Gold Coins Found from Massacred Legions

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Mat, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Mat

    Mat Ancient Coincoholic

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  3. Sallent

    Sallent Supporter! Supporter

  4. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    Thanks @Mat , I saw a news blurb last night, but this one is a little better showing the gold.

    Well, I have a Denarius with Gauis and Lucius, now I need to get the Aurei... Maybe I will have to swoop in before @panzerman ...

    upload_2016-7-6_14-41-25.png
    Roman Imperial
    Augustus
    AR Denarius 27BCE-14CE
    Lugdunum mint, before 4 BCE
    Gaius-Lucius
    Sear 1578
     
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  5. $ignofthedollar

    $ignofthedollar Active Member

    Great read! Thanks!!
     
  6. Cyrrhus

    Cyrrhus Well-Known Member

    So that is not so far from where I live I know it...hummm time for MD long weekend...
     
  7. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    I have never understood traditional dating of these (2 BC to 4 AD). We are to believe that the type was continued until Caius died in 4 AD while Lucius died in 2? Certainly there were a lot of them made for so short a period whether 4 or 6 years so finding a group buried in 9 AD makes sense but I missed the evidence linking these few coins to one specific historical battle as opposed to a cache buried sometimes before that event or by the victors years later. In any event it would be quite a find.
     
  8. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    I read about that recently. They (the mint), had supposedly stopped minting them in 4 CE when Gaius died. I was kinda surprised also, that they had not stopped minting them when Lucius died in 2CE. Perhaps, after 4 CE, when there were no more heirs, Livia had them stopped :), just so there was no confusion when she was pushing Tiberius to be heir... I just do not know.
     
  9. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    That makes sense. From a political sense, the type was to illustrate that the matter of succession was under control and there was no reason to bother folks with minor details. I'm sure relatively few people knew of Lucius' death. Promoting Tiberius would certainly be a reason and Livia would be most likely to be on top of the matter.
     
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  10. Mat

    Mat Ancient Coincoholic

    Nice coin, would still like one of the type in time.
     
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  11. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    Thank you very much.
     
  12. green18

    green18 Sweet on Commemorative Coins Supporter

    Interesting read Mat........:)
     
  13. randygeki

    randygeki Coin Collector

    Thats pretty neat. Thanks for posting it Mat
     
  14. David Atherton

    David Atherton Flavian Fanatic

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  15. green18

    green18 Sweet on Commemorative Coins Supporter

    Just finished reading up on the battle of the Teutoburg Forest.........you ancient guys inspire me to educate and re-educate myself in matters of history.
     
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  16. Sallent

    Sallent Supporter! Supporter

    It wasn't so much a battle as it was a massacre. The Romans, in single file formation with weapons soaked with rain and tucked away, and the complete element of surprise from the Germanic warriors, didn't stand a chance. I doubt most Romans even had a chance to strike a single blow against the enemy before they were overrun and hacked to pieces.
     
  17. ValiantKnight

    ValiantKnight MMDCCXLV A·V·C Supporter

    They recently covered Arminius, Verus, and the Battle of the Teutoberg Forest in Barbarians Rising. It was one of my favorite segments of the series.
     
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  18. Bart9349

    Bart9349 Junior Member

    Great article. Thank you.

    The article proves again the great (but frequently unappreciated) contributions numismatics have made in understanding history, especially ancient history.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2016
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