Legit question: Is it possible to "dip" PVC off of a slabbed coin still in the slab?

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by C-B-D, Apr 19, 2019.

  1. C-B-D

    C-B-D U.S. Type Coins or death!

    Seriously. If you buy a Peace Dollar or something in an old rattler holder, but you can see green PVC on it, can the slab be submersed or a syringe be used to apply acetone to the coin while leaving it in the slab? Seems like we could save some coins in old holders that way, if it were possible. Also, I wonder if it would leave a film in the inside of the holder? @GDJMSP , @BadThad , @mikenoodle ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
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  3. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    If those slabs are made of acrylic (which appears to be the case), absolutely no way. The slab will craze, fog, and dissolve away long before the PVC goes anywhere.

    If you're interested in saving the coin, crack it out. If you're interested in saving the holder, don't worry about the PVC. If you're interested in saving the coin in its current holder -- which, of course, you are -- I'm afraid there's not much you can do.
     
  4. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

  5. stldanceartist

    stldanceartist Minister of Silly Walks Supporter

    I second (well, third now) what @-jeffB says - acetone will demolish that slab (including the label, hologram, etc) and turn your PVC problem into a melted plastic slurry problem.
     
  6. C-B-D

    C-B-D U.S. Type Coins or death!

    How fast does that plastic begin to break down? Haven't tried this. Just 100% pure curiosity.
     
  7. -jeffB

    -jeffB Greshams LEO Supporter

    It will get hazy almost instantly on contact with acetone. Even contact with acetone vapor can do it.
     
    TypeCoin971793 and C-B-D like this.
  8. Evan8

    Evan8 A Little Off Center

    Yup agree. I use acetone almost daily when working on cars. It will eat plastic in no time. Ive splashed it on safety glasses before and you just toss them in the trash as they are instantly ruined.
     
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  9. TypeCoin971793

    TypeCoin971793 Just a random nobody...

    This is ABS, but it is still eye-opening

     
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  10. Victor

    Victor Coin Collector

    I've never heard this question before. And I have never thought about it.
    Interesting concept.
     
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  11. C-B-D

    C-B-D U.S. Type Coins or death!

    Does Xylene react the same to plastic?
     
  12. desertgem

    desertgem MODERATOR Senior Errer Collecktor Moderator

    Yes , except for PTFE plastic, one brand name is Teflon.
     
  13. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    And even if the acetone DIDN'T react with the slab, how would you get it and the PVC residue OUT of the slab?

    The acetone might eventually slowly evaporate out through the syringe hole, but since it would do so slowly it would leave all the PVC residue behind still inside the slab where it could continue to damage the coin.

    You might try doing two holes in the slab and do a pressurized flush of a gallon of two through the slab to make sure as much of the residue as possible got flushed out. And use a pressurized dry air flow for a week to evaporate all the acetone out.
     
  14. stldanceartist

    stldanceartist Minister of Silly Walks Supporter

    I kind of want to be on the lookout now for some cheap slabs and do a time lapse haha...
     
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  15. C-B-D

    C-B-D U.S. Type Coins or death!

    Roosevelts will do.
     
  16. TheFinn

    TheFinn Well-Known Member

    I be wish. But coins usually upgrade once it's removed.
     
  17. stldanceartist

    stldanceartist Minister of Silly Walks Supporter

    I’m thinking clad state quarters...
     
  18. C-B-D

    C-B-D U.S. Type Coins or death!

    In rattlers??
     
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