Found a 1942 D silver nickel. What's the value?

Discussion in 'What's it Worth' started by Idries Pappas, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. Idries Pappas

    Idries Pappas Collector of US Coinage and Stampage

    I found this 1942 D silver nickel a while ago in my pocket change and this was before I really knew anything about coins. But, even though I didn't know it was silver, I still kept it because it was minted during WWII and had a nice patina. I threw it in a box with alot of other worthless old coins I had untill I learned about silver nickels and that I had found one. So, I placed it in a plastic holder, which it has been stored in for about a year now, and I want to know if it is worth anything above melt value. Any ideas? IMG_20180612_153554.jpg IMG_20180612_153627.jpg
     
  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. l.cutler

    l.cutler Member

    Well, that one is not silver. Partway through the year the coinage was changed to the silver alloy. The silver ones can be identified by the mintmark, which is large and above the dome of Monticello instead of on the right side.
     
    NOS likes this.
  4. Idries Pappas

    Idries Pappas Collector of US Coinage and Stampage

    Yes, you are right. I did some more research and in reality, no 1942 silver nickels were minted at Denver at all. A friend told me it was silver and I didn't bother to do more research. Oh well... Still minted during WWII, so I guess it's not too bad of a find.
     
  5. Idries Pappas

    Idries Pappas Collector of US Coinage and Stampage

    I do have a real silver nickel from 1943, though. It is a 1943 S nickel. It does have a couple problems, though, it is slightly tarnished on the reverse from being in a cardboard holder and it has a small dent above the A in America. How much is it worth? CM180612-212203001.jpg CM180612-212223002.jpg CM180612-212408004.jpg
     
  6. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    The first one is worth s nickel and the silver one about a buck.
     
  7. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Less than 14 million 1942-D's minted. In good condition it's worth more than a nickel. That one has seen better days.
     
  8. Santinidollar

    Santinidollar Supporter! Supporter

    That dent is a shame.
     
  9. Idries Pappas

    Idries Pappas Collector of US Coinage and Stampage

    So the 1943 S silver nickel is only worth melt value?
     
  10. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Most of the war nickels are only worth melt value unless it is great condition.
    Or a rare variety/error.
     
  11. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    What Michael K said says it all.
     
  12. RickO

    RickO Active Member

    That '43 S is ruined numismatically by the dent and associated corrosion on the reverse...still worth melt though.
     
  13. Idries Pappas

    Idries Pappas Collector of US Coinage and Stampage

    According to PCGS price guide, the 1942 D is worth $2-$4 in it's grade. This is probably high, but it should still be worth more than a nickel, right?
     
  14. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    If silver it's worth at least melt value. If a lower MS grade, not worth the cost to have it graded but if a high MS grade, then it's worth the price to grade it. A normal '42-D is worth face unless in a very high grade. You can not go by any price guide to get a value as they are all over priced from reality.
     
  15. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    In that coins grade it might be worth .10 cents.
    But there's no market for ten cent nickels. A dealer isn't going to give you 8 cents
    and sell it for 10. If you hold on to it, it's still going to be worth 10 cents.
    That's why it's worth just spending it as a nickel, or, if you like the coin
    it doesn't cost anything (.05 cents) to save it.
     
  16. Cheech9712

    Cheech9712 Every thing is a guess

    Yes sir. I'll guess fiddy cent on a great day
     
  17. Spark1951

    Spark1951 Accomplishment, not activity

    NGC lists VF20 for $1.25...that's pretty close to this coins condition, still a nice find...Spark
     
  18. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    This coin is nowhere close to VF20. (1942-D)
    It is VG at best. Also appears cleaned and scratched.
     
  19. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Worn and scratched so I'm at G-4, 6 at best. It may be pre WWII so it's old, 76 years old to be exact, but it's well worn.
     
  20. Spark1951

    Spark1951 Accomplishment, not activity

    Took another look...I was fooled by the complete rims both sides, the fact the letters are not blending into the rims. I had initially thought it had less wear on the reverse, but sit corrected. You and Collecting Nut were right, much more wear than vf20...I just didn't look close enough on the first go around, and that's not right, not fair to the OP and misleading to forum members.

    I will endeavor to be more observant...Spark
     
    Collecting Nut likes this.
  21. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    I tend to under grade coins. Price guides are just that, a guide to its value in any given grade. The true value is based on numerous factors, including but not limited to: grade, condition, market value in a specific area, supply and demand.
    If I over grade and use price guides, which is something most people do, I'm going to be disappointed when the real grade and value are determined.
    By under grading I get excited when the real grade is given. I'd rather be excited and glad than hurt and disappointed.
    In any case, the OP's coin is as myself and others have stated, worn and circulated to a low grade from good to very good.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page