MERRY PI DAY!!!!!

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by TypeCoin971793, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Today, March 14, is Pi Day because 3.14 is the first 3 digits of everyone’s favorite universal constant: π! In celebration of Archimedes’ world-changing discovery and calculation, post your coins of Syracuse and/or your most circular Greek coins!

    I have no coins of Syracuse, and this is probably my most circular Greek:

    BF192990-4D5C-4874-9D8F-ED4DFFE7D20C.jpeg 8AEC452A-23CD-44F7-BB14-CE2D5BD98624.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019
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  3. zumbly

    zumbly Ha'ina 'ia mai ana ka puana Supporter

    Happy Pi Day!

    Here's one from Syracuse from Archimedes' time.

    Syracuse - Hieron II AE27 Horseman ex Meisner 3042.jpg
    SICILY, Syracuse. Hieron II
    AE27. 15.45g, 27mm. SICILY, Syracuse, circa 240-215 BC. CNS 193; HGC 2, 1547 (S); SNG Cop 843. O: Laureate head of Hieron II left. R: Horseman riding right, holding couched spear in right arm; N below, [IEΡΩNOΣ] in exergue.
     
  4. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    My only coin of Syracuse:

    Philistis.jpg
    Philistis, wife of Hieron II.
    Greek AR 5 litrae.
    Syracuse 270-230 BCE, 4.46 gm, 18.1 mm.
    Obv: Diademed and veiled head, l., palm branch behind.
    Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΑΣ ΦΙΛΙΣΤΙΔΟΣ, Nike driving biga to left, E in l. field.
    Refs: SNG ANS 893; SNG III (Lockett) 1017; Forrer 196.
     
    Andres2, Jay GT4, Ryro and 8 others like this.
  5. LA_Geezer

    LA_Geezer Well-Known Member

    Pi are not square, Pi are round.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Dug13

    Dug13 Member

    Merry PI day!. 19247FBC-DAEB-406E-8066-9D8FD0318BDF.png
     
  7. ancient coin hunter

    ancient coin hunter Redditor Lucis Aeternae

    Happy Pi Day everyone.
     
    TypeCoin971793 likes this.
  8. randygeki

    randygeki Coin Collector

  9. juris klavins

    juris klavins Well-Known Member

  10. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    Always curious if he learned it from the Egyptians...

    upload_2019-3-14_16-0-51.png
    SICILY Syracuse Hieron II 274-216 BC Æ26 15.9g hd Hieron II L - ΙΕΡΟΝΩΣ Horseman galloping r holding spear HGC 2 1547 CNS II 193


    upload_2019-3-14_16-4-59.jpeg
    Egypt SCARAB Middle Kingdom 2065-1650 BCEScarabaeus Sphinx
     
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  11. rg3

    rg3 Well-Known Member

    I did not realize pi factorial was so popular! Just kidding. :) You also could say happy 4 times (1/2)! squared - day, if you have the Gamma function at your disposal. Ok, enough of these antics. Here is my only Archimedes era issue from Syracuse:

    Jc6Q4xnXZ8PytQ235gAdck3BR9prgK (1).jpg
     
  12. Ryro

    Ryro Change your thoughts. Change the world. Supporter

    Sorry. The switch from Android to iPhone has been awful and I cannot find my combined images. BTW, which is the obverse?
    EAE5A7FC-8D43-4BDB-A0DF-66052054D279.jpeg F15A4ADA-F703-4A2E-AB01-3AA00D68CF6E.jpeg
     
  13. Ocatarinetabellatchitchix

    Ocatarinetabellatchitchix Well-Known Member

    Happy pi day from a french speaking guy........

    CE4CB73F-F5D8-4C74-9E19-CF3EFCCF7BAD.jpeg
     
  14. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    The chariot is the obverse.

    This AE25 coin of Messana under the Mamartines (220-200 BC has a pi denomination mark abbreviating 'pentonkion' in the left reverse field.
    g20565bb3248.jpg
     
  15. Ken Dorney

    Ken Dorney Yea, I'm Cool That Way...

    I feel like I have to be the 'bummer in the room'. It's pretty dumb. Really. And its just not relavent. In the news there was a gal who calculated it to 31.4 trillion digits. Honestly, that has no meaning or bearing to humanity. If one thinks about it, well...
     
    7Calbrey likes this.
  16. There’s a lot of dumb things in this world. Doesn’t make them any less fun. :)
     
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  17. Ken Dorney

    Ken Dorney Yea, I'm Cool That Way...

    Fun is where you find it!
     
    TypeCoin971793 likes this.
  18. 7Calbrey

    7Calbrey Well-Known Member

    O.K. Out of fun, I'll start asking myself who is the scientist or Mathematician that discovered the constant relation between the diameter and the circumference of any circle. Greek..
     
  19. Andres2

    Andres2 Well-Known Member

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