Not a favorite, but interesting coin...

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by marchal steel, Oct 30, 2020.

  1. marchal steel

    marchal steel Member

    I picked this up recently from a collector, came out of a box that he's held onto for several years. It's a coin with a head on each side; it looks to be the same head but reversed and indented, and offset. He's a pretty knowledgeable fellow and came to the conclusion that the poor fellow stamping the coin was probably drunked up at the time. 81B8BCE8-0422-492E-85FF-927562215D64.jpeg
    D75A0E74-305E-47E3-A1D2-40A6C4D6354F.jpeg
    I can't blame the guy for imbibing--- the conditions had to be miserable.
     
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  3. DarkRage666

    DarkRage666 Wannabe Supporter!

    I can't even see the pictures... they're so blurry
     
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  4. marchal steel

    marchal steel Member

    But I do like the coin, as it tells a tale...
     
  5. marchal steel

    marchal steel Member

    I know dark, and I apologize. I've been using an i-phone 7+ to take the photos, but I have some learning to do.
    Sorry about that...
     
  6. DarkRage666

    DarkRage666 Wannabe Supporter!

    I use an iPad air 2... much older than the iPhone 7... you may have to wait a few seconds before it focuses... pull the phone back wait for it to focus then slowly push your phone towards the coin... btw never use the zoom feature... it doesn't work very well
     
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  7. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

  8. Gavin Richardson

    Gavin Richardson Well-Known Member

    +VGO.DVCKS, John Conduitt and ominus1 like this.
  9. Victor_Clark

    Victor_Clark standing on the shoulders of giants Dealer

    it's a Gallienus brockage
     
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  10. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Well-Known Member

    Dark? How about not even close to being in focus. I can't even tell if it is a coin or a blob of chewed gum.
    I'm not trying to be rude, but hopefully you can give us better photos in the future.
    Welcome to CT.
     
  11. ancient coin hunter

    ancient coin hunter I dig ancient coins...

    My advice would be to take a step backward until you reach the point of focus. You are too close to the object.
     
  12. ominus1

    ominus1 Well-Known Member

    ..well now Vic..i thought that too on 1st inspection...but the 2nd photo shows the bust to be much lower than the 1st pic....would that still be a brockage?...
     
  13. ominus1

    ominus1 Well-Known Member

    ..some people are naturals...:smuggrin:
     
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  14. ominus1

    ominus1 Well-Known Member

    ..here's the Missoura method of taking pics...:D picture taking my way 003.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

  15. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    A brockage occurs when a coin sticks in the upper die and is used to strike the next coin. There is no reason to expect them to align perfectly. I have a page:
    http://www.forumancientcoins.com/dougsmith/brock.html
    Septimius Severus "Emesa" mint
    rg5200bb2072.jpg
     
  16. ominus1

    ominus1 Well-Known Member

  17. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

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  18. Gavin Richardson

    Gavin Richardson Well-Known Member

  19. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    Gavin's photo illustrates the fact that brockages almost always show the obverse twice, once incuse, until about 260 AD when reverse brockages become more common (like Gavin's Sol from the Constantinian period. This is probably due to a new technology with hinged dies that started about that time making it easier to do reverse brockages. Earlier, coins were more likely to be seen if they stuck to the lower die.
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. marchal steel

    marchal steel Member

    Well--- it is agreed that I'm not much of a photo dog. I did however read up a bit and took better pics which I'll attach.
    Everyone is right, I think you'll see the "GALL" in the coin before it runs out of metal; I'm not much into "errors", although I know they are very popular with others. I just get a kick out of seeing something like this, that it happened way back when.
    Doug Smit- thanks for explaining brockage so well...
    Gallenius 1.jpeg
    Gallenius 2.jpeg

    It really is interesting to see these kind of things. Thanks again, people...
     
  21. marchal steel

    marchal steel Member

    dougsmit- I like your pic of the hinged die. Prior to this did the fellows have big biceps and triceps?
     
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