First Seleucid Tet!

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by acb12345, May 24, 2022.

  1. acb12345

    acb12345 Member

    Got my first Seleucid Tetradrachm of Philip I for 70 EUR. How did I do? Also, any assistance on attribution would be appreciated. I've gotten fairly competent at attributing Romans but this is my Greek coin.

    IMG_2580.jpg IMG_2579.jpg
     
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  3. Andres2

    Andres2 Well-Known Member

    Congrats , heres mine, paid 65 GBP

    P1190164 best.JPG
     
  4. David@PCC

    David@PCC allcoinage.com

    Your coin is a posthumous issue of Philip under Roman rule.
    Antioch mint. Posthumus issue, sturck circa 69-57 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Nikephoros seated left; monogram below throne; Φ to inner left; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2488.6 or 2488.7
     
  5. AussieCollector

    AussieCollector Moderator Moderator

    Congrats on your Tet :) Love these.

    To note, I'd classify it as less Seleuicid, and more Roman provincial, because it wasn't struck under Seleucid rule, despite the style.
     
    ominus1 likes this.
  6. ominus1

    ominus1 Supporter! Supporter

    ..kool coin with many facets on history welcome to the dark side :) IMG_1072.JPG
     
  7. Carl Wilmont

    Carl Wilmont Supporter! Supporter

    Congratulations on the tetradrachm - a fine denomination to add to your collection, @acb12345. As with the example below, quite a few characters were squeezed onto the reverse of your coin along with a figure "carrying victory" (Nikephoros). In this case, Athena rather than Zeus.


    upload_2022-5-24_18-7-29.png

    Seleucid Kingdom. Antioch mint. Antiochos IX Eusebes Philopator (Kyzikenos). 114-95 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28 mm, 16.46 g). Diademed head of Antiochos IX right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ, Athena Nikephoros standing left, holding Nike in her right hand and spear and shield with her left, to left, monogram above A on left, small monogram A on right, all within a laurel wreath border.

    @Andres2, the light gold toning on your coin is attractive.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2022
    Mammothtooth, Andres2, Bing and 2 others like this.
  8. Terence Cheesman

    Terence Cheesman Well-Known Member

    @acb12345 Your coin appears to be a Philip Philadelphus from the mint of Antioch SC 2463 (2)k I have one that is similar
    Philip Philadelphus Ar Tetradrachm Antioch 88/87-76/75 BC obv Head right diademed Rv Zeus Nikephoros seated left holding Nike in outstretched right hand. SC 2463(2) i 15.82 grms 26 mm Photo by W. Hansen SKphilipphil4.jpg
    Philip was involved in the insanely fratricidal civil war the plagued the Seleukid Kingdom more or less until the Romans came in and made the region into a province of their rapidly expanding empire. He minted coins in large numbers. So much so that when some years later in 57 BC the Roman governor Aulus Galbinus needing some coins to be struck simply copied the coins of Philip. This continued until the series was finally discontinued by Augustus.
     
  9. robinjojo

    robinjojo Supporter! Supporter

    That's a nice coin, particularly the reverse, which has a well-centered strike. For the price, at €70, it was a good purchase. There is some roughness due to burial in all likelihood.

    Do you plan to collect other Seleucid tetradrachms? Many of these Hellenistic coins are quite beautiful. Like other ancients coins that are appealing artistically, historically or due to their higher grade command higher prices, but if you shop around and become familiar with the kings and the coins issued in their names, picking out nice examples, especially for the more common kings, you should be able to acquire some nice coins, such as this tetradrachm of Antiochus VII Sidetes, Tyre, 130-129 BC, which costed $235 (with sales tax) back in 2021.

    D-Camera Antiochus VII Sidetes tetradrachm Tyre 130–129 BC year 183 3-30-21.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2022
  10. acb12345

    acb12345 Member

    I am planning on picking for of them up. I absolutely love the portrait style of the Seleucid Kings and I really like that their are no legends on the obverse,
     
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  11. acb12345

    acb12345 Member

    Thank you everybody for the info! Super helpful!
     
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  12. Mammothtooth

    Mammothtooth Stand up Philosopher, Vodka Taster

    If you send it to me I will send an autograph back
     
  13. David@PCC

    David@PCC allcoinage.com

    I forgot to mention the OP has the controversy surrounding it as possibly belonging to Philip II Barypous. Aptly named thick footed as well as having some other medical issues that bear some resemblance to the OP portrait. An interesting post by @Pavlos that brought up this issue.
     
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