Featured Lucilla Venus standing types

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Roman Collector, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    The coins of Lucilla have two varieties of obverse inscriptions:

    1) Coins emphasizing that she is the daughter of Marcus Aurelius: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F (and variations)

    2) Coins bearing her name only: LVCILLA AVGVSTA.

    The reverse types of her coins are rather pedestrian -- coins @dougsmit would describe as "such-and-such standing -- and typically feature goddesses and personifications of feminine virtues, such as Concordia, Diana, Hilaritas, Juno, Salus, Venus, etc. Often, these reverse types are struck in all metals, and the same design may appear on aurei, denarii, sestertii and middle bronzes.

    Mattingly and other scholars believe coins with the longer inscription describing the empress as daughter of Marcus were issued earlier (AD 164-166) than those reading LVCILLA AVGVSTA (AD 166-169). In most instances, a reverse type is associated with a single type of obverse inscription. However, a few reverse types that appear with the longer, earlier obverse inscription were reused later with the shorter obverse inscription. One of these was the reverse type reading VENVS and depicting the goddess standing, holding an apple and scepter. Here are some examples from my collection:

    Longer, earlier obverse inscription:

    Lucilla VENVS denarius long obv inscription.jpg
    Lucilla, AD 164-169.
    Roman AR denarius, 3.42 g, 18.2 mm, 6 h.
    Rome, AD 164-166.
    Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
    Rev: VENVS, Venus, draped, standing left, holding apple in extended right hand and vertical scepter in left hand.
    Refs: RIC 784; BMCRE4 322-24; Cohen 70; RCV 5491; MIR 16; CRE 261; ERIC II 35.

    Lucilla VENVS Sestertius.jpg
    Lucilla, AD 164-169.
    Roman orichalcum sestertius, 21.52 g, 28.8 mm, 10 h.
    Rome, AD 164-166.
    Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
    Rev: VENVS S C, Venus, draped, standing left, holding apple in extended right hand and vertical scepter in left hand.
    Refs: RIC 1763; BMCRE4 1167; Cohen 72; RCV 5506; MIR 16; ERIC II 67.

    The shorter, later obverse inscription:

    Lucilla VENVS denarius short obv inscription.jpg
    Lucilla, AD 164-169.
    Roman AR denarius, 3.00 g, 18.25 mm, 6h.
    Rome, AD 166-169.
    Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
    Rev: VENVS, Venus, draped, standing left, holding apple in extended right hand and vertical scepter in left hand.
    Refs: RIC 785; BMCRE4 *, p. 432; Cohen 71; RCV --;CRE 262; ERIC II 22.

    This coin also comes in a variant with a different hairstyle, as shown on this example sold by Numismatik Naumann in 2013:

    1649879.jpg

    Coins of this reverse type with the later obverse inscription are much scarcer than those with the earlier inscription. The British museum has no examples in the denarius or sestertius denomination and only seven denarii have come up for auction in five years, according to acsearchinfo.

    Post your Lucillas, comments, or anything you feel is relevant.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
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  3. Justin Lee

    Justin Lee I learn by doing

    Very nice coins, RC, and thank you for the info on the obverse legend timeline! I've always been a fan of Lucilla's coins... She is usually depicted in a very elegant and regal, yet slightly sad way. I don't have any Venus reverses, so here is my only one, a Juno type As with later obverse legend type.

    CollageMaker_20180828_210653802.jpg
     
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  4. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Lovely middle bronze!
     
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  5. Bojan

    Bojan Well-Known Member

    How they know this is apple and not globe? Why apple and not some other fruit or diferent object?
     
  6. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    @Bojan : Because of the role apples play in the mythological story of the judgement of Paris.
     
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  7. Michael Stolt

    Michael Stolt Well-Known Member

    Some lovely Lucilla's there :) I have a thing for this imperial lady, so even though I collects Roman Republicans exclusively I do have this one as well :)

    Lucilla. Augusta, AD 164-182. Æ Sestertius (29mm, 20.04 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, circa AD 161-162.

    Obverse: Draped bust right.

    Reverse: Venus standing left, holding apple and scepter.

    References: RIC III 1763 (Aurelius); MIR 18, 16-6/2a; Banti 39.

    Provenance: CNG e-Auction 422 (13 June 2018), lot 542.



    [​IMG]
     
  8. Valentinian

    Valentinian Supporter! Supporter

    LucillaCONCORDIA.jpg
    Lucilla, struck 164-169 or possibly much later (183?) according to BMC.
    RIC 759. BMC 333-335. Sear II 5480.
     
  9. Mat

    Mat Ancient Coincoholic

  10. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    I regret that I do not have a Lucilla / Venus. Yours is great @Roman Collector !

    Here is a Lucilla that I can chip in...

    RI Lucilla AR denarius Juno seated  flower child in swaddling clothes Seaby 36.JPG
    RI Lucilla AR denarius Juno seated flower child in swaddling clothes Seaby 36
     
  11. Ryro

    Ryro Another victory like that will destroy us! Supporter

    WoWiE! Some real show stoppers right there RC! Hubba hubba to that last one. If Lucilla was as promiscuous as they say (though they say the same about the rest of them). She was a looker:kiss:
    Fun thread btw. Here's mine:
    CollageMaker Plus_201846145443524.png
    Lucilla
    Marcus Aurelius (161-180
    AD) for Lucilla. AR Denarius
    Rome.
    Obv. LVCILLA AVGVSTA,
    Draped bust right.
    Rev. VENVS, Venus
    standing left, holding apple
    and sceptre.
    RIC III 785.
     
  12. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    I think that has the LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F inscription.
     
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  13. Ryro

    Ryro Another victory like that will destroy us! Supporter

    I was counting letters on it when you said that. Not sure where I got the attributing. Noted and appreciated.
     
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  14. Numisnewbiest

    Numisnewbiest Well-Known Member

    I don't have the Venus reverse, but here is my Lucilla with the Pietas reverse. On a sidenote, she was the daughter of Marcus Aurelius, not Antoninus Pius.

    4MkZoQT9gF6fw24XJR7r5qQdKY3seH - Copy.jpg
     
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  15. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    D'oh! Corrected that.
     
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