Jason’s Coin Contest Giveaway #2 **1,100 Post Coin Contest Giveway**

Discussion in 'Contests' started by Jason Hoffpauir, Nov 13, 2016.

  1. Jason Hoffpauir

    Jason Hoffpauir World Coin Collector

    Jason’s Coin Contest Giveaway #2

    (Contest#2 will end next Sunday, 20 November at 11:22 CST)



    As promised lets’ jump straight into Coin Contest Giveaway #2


    So, let’s begin. Please answer each question and submit your answers to me via PM. You are more than free to discuss the questions on the forum and it is recommended but remember; others might just copy the answer that YOU did all the work to answer. Depending on how many people participate will determine how much more of a chance you could WIN!!! The point of this coin giveaway contest is so that you can expand your numismatic minds and find out a little more about the glorious and beloved hobby we call Numismatics. All answers must be submitted in exactly 7 days from the exact time the contest begins. Example: If it starts 10:00 AM on a given Sunday then it will end at 10:00 AM on the next following Sunday. This is just an example. Some or all questions were used from the archives of Bowers & Merena Galleries, Wolfeboro, NH. Thank you.



    Jason’s Coin Giveaway Contest #2


    1. The Numismatist, the only regularly issued (monthly) American numismatic publication, is edited by Dr. Geo. F. Heath, of Monroe, Michigan, who in “real life” in the past decade has done the following:


    a. Published a series of reference books describing die varieties of silver quarters, half dollars, and dollars (known as the Type Table) and opened a penny arcade near Monroe, featuring devices ordered from the Mills Novelty Co., Chicago (receipts were checked for scarce dates, such as 1877 Indian cents).

    b. Served on the Assay Commission at the Philadelphia Mint, started the Chicago Numismatic Society (a short trip from Michigan), and became a partner in a rare coin business with the backing of H.O. Granberg.

    c. Has served as curator and appraiser for dealer and historian Lyman H. Low, has submitted sketches to the Treasury Department for a new silver dollar design, and has declined an offer to be president of the American Numismatic Society.

    d. Served as mayor of his town, has journeyed widely on trains and written travelogues accordingly, and has operated a printing press in his home.




    2. A romantic tale involving early Massachusetts silver coins was told by Nathaniel Hawthorne and others and has it that:


    a. Captured silver furnished by Blackbeard the pirate was used to make such coins.

    b. Hannah Hull, daughter of mint master John Hull, had has her dowry her weight in silver Pine Tree shillings dated 1652.

    c. Pine Tree shillings, if bent twice, were useful for warding off witches and evil spirits.

    d. Queen Anne of England visited Massachusetts in 1704 and was presented with a small cabinet containing specimens of past silver coinage.


    3. According to a popular legend, the Indian Head motif on the obverse of the 1859 cent, designed by James B. Longacre, is the visage of:


    a. The engraver’s young daughter, Sarah Longacre.

    b. Anna Willess Williams, a Philadelphia schoolteacher.

    c. Helen Collins of Philadelphia, who later became Mrs. Henry Chapman, Jr.

    d. Sacagawea, an Indian woman who provided assistance in the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition.




    4. Dr. William H. Sheldon, author of Early American Cents and, arguably, the best-known name in that branch of numismatics, did or is alleged to have done all but one of the following:


    a. Take photographs of hundreds of nearly-nude college students including Yalies.

    b. Swiped coins from the American Numismatic Society.

    c. Cleaned all of his coins with a mixture of salt and vinegar.

    d. Devised a grading scale for large cents based upon a market formula which worked for a short time (from about 1949 to 1953).




    5. In the 1930s-noted dealer B. Max Mehl used this coin as a focal point for a national advertising campaign. By means of notices in Sunday newspapers, radio programs, and brochures, as well has his Star Rare Coin Encyclopedia, Mehl made this the most famous of all American coin rarities. Today it is believed that just five were struck, of which four can be accounted for. Of these, one is in the Smithsonian Institution (gift of the Norweb family) and another is in the American Numismatic Association Museum (gift of Aubrey and Adeline Bebee). This rarity is the:


    a. 1804 silver dollar.

    b. 1894-S Barber dime.

    c. 1885 trade dollar.

    d. 1913 Liberty Head nickel.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2016
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  3. Treashunt

    Treashunt The Other Frank

  4. Jason Hoffpauir

    Jason Hoffpauir World Coin Collector

    Greetings one and All!!!


    ***I first and foremost want to apologize for being late in giving you the results of CC #2 and putting out the new questions. I do not make excuses; but I did not have Internet connection until about 1 hour ago. Thank you for your patience and I will do my best in making sure this does not happen again. ***



    We have successfully completed Coin Contest #2 and we have a WINNER!!!


    I would like to thank all that participated in Jason’s Coin Contest Giveaway #2.


    Jason’s Coin Contest Giveaway #1 – Coinlover7


    Congratulations to Mr. Coinlover7!!!!!



    Your prize is:




    2016 UNITED STATES

    MINT SILVER PROOF SET!!!!!!!


    20161030_144005.jpg





    Please PM your mailing address and I will send out your prizes as soon as possible.



    Now that Jason's Coin Contest #2 is over I will provide the answers to each question for all to see. Thank you for participating and hope to see you for Contest #3!!!!




    Jason’s Coin Giveaway Contest #2



    1. The Numismatist, the only regularly issued (monthly) American numismatic publication, is edited by Dr. Geo. F. Heath, of Monroe, Michigan, who in “real life” in the past decade has done the following:


    a. Published a series of reference books describing die varieties of silver quarters, half dollars, and dollars (known as the Type Table) and opened a penny arcade near Monroe, featuring devices ordered from the Mills Novelty Co., Chicago (receipts were checked for scarce dates, such as 1877 Indian cents).

    b. Served on the Assay Commission at the Philadelphia Mint, started the Chicago Numismatic Society (a short trip from Michigan), and became a partner in a rare coin business with the backing of H.O. Granberg.

    c. Has served as curator and appraiser for dealer and historian Lyman H. Low, has submitted sketches to the Treasury Department for a new silver dollar design, and has declined an offer to be president of the American Numismatic Society.

    d. Served as mayor of his town, has journeyed widely on trains and written travelogues accordingly, and has operated a printing press in his home.






    2. A romantic tale involving early Massachusetts silver coins was told by Nathaniel Hawthorne and others and has it that:


    a. Captured silver furnished by Blackbeard the pirate was used to make such coins.

    b. Hannah Hull, daughter of mint master John Hull, had has her dowry her weight in silver Pine Tree shillings dated 1652.

    c. Pine Tree shillings, if bent twice, were useful for warding off witches and evil spirits.

    d. Queen Anne of England visited Massachusetts in 1704 and was presented with a small cabinet containing specimens of past silver coinage.





    3. According to a popular legend, the Indian Head motif on the obverse of the 1859 cent, designed by James B. Longacre, is the visage of:


    a. The engraver’s young daughter, Sarah Longacre.

    b. Anna Willess Williams, a Philadelphia schoolteacher.

    c. Helen Collins of Philadelphia, who later became Mrs. Henry Chapman, Jr.

    d. Sacagawea, an Indian woman who provided assistance in the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition.





    4. Dr. William H. Sheldon, author of Early American Cents and, arguably, the best-known name in that branch of numismatics, did or is alleged to have done all but one of the following:


    a. Take photographs of hundreds of nearly-nude college students including Yalies.

    b. Swiped coins from the American Numismatic Society.

    c. Cleaned all of his coins with a mixture of salt and vinegar.

    d. Devised a grading scale for large cents based upon a market formula which worked for a short time (from about 1949 to 1953).






    5. In the 1930s-noted dealer B. Max Mehl used this coin as a focal point for a national advertising campaign. By means of notices in Sunday newspapers, radio programs, and brochures, as well has his Star Rare Coin Encyclopedia, Mehl made this the most famous of all American coin rarities. Today it is believed that just five were struck, of which four can be accounted for. Of these, one is in the Smithsonian Institution (gift of the Norweb family) and another is in the American Numismatic Association Museum (gift of Aubrey and Adeline Bebee). This rarity is the:


    a. 1804 silver dollar.

    b. 1894-S Barber dime.

    c. 1885 trade dollar.

    d. 1913 Liberty Head nickel.













     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016
  5. Coinlover67

    Coinlover67 Well-Known Member

    Thank you, it was a fun contest.

    Sent from my A463BG using Tapatalk
     
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