Mystery Penny (fake?)

Discussion in 'World Coins' started by BronzeAge, Apr 17, 2021.

  1. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    I've tried Wikipedia's entries for Canada, Ireland, UK, New Zealand and Australia, but couldn't find this coin. It's a bit bigger than the Canadian coin of the same year, but it has a slightly different color (alloy) and has the same QEII bust and words or abbreviations.

    The metal cage and chains on the reverse should be blatant. Maybe it's a former slave colony like Jamaica?
     

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  3. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

    I can't see the date clearly . What is it ?
     
  4. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    1977
     
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  5. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

  6. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    Here is the Canadian 1969 penny on the left, and the mystery 1977 on the right (after being cleaned up).
     

    Attached Files:

  7. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

    Follow my link . Worth 22 cents
     
  8. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

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  9. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    NO!
     
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  10. Muzyck

    Muzyck I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a biscuit today.

    You want to avoid ever doing that again. Cleaning a coin like that destroys any potential value.
     
  11. offa the saxon

    offa the saxon Well-Known Member

    It’s a portcullis as found on castles etc. Nothing to do with slavery.
     
  12. coloradobryan

    coloradobryan Well-Known Member

    It still circulates in the UK and is worth 1p.
     
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  13. furryfrog02

    furryfrog02 Well-Known Member

    Not worth more than face. You can still get these in circulation in the UK.
     
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  14. offa the saxon

    offa the saxon Well-Known Member

    I an understand the confusion over this coin from the OP, some unscrupulous shysters on eBay try to claim it as extremely rare and list it for hundreds of pounds.
     
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  15. John Johnson

    John Johnson Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure why you can't find it. It's from Great Brittain. Google 1977 New Penny and you will get plenty of results.
     
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  16. manny9655

    manny9655 Well-Known Member

    Britain never has put their country name on their coins or their postage stamps. That's the dead giveaway. You may see an abbreviation like "BR" or "BRIT" or "BRITT" or the word "BRITTANIA", but if you see the reigning monarch and no other country indication, it's from the UK. The abbreviations "D G REG F D" on the obverse stand for "Dei Gratia Regina Fidei Defensor", which translates to "Queen by the grace of God, defender of the faith". I saw many of these when I was in England in 1973. And as was posted earlier, DON'T clean them. Maybe a dip in pure acetone (NOT nail polish remover, but PURE acetone) but that's it.
     
  17. John Johnson

    John Johnson Well-Known Member

    Rats. Can't edit now, but that typo in Britain is really bugging me.
     
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  18. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    Thanks for the info. That was my second guess right after I hit send.
     
  19. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    Thanks for the info. I like how some coins have room for some of the words, and some coins just abbreviate them. I guess they need tiny sculpturs to make the letters smaller.
     
  20. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    Sorry. But I'm predicting it'll be a dark brown oxide again in a few years. Currently, though, I'm making a rainbow of alloys. I need all the Canadian bronze and brass pennies (4% tin, 3% tin, etc).
     
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  21. BronzeAge

    BronzeAge Member

    Easy mistake. Start typing Brit and the spell checker recommends Brittany. And I think I've seen the double T elsewhere, like on old maps and in history books.

    Honestly, I don't think there are any T's in the word "Britain" or "Brittany". Have you heard them say it? They use a glottal stop, like when Americans say got.
     
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