Bob L.'s Top 15 Not-Coins of 2019

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Bob L., Dec 6, 2019.

  1. Bob L.

    Bob L. Well-Known Member

    Fifteen of my fave not-coins, below. (I'll attempt ten in the first post, five more after)

    My collecting focus took a wrong turn at Albuquerque this year, and ended up in Western Asia three thousand years ago. (Yeah, yeah, I know: a left turn at Albuquerque wouldn’t account for the temporal distortion within the space/time continuum) Most are my pics – but, as I’ve not had a chance to photo many of my more recent acquisitions, some are sellers’ pics. Been a very active buying year – so it was tough narrowing this down.

    No particular order here - I like 'em all equally.

    1.
    1. _dagger-4.jpg
    AE dagger
    Northwestern Iran (probably Luristan)
    1200-800 BC
    32cm (12.6”)

    Cf. Khorasani (Bronze and Iron Weapons from Luristan), Fig. 2 (page 212)
    Cf. Moorey (Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum), Pl. 6, #50; (also illustrated on page 70)
    Cf. Overleat (The Early Iron Age in the Pusht-I Kuh, Luristan), Fig. 184, #KT.A6-19 (page 216)

    From an old British collection, acquired in the 1970s

    Description:
    Flanged hilt with no wood or ivory remaining, single rivet hole in wedge-shaped pommel, low broad midrib, blade and hilt cast in one piece


    2.
    2. 1_helios-blade.jpg
    AE sword (handle lost to time)
    Northwestern Iran (possibly Luristan)
    1200-800 BC
    54.5cm (21 ½”)

    Cf. Mahboubian (Art of Ancient Iran), 397i (similar rectangular open guard)
    Cf. Moorey (Catalogue of Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum) Plate 7, # 61 (for similar guard); Fig. 8, #63 (for similar blade)


    3.
    3. Dagger_1 ns c.jpg
    AE dagger
    Canaanite
    Early to mid 2nd millennium BC
    17cm (6.7”)

    Ex- Shlomo Zeitsov Collection

    Description:
    Sold by the collector’s nephew, who reports that it was found in Israel. It is tang-less and has three rivet holes, of which only one remains fully encircled by bronze.


    4.
    4. Dagger_3 ns b.jpg
    AE dagger
    Western Asia (possibly Luristan)
    1200-800 BC
    33cm (13”)

    Cf. Mahboubian (Art of Ancient Iran: Copper and Bronze), 379
    Cf. Malloy (Weapons: Ancient and Medieval Art and Antiquities), Fig. 53
    Cf. Overleat (The Early Iron Age in the Pusht-I Kuh, Luristan), Pl. 89 (Kutal-i Gulgul, tomb A9), Fig. A9-60

    Description:
    Flanged hilt with no wood or ivory remaining, blade and hilt cast in one piece


    5.
    5. Dagger_2 ns b.jpg
    AE dagger
    Western Asia (possibly Marlik or other site in/around Gilan, Iran)
    2nd millennium BC
    29.5cm (11.6”)

    Cf. Negahban, (Weapons from Marlik) Pl. X, Fig. 128

    Ex- Johan Dæhnfeldt collection

    Description:
    Long triangular ribbed blade, squared shoulders, four rivet holes (two rivets still in place), broken tang


    6.
    6. dagger_az.jpg
    AE dagger
    Northwestern Iran (possibly Marlik)
    1200-800 BC
    31.5cm (12.4”)

    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Pl. V, Fig. 55

    Ex. Danish Private Collection

    Description:
    Triangular blade, very broad at base, blade with diamond-shaped cross-section, flanged hilt with no wood or ivory remaining


    7.
    7. Dagger_Short_Sword_2 ns c.jpg
    AE dagger/short sword
    Northwestern Iran
    1200-800 BC
    37.7cm (14.8”)

    Cf. Muscarella (Bronze and Iron, Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in the Metropolitan Museum of Art), Fig. 164 (page 99)
    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Fig. 41 (page 59)
    Cf. Petrie (Tools and Weapons), Plate XXXVI, Fig. 170

    From a private Danish collection of ancient weapons

    Description:
    Long tapering form, winged guard extending from the ricasso, prominent midrib, chips along one edge


    8.
    8. Dagger_Short_Sword_3 ns b.jpg
    AE dagger/short sword
    Western Asia (possibly northwestern Iran)
    1200-800 BC
    41.5cm (16.3”)

    Cf. Malloy (Weapons: Ancient and Medieval Art and Antiquities), Fig. 62

    From a private Danish collection of ancient weapons

    Description:
    Rounded shoulders and broad, flat central midrib curving outward at shoulders, tang broken, some roughness, chips, and encrustations


    9.
    9. Hilt ccf.jpg
    AE hilt (of a dagger or sword)
    Northwestern Iran
    1200-800 BC
    11.1cm (4.4”)

    For similar pommels and grips:
    Cf. Moorey (Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum), plate 7, #58, 60
    Cf. Mahboubian (Art of Ancient Iran), 392 and 397a

    Description:
    Double disk pommel, cylindrical grip, iron core, bronze exterior, incised with decorative patterns


    10.
    10. Spearhead_6 ns b.jpg
    AE spearhead or dagger blade
    Western Asia (possibly Luristan or Marlik)
    1200-800 BC
    32.9cm (13”)

    Cf. Muscarella (Bronze and Iron, Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in the Metropolitan Museum of Art), Fig. 392 (dagger)
    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Pl. IX, Fig. 119

    Description:
    Rounded shoulders, pronounced midrib, slightly concave edges, long tang
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
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  3. Bob L.

    Bob L. Well-Known Member

    Continuing...

    11.
    11. Sword_1 ns b.jpg
    AE sword
    Northwestern Iran, Talish area
    1200-800 BC
    45.5cm (18”)

    Cf. Muscarella (Bronze and Iron, Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in the Metropolitan Museum of Art), Fig. 165 (page 99)
    Cf. Watson (Luristan Bronzes in Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery), Fig. 16, #54 (page 24)

    From an old Cambridge collection

    Description:
    Tapering ribbed blade, round shoulders, rat-tail tang, tip missing and end bent (possibly a deliberate act in antiquity)


    12.
    12. Spearhead_11 ns b.jpg
    AE spearhead
    Western Asia (probably northwestern Iran)
    1200-800 BC
    38.5cm (15.4”)

    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Pl. VI, Fig. 80

    Ex- Johan Dæhnfeldt Collection

    Description:
    Tapered long blade with prominent midrib, sharper tapering near point, round shoulders


    13.
    13. Spearhead_9 ns b.jpg
    AE spearhead
    Western Asia (probably northwestern Iran, possibly Marlik)
    1200-800 BC
    38.5cm (15.4”)

    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Pl. VI, Figs. 79, 80

    Ex- Johan Dæhnfeldt Collection

    Description:
    Ovate blade with curved shoulders, sharper tapering near point, flat midrib, and squared-sectioned tang


    14.
    14. Spearhead_7 ns b.jpg
    AE spearhead or dagger blade
    Western Asia (possibly northwestern Iran, possibly Marlik)
    1200-800 BC
    30cm (11.8”)

    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Pl. IX, Fig. 116
    Cf. Piller (Untersuchungen zur relative Chronologie der Nekropole von Marlik), Table XII, Type IB (page 289)

    Description:
    Rounded shoulders, pronounced midrib, rivet hole in tang


    15.
    15. SC socketed spearhead.jpg
    AE spearhead
    Northwestern Iran
    Mid-2nd millennium BC
    24.5cm (9.6”)

    Cf. Negahban (Weapons from Marlik), Pl. XI, Fig. 139
    Cf. Moorey (Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum), Pl. 5, Fig. 41 (type also illustrated on page 67)

    Ex. Johan Dæhnfeldt Estate Collection

    Description:
    Triangular socketed blade, pronounced midrib, high shoulders
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
  4. Bing

    Bing Illegitimi non carborundum Supporter

    Fantastic collection!
     
  5. Theodosius

    Theodosius Unrepentant Fine Style Freak! Supporter

    Wow, really cool pieces.

    What an interesting collection.

    John
     
  6. Sulla80

    Sulla80 one coin at a time Supporter

    Interesting artifacts - very cool and I imagine a challenge to fit in 2x2 flips or Abafil trays. Best wishes for whichever direction you turn in 2020.
     
    Orange Julius likes this.
  7. Bob L.

    Bob L. Well-Known Member

    Thanks, all. It really is a fascinating collecting area. Much fun.
     
    Alegandron likes this.
  8. Sir Coin Collector

    Sir Coin Collector New Member

    I especially like the intact hilt of the dagger in the #1 spot. They are all absolutely amazing pieces of history. Thank you for sharing.
     
  9. Nicholas Molinari

    Nicholas Molinari Well-Known Member

  10. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    I enjoy collections of cool not-coin Ancients. Well done, @Parthicus !

    Lotta cool sharp instruments. I have not graduated to Daggers and Swords yet. I am still at the Razor stage ...

    [​IMG]
    Ancient Celtic Shaving Razor 8th-6th c BCE Rare Bronze Age Hallstatt Type 48mm x 40mm
     
    chrsmat71, Parthicus, Bing and 3 others like this.
  11. Bob L.

    Bob L. Well-Known Member

    Thanks, Deacon Ray! LOL

    I guess we Parthian collectors are pretty much interchangeable.

    Seriously, neat artifact, Alegandron. The redirected focus this year definitely slowed down the coin collecting for me. But, as this is CT, I feel obligated to add a recent addition of the numismatic variety.

    normal_Van__t_Haaff_9_1_1-7_Kamnaskires_V_tetradrachm_(c).jpg
    Kamnaskires V
    AR tetradrachm, 54 - 32 BC
    Van't Haaff 9.1.1-7

    Thinking about breaking it free...
     
  12. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    Aww, HAIL Yes! Break it free!

     
  13. Nicholas Molinari

    Nicholas Molinari Well-Known Member

    If you find yourself with a duplicate of one of these spears or daggers (from an upgrade, etc.), let me know—I’d like to get one of these but do not have the time to research the purchase.
     
  14. Spaniard

    Spaniard Well-Known Member

    Wonderful collection Bob!....I love the patinas these artifacts obtain..
    That number 15 is something special!...But also really like the 1, 4 and 6 aswell!
    I'm sure I can see some dry blood on a couple though:nailbiting:
    Congrats on a beautiful collection....Nice Tet too!
     
  15. rrdenarius

    rrdenarius non omnibus dormio Supporter

    Great collecting year @Bob L. !
    You have several that look similar from your pics. Can you take one pic that shows them all? I like that you have one handle. Do you have iron as well as bronze?
    My bronze pieces are much smaller and broken.
    DSCN0173 bronze axes.JPG
    two bronze axes (on left ex McCabe collection)

    bronze axe knife in new light.JPG
    broken bronze axe and knife with 3 other cast bronze pieces.
     
  16. panzerman

    panzerman Well-Known Member

    Love them! WOW!!!!

    You really have a fine "edged weapons" collection! I have some too/ nothing comes close to yours:shame:
    John
     
  17. Bob L.

    Bob L. Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the comments, all. Most appreciated.

    Rrdenarius, very interesting group of AE artifacts - thanks for sharing! Unfortunately I won't have time to gather up everything for a group shot, much as I like the idea. The first round influx of the annual sibs-in-law holiday-time houseguests arrives tomorrow (I'll have two airport runs after work) - and so, other than an occasional peek at the PC monitor during breaks from cleaning the house today - I just won't have the time to gather up the weapons.

    You're right that some can look similar - differences can in some cases be subtle: profile, tang length, tang versus socket, cross-section shape, midrib or not, etc. Having access to some good reference materials, to navigate this complicated area, is important. But, even armed with those references, there are challenges. If interested, see the second entry (the parts dealing with typological similarities and ambiguous usages) I posted here:
    https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=119753.0

    My collecting criteria include: no (or very, very little evident) bronze disease (a big problem with these types of things - and, yes, rrdenarius, I only collect bronze artifacts), affordability, items must originate in Western Asia - and preferably northwestern Iran and its immediate environs (the collection started to provide context for my Parthian and Elymaean coins by looking at the regional antecedents of Parthia), and good provenance. I have been lucky enough to snag specimens from some important weapons collections including those of Johan Dæhnfeldt, Walter Steinberg, Axel Guttman, Shlomo Zeitsov, and Marcel Gibrat. I hope to eventually pick up an ex-John Piscopo - his was a very important collection.

    I have been on a bit of a buying spree, and so I have a number of items waiting to be photographed and properly cataloged, then eventually uploaded to my online gallery. (Last summer I posted the first round of pickups at Forum) Although the group above represents my "tops" from 2019 - I should mention that 2019 was also my first year collecting these things. The upload of round two is still months away. I just don't have the time to devote to the photography during the academic year. (I teach in a very busy department) By next May, for sure, I'll get another round loaded up.
     
    rrdenarius and Nicholas Molinari like this.
  18. chrsmat71

    chrsmat71 I LIKE TURTLES!

    Wow, that's an awesome collection of cool weapons for just starting this year! That pommel is pretty awesome, seems like you don't see those very often. Of course, I don't know anything about these artifacts, just thinking of pictures I have seen. Maybe most of the hilts were wood and have rotted away?
     
  19. Bob L.

    Bob L. Well-Known Member

    Yes, Chris - wood or bone. Thanks for the comments.
     
  20. Al Kowsky

    Al Kowsky Supporter! Supporter

    Bob L., Thanks for displaying examples from your impressive collection of ancient weapons :D! I'm especially impressed with #1,2,4,6, & 15. Four years ago I bought at auction a bronze dagger from the estate of John Piscopo, identified as "Luristan", Northwestern Iran, circa 1200 - 900 BC, 13.15 in. long, see photos below. Does that attribution seem accurate to you? Are you familiar with the collection Piscopo assembled or have anything that was in his collection?

    IMG_8183.JPG IMG_8185.JPG 42516915_2_x.jpg
     
    Bob L. and Sir Coin Collector like this.
  21. Finn235

    Finn235 Well-Known Member

    Super collection Bob! From an archaeological standpoint, how are these normally found? None show obvious signs of battle, so grave goods or weapons caches?
     
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