Difficult quiz - edges.

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by Insider, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. Dynoking

    Dynoking Well-Known Member

    This is what happens when I reply using my phone while on a 15 minute coffee break. Lesson learned.
    Now if I can be excused I need to go pull my foot out of my mouth.
     
    Stevearino and Kentucky like this.
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  3. ilmcoins

    ilmcoins Well-Known Member

    I enjoyed this quiz @Insider and I usually enjoy your insights. Just as I do some of the others that have commented here. Its too bad other forces entered this thread to knock it off the rails.
     
  4. ja59

    ja59 Missing the Beach just not as much as ...

    I enjoy reading "quiz" threads! Even though I usually have no idea to the answer. Nice to see something new, interesting and challenging in a thread!
     
    Kentucky likes this.
  5. halfcent1793

    halfcent1793 Well-Known Member

    It pretty much depends on how deep the crack goes into the die. If the piece is still attached, it's a die crack; if the piece has broken free, it's a retained cud.

    At least that's what we call them in the early copper world.
     
  6. Insider

    Insider Talent on loan from...

    halfcent1793, posted: "It pretty much depends on how deep the crack goes into the die. [You already know what I'm posting. I'm clarifying your post for others. When the die breaks, its severity (stated as depth here) does not matter. The almost invisible start of a die break is visible under magnification and will progress getting longer and more severe] If the piece is still attached, it's a die crack; if the piece has broken free, [IMO it is called a major die break] it's a retained cud ["cud" is an older term reserved for breaks that contact the rim in two places]. At least that's what we call them in the early copper world."

    IMG_0075.JPG

    Die breaks with internal large chip.

    IMG_1685.JPG

    Retained cud. The die is broken and the piece is still attached but sunken causing this characteristic to be raised slightly above the coin's surface.

    IMG_1731.JPG

    On this coin the part of the die with the design has broken off. Planchet metal filled the void.
     
    Stevearino and Dynoking like this.
  7. Mainebill

    Mainebill Wild Bill

    See I like this even though it was a trick question. Keep em coming. I’m always willing to learn. Yes I have a lot of experience and would consider myself a serious numismatist. But there’s always something new to learn no matter how much you already know. Or think you know
     
    Dynoking, Stevearino and bradgator2 like this.
  8. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    This looks like a lamination
    [​IMG]
     
  9. GDJMSP

    GDJMSP Numismatist Moderator

    In some ways yes. But when you look closely it becomes obvious that it isn't for a couple of reasons. For one a lamination cannot result in raised metal (the chips in the center of all that), nor can it result in the area affected also being raised metal that is solid.
     
    Kentucky and Stevearino like this.
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