Burst my bubble

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Marie909, May 30, 2020.

  1. Marie909

    Marie909 Active Member

    Doubled die or die deterioration? 20200530_183227.jpg 20200530_183208.jpg 20200530_182349.jpg 20200530_182901.jpg
     
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  3. Marie909

    Marie909 Active Member

    I just found another one just like it in my roll, doubled die??
     
  4. gronnh20

    gronnh20 Well-Known Member

    Not a doubled die.

    Not a bad looking coin if you pulled that from circulation.
     
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  5. Marie909

    Marie909 Active Member

    Actually I didn't think so but here is another from same roll what caused this? 20200530_185027.jpg
     
  6. furryfrog02

    furryfrog02 Well-Known Member

  7. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    A worn Die.. :yack:
     
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  8. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh Supporter

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  9. Marie909

    Marie909 Active Member

    Thanks all, I wondered because I did notice the tiny lines next to the letters, signs of worn die, on to the next penny
     
  10. Kentucky

    Kentucky Supporter! Supporter

    If you notice, the "doubling" is not only flat and shelf-like, but is also all around the devices, making them look larger. As the die is used, the edges of the indentations that form the devices start to crumble and it starts to look like this.
     
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  11. Valentinian

    Valentinian Supporter! Supporter

    I come from the ancients forum. That sort of doubling is common in ancient coins and has nothing (in ancients) to do with a doubled die, rather a double strike. Imagine the sledgehammer coming down hard and bouncing once, with a fraction of a second for the position of the coin or die to move, so the second strike is almost aligned with the first, but not quite.

    Coming from the ancients forum I have difficulty understanding what is so interesting about a doubled die. What difference does it make, and why should we care, if a tiny shift of image is visible on a coin?
     
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  12. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh Supporter

    I know almost nothing about ancients. The modern mechanical minting process is totally different. What you described is similar to MD,
    Mechanical Doubling. Working dies, the ones striking coins, are made from working hubs. If the working hub shifts it will create a unique working die. Hopefully this will explain it.
    http://doubleddie.com/58201.html
     
  13. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh Supporter

  14. thomas mozzillo

    thomas mozzillo Well-Known Member

    Coming from the ancients forum I have difficulty understanding what is so interesting about a doubled die. What difference does it make, and why should we care, if a tiny shift of image is visible on a coin?[/QUOTE]

    @Valentinian. Many collectors don't care too much about "a tiny shift of image" on a coin. We're all looking for something like this:
    upload_2020-5-31_1-6-6.png
    Most of us realize it's a pipe dream. lol :D:singing:
     
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  15. Marie909

    Marie909 Active Member

    Well for me it is interesting because it is a challenge to find, so many taken out of circulation
     
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