Juno has many guises--let's see your Juno coins!

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Roman Collector, Feb 25, 2017.

  1. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Juno, the sister and consort of Jupiter, is depicted on a large number of coins, especially as a motif on the reverses of Roman empresses.

    Mamaea IVNO AVGVSTAE denarius.JPG
    IVNO AVGVSTAE, "Juno of/for the empress"; Denarius of Julia Mamaea depicting the goddess seated, holding a flower and an infant. On this particular coin Juno is depicted with the attributes of Juno Lucina (see below), who was the protectress of women in childbirth. RIC 341

    The goddess is depicted seated or standing, typically holding a patera and a scepter, and frequently accompanied by her sacred bird, the peacock.

    Maesa Juno Denarius.jpg
    Juno standing left, holding a patera and scepter. Denarius of Julia Maesa. The reverse features a die-clash, resulting in a ghost-like, incuse reverse image of the obverse portrait. RIC 254.

    There has long been a connection of Juno to money. In 390 BC, a flock of geese kept in Juno’s sanctuary on Capitoline Hill saved Rome by warning of an impending invasion by the Gauls. The Roman General, Marcus Furius Camillus, built a temple on the hill in gratitude for the Goddess’ warning. Approximately one hundred years later, the first Roman mint was built adjacent to the temple and the coins, struck with the head of Juno Moneta on the face, were called moneta. She has since been considered the protector of money and guardian of finances. For this reason, the epithet Moneta given to Juno has long been considered to be derived from Latin monēre, meaning to remind, warn, or instruct, but many scholars believe it derives from the Greek word μονήρης , meaning alone, unique.

    Juno Moneta.jpg
    Modern issue depicting Juno Moneta. Isle of Man, 1 crown. (Coin photo from online; I do not own this coin).

    Juno played numerous roles in Greco-Roman mythology and she appears on coins with numerous titles:

    Regina (Queen of the gods),

    Salonina IVNO REGINA Antoninianus (s).jpg
    IVNO REGINA, the Queen of the gods. As wife of Jupiter, she was naturally seen as queen of the Roman pantheon. This Antoninianus of Salonina depicts Juno among the stars, holding a patera and a scepter, and accompanied by a peacock at her feet. RIC (sole reign) 92.

    Lucina (referring to her role as the presiding deity of childbirth, i.e. “bringing the child into the light”),

    Domna IVNONI LVCINAE Sestertius.jpg
    IVNONI LVCINAE, to Juno Lucina, the "bringer of light. This Sestertius of Julia Domna depicts Juno Lucina seated, holding a flower and a baby. RIC 857.

    Sospita (the savioress),

    Lucius Roscius Fabatus Juno Sospita Denarius.jpg
    Juno Sospita was also a protector of women in childbirth. She was worshipped at temple in Lanuvium. She is characterized by a goatskin coat and headdress. This Denarius of L. Roscius Fabatus depicts the goddess on the obverse and a female figure (pregnant?) feeding a snake. Snakes were associated with health in the Greco-Roman world and accompany such health-bestowing deities such as Aesculapius and Salus. Sear RCV 363 (Coin photo from online; I do not own this coin).

    Conservatrix (in her role as patron goddess and protector of Rome),

    Mamaea IVNO CONSERVATRIX Denarius.jpg
    IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Denarius of Julia Mamaea depicting the goddesss with her usual accoutrements, RIC 343.

    and Victrix (victorious one).

    Salonina IVNO VICTRIX Antoninianus.jpg
    IVNO VICTRIX, Antoninianus of Cornelia Salonina depicting Juno in a military helmet. RIC (joint reign) 31.

    Post your Junos!!
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017
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  3. Sallent

    Sallent Live long and prosper

    Did you say Juno?

    L Thorius Balbus.jpg
     
  4. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

    Hmm no coins with Juno for me yet, I guess. I could've swore I had one. Nice coins!
     
    gregarious and Roman Collector like this.
  5. Bing

    Bing Illegitimi non carborundum Supporter

    C RENIUS.jpg
    C RENIUS
    AR Denarius
    OBVERSE: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
    REVERSE: Juno Capriotina in biga of goats right, C RENI below goats, ROMA in ex
    Struck at Rome 138 BC
    3.6g, 16mm
    Cr231/1, Syd 432
    Cn Blasio C F.jpg
    CN. BLASIO C. F. ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS CORNELIA
    AR Denarius
    OBVERSE: Helmeted head of Scipio Africanus the Elder right., CN. BLASIO CN.F. before, palm behind
    REVERSE: Juno, Jupiter being crowned by Minerva; monogram in field, ROMA in ex
    Struck at Rome 112-111 BC
    3.8g, 18mm
    Crawford 296/1; Cornelia 19
    L. THORIUS BALBUS.jpg
    L. THORIUS BALBUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS THORIA
    AR Denarius
    OBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita wearing goat-skin headdress, acronym I. S. M. R. behind.
    REVERSE: Bull charging right, F. above, L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue
    Struck at Rome 105 BC
    3.92g, 19mm
    Cr 316/1, Sydenham 598, Thoria 1
    L. THORIUS BALBUS 2.jpg
    L. THORIUS BALBUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS THORIA
    AR Denarius
    OBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita wearing goat-skin headdress, acronym I. S. M. R. behind.
    REVERSE: Bull charging right, E above, L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue
    Struck at Rome 105 BC
    3.75g, 20mm
    Cr 316/1, Sydenham 598, Thoria 1
    L PROCILIUS.jpg
    L PROCILIUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS PROCILIA
    AR Denarius
    OBVERSE: Bust of Jupiter right, SC behind
    REVERSE: L PROCILI F, Juno Sospita advancing right with sheild, spear aloft and serpent before
    Struck at Rome 80 BC
    3.7g, 19mm
    Cr379/1, Syd 771, Procilia 1
    T Carisius.jpg
    T. CARISIUS ROMAN REPUBLIC
    AR Denarius
    OBVERSE: Head of Juno Moneta right, slight drapery
    REVERSE: Implements for coining money: anvil die with garlanded punch die above; tongs and hammer on either side; all within wreath
    Rome 46 BC
    19mm, 3.49 g
    Crawford 464/2; CRI 70; Sydenham 982a; Carisia 1a
     
  6. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Woah! That's a nice collection of Juno types on those Republican Denarii!
     
    Bing likes this.
  7. randygeki

    randygeki Coin Collector

    Very nice!
     
    Roman Collector likes this.
  8. Orfew

    Orfew Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus Supporter

    I love the portrait style of the Blasio
     
  9. stevex6

    stevex6 Random Mayhem

    The Canadian "Juno" Awards

    L Thorius a.jpg

    L Papius Celsus She Wolf & Eagle.jpg L Papi.jpg Crispina Dupondius.jpg Lucilla.jpg fabatus bx.jpg Volusian a.jpg Volusian b.jpg L Thorius d.jpg

    L Thorius c.jpg


    Roman Collector => sweet OP-examples

    ... thanks for the opportunity to unleash my Juno junk!!

    :rolleyes:
     
  10. zumbly

    zumbly Ha'ina 'ia mai ana ka puana Supporter

    One of my favorites from last year features the last appearance of Juno Sospita on a Roman coin. She rarely shows up on coins of the Empire. Lanuvium being Commodus's place of birth was the reason for this occasion.


    [​IMG]
    COMMODUS
    AR Denarius. 3.33g, 18mm. Rome mint, Autumn - Dec AD 177. RIC (Marcus Aurelius) 646; Cohen 270. O: L AVREL COMMODVS AVG GERM SARM, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. R: IVNONI SISPITAE TR P II IMP II COS P P, Juno Sospita, advancing right, brandishing javelin in right hand and holding shield in left; in front, snake.

    Another Juno I'm fond of :
    IMG_6158.JPG
    Yeah, not a coin, but apropos to a thread about the goddess of childbirth, pregnant women and family given the movie's themes :D.
     
  11. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    I consider my Domna Juno Regina a rarity because the reverse type is a lot like the common reverse for Manlia Scantilla and the urge to tool a Domna into a Scantilla was hard for many people to resist. Come to think of it, the face on this coin is a little more harsh than Domna might be. Hmmmmm.
    rl6260bb1923.jpg
     
    dlhill132, Alegandron, Ajax and 9 others like this.
  12. Pishpash

    Pishpash Supporter! Supporter

    I got this one
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Trebonianus Gallus
    Coin: Silver Antoninianus
    IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG - Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
    IVNO MARTIALIS - Juno seated left, holding corn ears and sceptre.
    Mint: Mediolanum (252-253 AD)
    Wt./Size/Axis: 4.58g / 22mm / -
    References:
    • RIC 69.
     
  13. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Martialis is an epithet of Juno that isn't common. I'm not aware of any coins other than this one of Trebonianus Gallus that portray her in this way. Thanks for posting!
     
  14. Pishpash

    Pishpash Supporter! Supporter

    Ooooh, I wasn't aware :)
     
  15. Pishpash

    Pishpash Supporter! Supporter

    16 examples on vcoins, happy bunny :D
     
    stevex6 and Roman Collector like this.
  16. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Yep, and all Trebonianus Gallus, too!
     
    Pishpash likes this.
  17. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    How about a hard-to-find Juno from the 2nd Punic War...

    Campania CAPUA AE Semuncia 216-211 Juno Xoana Hannibal capital Italia Obv-Rev.JPG
    Campania, Capua
    Æ Semuncia circa 216-211 BCE,
    Æ 18.4mm., 4.58g.
    Obv: Bust of Juno r., holding sceptre on shoulder.
    Rev: KAPV (in Oscan) Two xoana draped.
    Ref: SNG ANS 215. Historia Numorum Italy 495.
    Comment: Rare. Green patina. Obv. Slightly double struck
    Ex: From the E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection.

    Notes: When Hannibal occupied Capua during the Second Punic War, he worked with the local Aristocracy and promised to make Capua the capital of Italia, and would raze Rome, once he destroyed the Romans. However, history was different from his promises. After the Punic War, Rome confiscated and tried to destroy all Capuan coinage minted during this time. They wanted to destroy any memory of Hannibal, and to further punish Capua. Consequently, Hannibal occupied coinage from Capua seems difficult to find.

    Xoana definition: Wikipedia explains it well...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xoanon
     
  18. dlhill132

    dlhill132 Member

    Really nice coins everyone. No Juno's for me.

    Doug
     
  19. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Very interesting and historical coin!
     
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  20. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    Thank you. I have always enjoyed those niche and odd-but-interesting sidebars in history. Capua had been the chief city of Campania for many years prior to the influence of Rome. They defected from Rome in 216 BCE after the Battle of Cannae. I could imagine a dynamic and successful Leader approaching Capua, giving them renewed hope that they could now become the Capital City for Italia, after being overshadowed by Rome for so many years... It was not just fleeting moments during their lives, rather this situation lasted for many YEARS during Hannibals' campaign in Italia during the 2nd Punic War (roughly 216-211 BCE not under Rome's control.)
     
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