Fourree Domitian.

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by JayAg47, Mar 1, 2021.

  1. JayAg47

    JayAg47 Well-Known Member

    I've been wanting an example of a fourree/fourrée coin to add to my collection, and I got this one from my recent coin show visit for just 5 bucks.
    A fourree Domitian with Minerva reverse. What I like about this coin is the layer of silver foil peeling off making Domitian look like a zombie. Also, looks like someone made a test cut next to Domitian's neck to his right side.
    If you look at 10 o'clock position on the reverse you can see the foil coming off like a 'coin' chocolate foil! fourree.png
    And my real Domitian.
    domitian.jpg
    Post your fourrees!
     
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  3. Jay GT4

    Jay GT4 Well-Known Member

    Nice fouree and not as common for Domitian. For a brief second I thought about collecting fouree's. I have 3 but this one was my favorite. I say was because it was either lost or stolen at a coin show :(

    Fulvia.jpg

    Bust of Fulvia as Victory right

    Lion right between A and XL (year 40) LVGV in ex DVNI above

    Lugdunum, autumn 43 BC

    1.37g

    Sear 1518
    RSC 4

    Antony's name is not mentioned on the coin but the date-numeral A XL (year 40) refers to his age at the time of the issue. A similar type was struck the following year which includes Antony's name and titles and recods his age as 41.

    Silver Quinarius fouree 1.36gm
    ex CNG 9/98 #1358
     
  4. Ryro

    Ryro They call me the 13th Caesar Supporter

    Coingrats on the new fouree!
    My only coin in gold is a fouree:
    Screenshot_20201215-145458_PicCollage-removebg-preview.png
     
  5. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    That is an appropriate example of a fourree and worth $5. It hurts me to see people paying solid prices for these coins but you did well to represent the fact that they are part of the numismatic history we study.
    The three Flavians:
    Vespasian
    rb1320bb0318.jpg

    Titus
    rb1400b00314lg.JPG

    Domitian
    rb1570bb1997.jpg
     
  6. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    It's common for ancient fourrée forgeries to have the reverse of one ruler muled to the obverse of another. This fourrée of Orbiana, for example, is a mule between an obverse of Orbiana and a reverse of her mother-in-law:

    [​IMG]

    Genuine Orbiana:

    [​IMG]

    Genuine Julia Mamaea:

    [​IMG]

    This may represent merely the effect of only having certain dies on hand. Alternatively, it may have been deliberate on the part of the forgers because it allowed them to identify their handiwork and avoid taking it as the genuine article if encountered in circulation.
     
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