Canada

Discussion in 'World Coins' started by Siberian Man, Mar 1, 2018.

  1. Siberian Man

    Siberian Man Senior Member Moderator

    5 cents 1967, nickel, weight - 4,54 g., size - 21,21 mm, thickness - 1,7 mm, mintage - 36876574 pcs. Engravers: Arnold Machin (obverse - portrait of the Queen) and Alex Colville (reverse). Type: 100th Anniversary of Canada (1867-1967). Single release.
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  3. Siberian Man

    Siberian Man Senior Member Moderator

    10 cents 1960, silver .800, weight - 2,33 g., size - 18,034 mm, thickness - 1,1 mm, mintage - 45446835 pcs. Engravers: Mary Gillick (obverse - portrait of the King) and Emanuel Hahn. Such coins were released at 1953-64.
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  4. Siberian Man

    Siberian Man Senior Member Moderator

    10 cents 1967, silver .800, weight - 2,33 g., size - 18,034 mm, thickness - 1,21 mm, mintage - 62998215 pcs. Engravers: Arnold Machin (obverse - portrait of the Queen) and Emanuel Hahn (reverse). Type: 100th Anniversary of Canada (1867-1967). Single release.
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  5. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    The 2 metals the 1859 were made from was bronze and brass , hope this helps a bit. Dillan
     
  6. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    Some of the 1859 are worth a fair bit. There are 21 varieties of where they re-punched numbers and letters .Thanks Siberian man for posting some of the 1967 . I really like that years designs with the wolf on the 50 cent and the Bobcat on the 25cent , and the rabbit nickel is a favorite of the younger people. That year was Canada's 100th Birthday so the coins put out that year are specials for the 100th as you stated in your threads . nice job 1
     
  7. Bill in Burl

    Bill in Burl Collector

    "Some of the 1859 are worth a fair bit. There are 21 varieties of where ..."

    There are over 60 different dies that have repunched letters and digits, not 21, and over 200 different die marriages. I've collected 1859's for over 30 years and have nearly 1000 of them still (I used to have more than that). I have taught a large number of heavy variety collectors a great deal about 1859's and the varieties to be found there.
     
  8. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    Thanks for the correction , I just did a quick count of the lines but never counted the 10 or 15 different in each one of the lines in the book. Yes I have had a few of them , They are fairly common coin ,they are by no means rare or hard to find. thank you for the message.
     
  9. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    There will be certain ones that would be difficult to get ,being so many I am sure that some may be a lot harder to come across then some of the more common ones.
     
  10. Bill in Burl

    Bill in Burl Collector

    Dillan ... Yes, there are very scarce 1859's that may take years to find. What "book" are you referring to?
     
  11. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    A Guide to Canadian Coins and Tokens James Haxby seems pretty informative. official Whitman Guide Book
     
  12. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    The guide says there were 9,579,000 coins produced . It does not however specify how many of each different types there are . I think you stated 60 different types . Wow that is a lot to try and get together for 1 year. Lots of problems with the metal, presses , plates etc?
     
  13. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    Do you think you have most of what was minted , or are you still looking for certain ones.How many different ones in total do you think there is . You stated 200 different dies and then issues with those there could be several hundred styles.
     
  14. Bill in Burl

    Bill in Burl Collector

    Dillan ... As far a total mintage goes, there were 10 million ordered and, of the 10 million, you had 1858's, 9/8's and '59's. My person feeling, and those of other experts who have heavily studied the Provincial cents through mint and delivery records, is that there were way more than 421,000 1858's struck .. probably a million more than currently listed in books. Then there were 1/2 million or more of the 1859/8's, leaving only about 8 million or so 1859 narrow 9's.

    There were over 200 Reverse dies now catalogued and, possibly, up to 300 total reverse dies that were used. Because of the intricate design and the thin planchets, reverse dies were lucky to get 50,000 strikes .. some dies probably only struck less than 10,000 coins before destroying themselves. I would strongly suggest that you go to Haxby's 1859 site called Vickycents and start studying. It is facinating and I can suggest no better place to study than on that site. You should also go back and read some of the comments I've made in this thread. You don't need to be a die tracker to use the site .. there is great info there as well. The site is by the same guy whose book you are using .. Jim Haxby.
     
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  15. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    Thank you very much for all the info, I will have a look for sure and thank you so much for all the info. I have some 59s yet so I am going to dig them out and see if I can figure out which ones they actually are. I remember looking at these before and there was so much I think I finally just put them away with some more older pennies that I have . Thanks again .
     
  16. jj00

    jj00 Well-Known Member

    Not Philadelphia, 'P' was used to indicate Plating - or Copper Plated Steel.
     
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  17. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    I do believe that the RCM did contract work out to US mints at different times ,possibly during a major production run etc.?
     
  18. TheGame

    TheGame Well-Known Member

    Only for 1968 dimes.
     
  19. Siberian Man

    Siberian Man Senior Member Moderator

    Thank you very much!
     
  20. disarray

    disarray New Member

    Hello,
    My father is the owner of the one and only 1944 Tombac Canadian 5 Cent Piece (AKA Tombac Nickel.) As you may have read in the April 17th issue of the Canadian Coin News, he will be putting it up for auction on eBay this month. If you have an interest in following the auction, please send an email to tombacnickel@gmail.com to be added to the launch announcement list--You will be provided a link to the auction page.
    You can also follow @TombacNickel on Twitter for more info.
    Thank you
     
  21. Dillan

    Dillan The sky is the limit ! Supporter

    Thank you for all the information, I already have a few Tombacs . I also have a fair amount of the large and small pennies . I used to have some half cents ,bank coins etc. I used to sell on eBay under the name of lambarcl , it was my buyers name before I became a seller for a few years. I quit selling on eBay for a break from all the issues. I had a 100% rating and shipped everything within the 24 hrs it was purchased. This became a time consuming issue when I would get 19 or 20 sales over a weekend , and Monday morning have everything at the post office on the way. I really enjoyed the great people I met online it was the best part of the eBay experience. I think I still have about 100 large cents mostly King Edward and several of Queen Victoria left. Now I become a collector again. I sometimes did not like selling some of the coins but you either sell or collect . Keeping the good coins for myself , would have affected the sales for sure. That's great info ,some day I will be able to spend more time on research , and study the Canadian coins. Thank You. ( Hope your Dad does well with his 44 Tombac)
     
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