New 2009 A Star series $100 Note w/ Error on back , Need help!

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by MikeHannon, Nov 15, 2013.

  1. MikeHannon

    MikeHannon New Member

    So I have a 100 dollar bill , the newly issued ones with an extra seal stamped on the wrong side, it is also a star series note. Where should I go to get this appraised in the Boston area? Thanks!
     
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  3. BigTee44

    BigTee44 Well-Known Member

    pictures! :)
     
    NOS likes this.
  4. funkee

    funkee Tender, Legal

    Appraisals are tough do to in person unless you hire a professional who does not have a conflict of interest that a dealer might. Generally appraisals are done for larger collections, because the cost of the appraisal may be worth more than a single note (or coin).

    You could certainly ask on this forum, but we need some photos to understand the nature of the error and the condition of the note.

    Still, a seal printed on the reverse of a star note could be rather rare and valuable - as long as it's not a bank stamp (or a where's george stamp) that you're referring to.
     
  5. MikeHannon

    MikeHannon New Member

    Okay so I posted a bit too quickly. One is a star note with no obvious defects, and the other is not a star note but with an error. cellphone 2381.jpg cellphone 2382.jpg
     
    Larry E, Timewarp, spirityoda and 4 others like this.
  6. Tyler

    Tyler Active Member

  7. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator--selling--make an offer I can't refuse

    Looks like it bled through, since it's backward on the reverse.... Just a guess on my part.
     
  8. funkee

    funkee Tender, Legal

    Very interesting. It could be a bleed through as silentnviolent mentioned, but it's far too crisp in my opinion. Bleed through tends to make a halo effect. Therefore, I'd suppose it is a partial offset error.

    It could also be faked. I think it's unlikely to be fake, barely a month after release.

    Nevertheless, I would send it in to PMG or PCGS to be authenticated and graded. This will help your resale value dramatically. Most buyers will be cautious about these errors, because they can be faked with a printer.

    You would need to be a member of ANA member for PMG or the PCGS Collectors Club to submit. There's an annual fee, so if you think you'll only grade this note... it might be worth asking a dealer to submit it for you.
     
    spirityoda likes this.
  9. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator--selling--make an offer I can't refuse

  10. spirityoda

    spirityoda Coin Junky Supporter

    very cool note. get it graded for sure.
     
  11. BigTee44

    BigTee44 Well-Known Member

    Ink transfer?
     
  12. MikeHannon

    MikeHannon New Member

    Just to give you guys a bit more info.. When I received the bill from a big name bank in Brookline I was skeptical about the bill so I asked the gentleman behind the counter to make sure it was real. If you notice , it hasn't bled through, its a completely different stamp on the back , the original is E5 and on the back it reads E2. Its a very crisp stamp on the back so I don't believe it rubbed off or bled through. I'm below an amatuer when it comes to collecting but ever since I found a 1944 Mercury Dime I've kept my eyes open. I live in Boston and wanted to know if anyone here on this forum would have any suggestions of good ,respectable places to show this bill to. Thanks guys , finding this bill has been a lot of fun!
     
  13. Dave M

    Dave M Francophiliac

    It is an interesting error, and I certainly hope its real!

    Just to clarify a couple things, I think the note you're talking about is not a star note, assuming it's the one on the left in the image. Also the print on the back is E5, it's just reversed, so it looks like an E2.

    Get it in a holder asap, and get it graded...
     
  14. bonniview

    bonniview Active Member

    Try http://www.denlys.com they might be able to help you. Their local to you and well respected in the currency market. I don't know if he has a store in town or everything he buys/sells is just online. At least they can give you advice but they would need to see the note.
     
  15. MikeHannon

    MikeHannon New Member





    The one on the left is the error, the one on the right is just a star note
     
  16. Numbers

    Numbers Senior Member

    Offsets are always reversed. An offset occurs when the press misfeeds and tries to print without any paper present, so that the ink intended for one note instead ends up on the backing behind the sheet. The next sheet then comes along and picks up that ink on its wrong side, in reverse.

    There are other types of errors that can produce correctly-oriented extra images, but those aren't offsets (and generally they're much rarer than offsets).

    Also, "bleed-through" basically doesn't happen; the printing ink is too thick. Even a note with a massive ink smear, with far too much ink on the note, won't show any significant bleed-through to the other side. Anything that looks like ink bleeding through the paper is probably an offset (or if it's small and spotty, then ink that transferred from one freshly printed sheet to another when the sheets were stacked before the ink was fully dry).
     
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  17. MikeHannon

    MikeHannon New Member

    Hey guys, if any more of you are interested in either of the bills please just send me a message with your contact information and I'll respond as soon as possible. Thanks, Michael
     
  18. CamaroDMD

    CamaroDMD Supporter! Supporter

    Is it possible that the sheet of notes was placed on top of another sheet when the ink was still wet and the seal and the E5 transferred to the back of this note?
     
  19. Texas John

    Texas John Collector of oddments

    It's an offset error. The previous sheet was torn or folded as it went through the printing of the black seal and district numbers, and the ink was deposited on the opposite surface, to be printed in reverse on the sheet that followed.

    The interesting part is that it suggests the FRN seal and district numbers were printed separately from the serial numbers.
     
  20. Numbers

    Numbers Senior Member

    Right. The green Treasury seal is also printed separately from the serial numbers--so the overprint has three individual components, two of which are green. When an error affects the overprint, it can affect either the entire overprint, or only some components of it.
     
    NOS likes this.
  21. Thomas Moses

    Thomas Moses New Member

    Well i have one also but it didnt go through but you can see the doubleing on the print
     
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