Got a New Pushed Out Coin Pendant?

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by fretboard, Sep 18, 2019.

?

Is this pendant gold plated, if not what is it?

  1. Yes, gold plated, maybe 10k!

    37.5%
  2. Yes, gold plated, maybe 14k!

    25.0%
  3. Gold wash, not real gold!

    25.0%
  4. It's solid 14k gold!

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Spray painted gold!

    12.5%
  1. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    I bought this the other day, has the Patd Nov 22, 1904 date on the reverse! Just another pushed out coin pendant. :cigar: What do you think, gold plated, the real deal or somewhere in between? No 'k' stamp on it at all! :D It's been a long time since I've done a poll, so I hope it works! ;) Anyone?

    pushedout a.jpg pushedout b.jpg pushedout c.jpg pushedout d.jpg pushedout e.jpg pushedout f.jpg pushedout g.jpg pushedout h.jpg pushedout i.jpg
     
    thomas mozzillo and longnine009 like this.
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  3. PlanoSteve

    PlanoSteve Well-Known Member

    It has 1904 date on reverse, but the coin is 1907? What was the source of this purchase?
     
  4. Hookman

    Hookman Well-Known Member

    jk on the spray paint, fret. It's most likely 10k plate or gold wash. Hard to tell by looking at a photo.
     
  5. Burton Strauss III

    Burton Strauss III Supporter! Supporter

  6. Burton Strauss III

    Burton Strauss III Supporter! Supporter

  7. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    It looks gold plated to me. We have a couple of experts on these but I don't see them here very often. @saltysam-1 Can't remember the other ones user name. He was really good with these.
     
  8. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    Bump! Please vote! :D
     
  9. john59

    john59 Active Member

    You got this one on Ebay for $189.00 it's a Barber dime. Cant see the sides to see if it was cast.
    Best case you got 3.3 grams of cast 14k gold or a gold plated Barber dime
     
  10. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    You're only partially right! :D I will reveal how it tested after 7 days from when I started the poll. I will tell you that I made a mistake on my poll but it worked out better than I thought, that's all I can say. :D
     
  11. john59

    john59 Active Member

    I can't wait
     
  12. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    Yes, some call them repousse, 3D, pushed out, popped out etc.! :D
     
  13. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    Ok, since nobody gives a shizzle, I will answer what I want to! :D I won't get into the price but it weighs 3.3 grams and as it turns out it's better than I thought at 16k gold, solid gold. Not a lot of money, but definitely a rare and desirable piece! :cigar: Someone took the time to sand and wax, I forget the correct terminology but my guess is this was casted years ago, maybe even overseas, who knows! :D
    IMG_1544.JPG
     
  14. john59

    john59 Active Member

    Ok you got a 3.3 grams charm not a coin for for $189.00
     
  15. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    My point is it's rare and you don't see real ones like this around much. It's a gold pendant, it's a gold pushed out coin looking pendant. :D Price is never an issue when I see something I like, fortunately I never spend more than a couple hundred.
     
  16. john59

    john59 Active Member

    It's not a real pop out coin you can get cast copys made not rare at all. Just go to Ebay and buy a pop out dime they sell for $20- $30 or less and have a mold made and make as many you want
     
  17. fretboard

    fretboard Defender of Old Coinage!

    I know about the cheaper ones and I own a couple of those as well, here's a couple of pics of my cheaper ones. :D If I wanted to make myself a solid gold one, I could have saved a lot of money but that's not what I do, I collect. In short, I think they're rare and if I'm wrong, please show me the link or the pic. Part of the reason I'm on here is to learn anyways. :D

    Nov 22_1904 Pat'd_a.JPG Nov 22_1904 Pat'd_b.JPG pusheda.jpg pushedb.jpg pushedc.jpg pushedd.jpg
     
    lordmarcovan likes this.
  18. john59

    john59 Active Member


    You answered your own question. You could have made the gold one yourself at any time. They are not rare because of that. It's a charm, it is not a coin. Here are a few pictures of some of the ones I own. I have been collecting them for years.


    s-l160kkk0 (19).jpg s-l1600 (07).jpg s-l1600 (lk11).jpg s-l555500 (2).jpg
     
    lordmarcovan likes this.
  19. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    I did not know that any of these were cast. I thought they were all made with a punch and die with a real coin as the host. Not sure there is a way to put a date on something like this. They are still being made today.
    I'm not ready to call it rare without an experts opinion. I'll try and tag a guy that can help.
     
    fretboard likes this.
  20. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    This was posted by @saltysam-1 in an older thread.
    There are only two patents issued for theses. One by George Keppler the other by William Malliet. The pop-ups which carry the most value have patent bars inside them. One patent was issued in 1903 the other in 1904. Most of the collector value lies in coins from this era. Only one person has ever wrote about them in book form, he is Robert J. Stump. He was the only person who tracked sales and attached their retail values. It is also the only known price book in existence that has merit. There are about 100 printed. I do have a copy, and Oded Paz distributed them until they are now all gone. I obtained mine prior to finding out Oded was involved in the market. There was a blog that discussed them and he and Robert Stump were the driving force. After Robert died in 2011, Oded acquired the last copies from his estate. The blog closed down with Roberts' passing. The Repousse market primarily was in Chicago with the key jeweler being Kalo Jewelry. These are the premium pieces most sought after. Many of the coins used were from the late 1800's through the early 1900's. Also look for that patent bar to assure authenticity.
     
    lordmarcovan likes this.
  21. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

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