Civil war era??

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by Brandon3545, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    Can anyone tell me about the paper money in the picture
     

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  3. Bradley Trotter

    Bradley Trotter Well-Known Member

    From what I can see in your photos, this is what you have.

    CSA 1864 $5 T-69

    Fractional Currency: Fifth Issue 25 Cents

    Fractional Currency: First Issue 3 Cents x2
     
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  4. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    That's awesome.... What does that mean lol
     
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  5. Bradley Trotter

    Bradley Trotter Well-Known Member

    Well, that depends. What would you like to know @Brandon3545?
     
  6. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    How commen are they
     
  7. Inspector43

    Inspector43 72 Year Collector Supporter

    Nice stuff. Is that a relative?
     
  8. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    No I have no idea who this guy is but I also have his Colt. I'm just trying to figure out exactly what it is I have in my possession
     
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  9. Bradley Trotter

    Bradley Trotter Well-Known Member

    Unfortunately, your notes are relatively common for the time period. The Confederate note is probably worth about $25 to $35, assuming the note has no major defects. The other notes are pieces of fractional currency. Fractional currency is also known as postal currency, and it was used as a stopgap measure in light of the scarcity of coins during the era. The 3-cent notes are probably worth about $15 to $20, while the 25-cent note is probably worth about $15 or more.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
  10. Inspector43

    Inspector43 72 Year Collector Supporter

    A picture of the Colt would be nice.
     
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  11. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    Lol I'm sure it would be
     
  12. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    Do you know anything about colts
     
  13. Inspector43

    Inspector43 72 Year Collector Supporter

    I am a gun collector and have ways to find out or put you in the right direction. If it is a Civil War Colt and you can trace it to a soldier who carried it during the war, it could be quite valuable. At least more so than one without provenance.

    Welcome to CT.
     
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  14. Bradley Trotter

    Bradley Trotter Well-Known Member

    You may wish to post your other items over in the General Discussion Forum. We have a few firearm enthusiasts and militaria collectors who may be able to help you on this board.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
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  15. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    I just got home I'll take a picture and post
     
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  16. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    Y'all are amazing here
     
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  17. tommyc03

    tommyc03 Senior Member

    I don't know anything about Colts, but I can say not to bring to Rick Harrison of Pawn Stars.;);)
     
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  18. scottishmoney

    scottishmoney Я люблю черных кошек Supporter

    Hmmm, Colts! 160+ year old weapons are super cool.
     
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  19. johnmilton

    johnmilton Well-Known Member

    The 25 cent fractional note is post Civil War. It’s from the 1870s.
     
  20. Brandon3545

    Brandon3545 Member

    So????
     

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  21. Bradley Trotter

    Bradley Trotter Well-Known Member

    @Brandon3545

    Since this man was a veteran of the Union army, you may wish to search the records of the Grand Army of the Republic. The GAR was one of the largest veterans groups in the United States after the American Civil War and hosted national events for Union veterans up through 1949.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
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