Finally Found a 1939 Henning Nickel

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by JCro57, Apr 12, 2019.

  1. JCro57

    JCro57 Making Errors Great Again

    I have four 1944 "No P" Henning Nickels, but I finally got one with one of the other dates after a couple years of searching. It is a pretty decent 1939, and it even has the "Looped R." Weighs 5.3 grams.

    Screenshot_2019-04-12-08-39-04~3.png Screenshot_2019-04-12-08-39-00~3.png

    People just don't want to let these other dates go, and they are seldom up for sale. I am very lucky I found it.

    In a few days it will be off to ICG for slabbing as they slab counterfeits. (I use them as educational pieces at shows.) Here are 2 of the 4 1944s I already had slabbed.

    VG-G are probably the best (and only) grades I have ever seen for Hennings as he reportedly used worn coins to make his dies, and I have never seen 1 step on Monticello, let alone Full Steps.

    Enjoy!

    Screenshot_2018-12-01-06-02-58~2.png
    Screenshot_2018-12-01-06-02-54~2.png
     
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  3. Dougmeister

    Dougmeister The Coin Scavenger © ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Which years have the looped "R"? I can never remember...
     
  4. LakeEffect

    LakeEffect Average Circulated

    What's your technique if you don't mind me asking? Visit dealers and search their junk boxes for Jeffersons? Or something else? Sounds like a fun treasure hunt.
     
  5. JCro57

    JCro57 Making Errors Great Again

    In the Buffalo area all the coin dealers know me and know that I deal in with very specific famous counterfeit pieces and error coins.

    I also just go on several dealers websites all across the country, some of whom I've also established good relationships with, or sometimes I just scan all the major auction sites
     
    LakeEffect likes this.
  6. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Got this photo from another site, the dot marker is interesting.
    20151121_1944-p_henning_opt.jpg
     
  7. Hookman

    Hookman Well-Known Member

    So what does ICG charge to slab one of these? I might get mine done.
     
  8. Hookman

    Hookman Well-Known Member

    I've also read there are dots in certain places on the legs of the letter M.

    I've also heard there is a 6th date that he copied but no one is sure which date it is,
     
    Kasia likes this.
  9. kSigSteve

    kSigSteve Active Member

    So you were the high bidder on the 1939. I had it on my watch list but the price hammered for higher than my max. Congrats on a rare off date Henning though. They very seldom come around.

    For those unaware it went for $347.
     
    Stevearino and JCro57 like this.
  10. Kevin Mader

    Kevin Mader Member

    Thanks for the tidbit of information. I found a 1939 Henning with the 'dot' marker in circulation. I was wondering what it might be worth. So Henning ended up using at least 2 reverse dies to make that vintage of nickel. That's interesting to know.
     
  11. JCro57

    JCro57 Making Errors Great Again

    I'm going to say with complete certainty you did not find a 1939 Henning nickel in circulation
     
    HaleiwaHI likes this.
  12. kSigSteve

    kSigSteve Active Member

    Pictures or it didn’t happen. :cigar:
     
    HaleiwaHI likes this.
  13. JCro57

    JCro57 Making Errors Great Again

    It didn't happen even if he shows them
     
  14. Hookman

    Hookman Well-Known Member

    There were/are no 1939 Henning nickels ??
     
  15. kSigSteve

    kSigSteve Active Member

    Is this a question or a statement?

    There are absolutely documented 1939 Henning counterfeit nickels.

    There is actually a photo of one on the first post of this thread. Did you look at it?
     
    JCro57 likes this.
  16. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    I don't understand. Why would it not be possible?
     
    LA_Geezer and Hookman like this.
  17. Hookman

    Hookman Well-Known Member

    Look at JCro's post just before mine. He makes a definitive statement that it just can't be.
    Then look at my post. It ends with double question marks. That is a doubly doubting question.
    In other words, It just can't be because Why? They just don't exist? Yet, we all know they do.
    So JCro, why are you saying what you're saying?

    Of course I read the thread. The ENTIRE thread.
    Didn't you ? The entire thread?
    If you had, you would have known that I commented twice earlier.

    Look at the post after yours. That is what my doubly doubting question is saying/asking.

    1 question mark makes a question.
    2 question marks mean " Do you know what you're saying? What do you mean? "
     
    kSigSteve and markr like this.
  18. KevinM

    KevinM Active Member

    Never heard or knew now I know.Thks ;) Kevin
     
  19. HaleiwaHI

    HaleiwaHI Active Member

    Since I'm not a Jefferson nickel collector, I knew nothing of the Henning nickel so I just had to look it up. People can learn a whole lot of what they didn't know before on this site. Here's part of what I found - http://www.error-ref.com/henning-counterfeit-nickel/ and then with a little research I questioned -
    Re: Is Francis LeRoy Henning Still Alive?
    i dont know if he is still alive, but thought this interesting, had never heard this b4

    Another 200,000 are thought to have been dumped in the Schuylkill River.

    An unofficial variety of the wartime coin dated 1944 was made in 1954 when counterfeit nickels were produced by Francis LeRoy Henning of Erial, New Jersey. He had previously been arrested for counterfeiting $5 bills. The 1944 nickels were quickly spotted since Henning neglected to add the large mintmark.[3] He also made counterfeit nickels dated 1939, 1946, 1947, and possibly 1953 as well as one other unidentified date.[4] It is estimated that more than 100,000 of Henning's nickels reached circulation. These can still be found in pocket change, and there is a thriving collectors' market for them, although owning a counterfeit is technically illegal. Henning dumped another 200,000 nickels in Copper Creek, New Jersey, of which only 14,000 were recovered. Another 200,000 are thought to have been dumped in the Schuylkill River. When caught, Henning was sentenced to 3 years in jail, and was required to pay a $5,000 fine.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel_(United_States_coin)
     
  20. JCro57

    JCro57 Making Errors Great Again

    Possible, yes. Likely, no way.
     
    micbraun likes this.
  21. JCro57

    JCro57 Making Errors Great Again

    Because these are absurdly rare, he posted no photos, and the likelyhood of him finding one in circulation is just not believable.
     
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