman Well-Known Member

    Yes, actually the first known coinage came from Ionia/ Lydia circa 670BC
     
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