Nickel Wrong Planchet

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Coinblaster, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. Coinblaster

    Coinblaster Active Member

    This nickel is 30 grams below normal weight any thoughts?? received_1805471246261092.jpeg received_266881654640398.jpeg
     
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  3. jensenbay

    jensenbay Well-Known Member

  4. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh Supporter

    A Nickel weighs 5 grams so it can’t be 30 grams light. The lower weight of this nickel is due to it being ground down. All damage, PMD.
     
    NOS likes this.
  5. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    DEFDAM - Definitely Damaged :yack:
     
  6. Coinblaster

    Coinblaster Active Member

    I afraid so it does weigh 30 grams lighter
     
  7. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Please show it on a gram scale :facepalm:
     
    Danomite likes this.
  8. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh Supporter

    You must be missing the Decimal point. o_O
     
  9. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    If it actually pulls up on the scale with 25g of force, I think you need to skip CoinTalk and go directly to your local physicist.

    Did you find it lying on the ceiling above a CoinStar?
     
    hotwheelsearl likes this.
  10. Coinblaster

    Coinblaster Active Member

     
  11. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Well-Known Member

    Isaac Newton would like a word.
     
  12. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Well-Known Member

    That is 0.3 grams, which is 100 times less than 30 grams.
     
  13. Coinblaster

    Coinblaster Active Member

    That's how my scale works I'm just trying to shoe its way less
     
  14. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    No it isn't, you are reading it wrong. 5.89 - 5.59 = 0.30g

    Just realized, I have that exact same scale.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
    Danomite likes this.
  15. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh Supporter

    You need to calibrate your scale or get a new one. Nickels weigh 5 grams +\- .194 grams.
     
    -jeffB likes this.
  16. Coinblaster

    Coinblaster Active Member

    Not sure how to calibrate my scale I was just trying to show it weighed less then a regular nickel
     
    nuMRmatist likes this.
  17. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Well-Known Member

    Fair enough, it certainly does weigh less. However, someone taking a dremel with a grinder attachment can certainly remove that mass of metal easily.

    Here's an example of a nickel struck on a dime planchet.
    planchet.jpg
    As you can see, the nickel is simply not complete. Your example has full rims and full details all the way through. If a coin is struck on a smaller planchet it will, by definition, lose the details on the edges. Yours is a fully struck nickel with post mint damage.
     
  18. Coinblaster

    Coinblaster Active Member

    Ok thank you
     
    hotwheelsearl likes this.
  19. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    Most scales don't need that much calibration. You just have to recognize the decimal. 5.00 g is 5 g, not 500 g. If you want to check it, take 20-30 nickels and weigh each separately then average them and it should be very close to 5 (or 5.00).
     
  20. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Well-Known Member

    Hope that helps. The only possible options for a wrong planchet for a nickel are:

    1. Dime (as pictured above)
    2. Quarter:
    plahcnet2.jpg
    As you can see, since the nickel is smaller than a quarter, there is a considerable amount of "extra" material on the rims. The ocin is complete, but rather weakly struck on the edges and rims.

    Again, your coin has the same dimensions as a standard nickel. At this point, the only reason why a nickel would have less mass is
    1. thin, or split planchet
    2. metal grinded off

    Since the strike is strong on both sides, it's not an erroneously thin or split planchet.

    With process of elimination, we have ruled out:
    1. nickel struck on dime
    2. nickel struck on quarter
    3. thin planchet
    4. split planchet

    After all those options are exhausted, the only possible answer is Post Mint Damage, PMD.

    When searching for errors, use Occam's Razor - unless you have a very good reason, the simplest explanation is usually the correct one.

    In the world of error coins, the simplest explanation is always Post Mint Damage. Until you can absolutely rule PMD out, there is no use in attempting to ascribe a mint error to any coin.
     
  21. rascal

    rascal Well-Known Member

    Are you saying the coin in your photo is a nickel struck on a quarter ? If so how could that be possible since a quarter blank is way too large to fit in a nickel coining chamber. I know that quarters can be struck on nickel blanks but never heard of a nickel struck on a quarter.
     
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