Castor & Pollux

Discussion in 'World Coins' started by Ripley, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. Ripley

    Ripley Senior Member

    Yeah... I know, thier wild, thier goofy looking and older than the dirt; they are often mistaken for. OK lets post those crazy Dioscuri twins Castor and Pollux kids. :p
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  3. maridvnvm

    maridvnvm Well-Known Member

    Istros, Silver stater
    Obv:- Facing male heads, left inverted
    Rev:- ΙΣΤΡΙΗ, sea-eagle grasping a dolphin with talons, A below dolphin
    Minted in Istros, 400 - 350 B.C.
    Reference:– AMNG I 416, SNG Cop 192 var (right head inverted), SGCV I 1669

    normal_Thrace_1b_img.jpg
     
  4. Ripley

    Ripley Senior Member

    Nice one Mari. Your collection is spectacular.
     
  5. medoraman

    medoraman Supporter! Supporter

    I always love the symbolism of greek coins once you start paying attention. I don't know about this city specifically, but I am pretty sure their symbol was an eagle, and they really didn't like a city with a symbol of a porpoise. :)
     
  6. Bing

    Bing Illegitimi non carborundum Supporter

    ANONYMOUS ROMAN REPUBLIC
    OBV: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, X
    REV: The Dioscuri galloping right; in exergue, ROMΛ in raised letters within linear frame
    Rome mint 214-13 BC
    19.8mm, 3.45g
    Crawford 44/5
    ANONYMOUS ROMAN REP OBV.jpg ANONYMOUS ROMAN REP REV.jpg
     
  7. Eng

    Eng Senior Eng

    Ripley, Martin, awesome coins, i've been looking at these for a while, so many coin so little money...:)
     
  8. mrweaseluv

    mrweaseluv Supporter! Supporter

    Hehe silly maybe but I hear those names and i think of Heinleins "The Rolling Stones" the main characters (or 2 of em anyway) are Cas and Pol Stone. Then again it's because of that book that i had to learn more about the originals as well... Who says SciFi rots your brains, it just leads you to read more interesting stuff.

    Great coins btw guys :D
     
  9. randygeki

    randygeki Coin Collector

    Roman Republic, C. Antestius, 146 B.C.

    Silver denarius, SRCV 95/1, Sydenham 411, Crawford 219/1e, RSC I Antestia 1, VF, Rome mint, weight 3.971g, maximum diameter 17.3mm, die axis 90o, 146 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in winged helmet, C ANTESTI behind, X below chin; reverse Dioscuri riding right, puppy with both fore feet raised below, ROMA in a linear frame in ex, linear border
     

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  10. Dionysos

    Dionysos Well-Known Member

    GREEK, Kingdom of Baktria, Eukratides I AR Tetradrachm
    (171-145 BC)
    Obv.: Diademed and draped bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull's horn and ear.
    Rev.: Dioskouroi on rearing horses right, holding palm fronds and spears; monogram in lower left field.
    Bopearachchi 6W var. (monogram to right); SNG ANS 469-471 var. (monogram to right).

    greek60.jpg
     
  11. Ancientnoob

    Ancientnoob Money Changer


    daaaaaannnnnnggggg!!!!!
     
  12. Ancientnoob

    Ancientnoob Money Changer

    I apologize I posted this a few times, but it always seems appropriate, and its one of my favorite coins.
    Denarius Commemorating the defeat of the Greeks..
    T. Quinctius Flamininus,
    AR denarius, 3.82g
    c. BC 126
    obverse: Helmeted head of Roma. Star, Flamen's cap behind.
    Reverse: Twin Horse back riders,Pollux & Castor over Macedonian shield TQ ROMA
    ref: Crawford 267/1; Syd 505.
     

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  13. Ancientnoob

    Ancientnoob Money Changer

    and I think everyone has one of these...
     

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  14. Ancientnoob

    Ancientnoob Money Changer

    Its interesting to think that if someone built a time machine, all of us could go back in time and at least buy something...or (with some of the coins I have seen posted)...someone...

    Its crazy to think about some of the purchasing power of these coins. I doubt the value on human life and morality had an effect on the people, imagine what lengths people must have gone through to possess our coins when they were circulated.
     
  15. Bing

    Bing Illegitimi non carborundum Supporter

    Anoob: I never get tired of seeing your coins posted. Beautiful.
     
  16. chrsmat71

    chrsmat71 I LIKE TURTLES!

    i'll post my coin my ya'lls, you coins will look even nicer.:smile

    here's my only cater and pollex..

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    [​IMG]

    kingdom of chalkis
    ptolemy tetrarch
    85-40bc
    cator and pollux:rev
    head of zeus: obv
     
  17. Windchild

    Windchild Punic YN, Shahanshah

    That may be, but to me, yours is the second most interesting, and therefore second best ;)

    Dionysos' Tet takes number 1... Man that is a beauty!
     
  18. miedbe7

    miedbe7 Wayward Collector

    When I saw this thread's title I immediately thought of the film Face/Off with John Travolta and Nicholas Cage. Cage's character was Castor and his younger, weaker brother was named Pollux. I wonder why they chose those names. Were these two mischief makers?
     
  19. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

  20. stevex6

    stevex6 Random Mayhem


    Man, Zeus knows all the tricks for pickin'-up the ladies, eh? (disguising himself as a swan ... why didn't I think of that!!?)

     
  21. stevex6

    stevex6 Random Mayhem

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