Another "Laodicea mint" denarius of Julia Domna

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Roman Collector, Oct 13, 2018.

  1. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Won this one today at auction for a good price. One doesn't come across this one every day. It's an obverse and reverse die-match to the specimen in the British Museum, too!

    These Severan issues were formerly attributed to Laodicea but, as we've discussed previously, modern scholarship assigns them to the mint in Antiochia ad Orontem. Coins of Julia Domna from this mint can be distinguished by the presence of a loop at the base of her neck, above the shoulder.

    Post your Antioch mint Severans or whatever you feel is relevant!

    Domna CERERI FRVGIF denarius Laodicea.jpg
    Julia Domna, AD 193-217.
    Roman AR denarius, 3.87 g, 18 mm, 6 h.
    Antioch, AD 196-202 (or later).
    Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust, right.
    Rev: CERERI FRVGIF, Ceres seated left, holding corn-ears in right hand and long vertical torch in left hand.
    Refs: RIC 636; BMCRE 592; Cohen 14; RCV --; CRE 300.

    The specimen in the British Museum with which it is a die-match:

    Domna CERERI FRVGIF denarius Laodicea BMC.jpg
     
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  3. Sallent

    Sallent Supporter! Supporter

    I do have an S. Severus from this mint, and what a beauty it is...

    Septimius Severus Laodicea Mint.jpg
    Septimius Severus 193-211
    AR Denarius 17mm. 3.55g. Laodicea mint. A.D 198-202
    L SEPT SEEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head of Septimius Severus right
    VICTORIAE A[V]GG FEL, Victory advancing left, holding open wreath over shield set on low base
    RIC 516; RSC 719
     
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  4. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Oh, yes! That IS a beauty!
     
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  5. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    Last time this came up we asked the basis of the change and who is responsible for the study on which the change is based. I'm still for calling it "The Mint Formerly Known as Laodicea" and suggest a contest to design a symbol to replace the names. Did he change come with a full study of the questions that have come with this mint and 'Emesa' for the entire time I have collected them or did someone decide to make a name for themselves by disparaging Mattingly and his 'guess'?

    I my favorite Domna from this mint from this mint or from another mint by the same or different name?
    rk5440bb0525.jpg
     
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  6. gsimonel

    gsimonel Well-Known Member

    I still have this coin assigned to Laodicea on my web page. Perhaps it's time to defer to the "modern scholarship"?
    [​IMG]
    Provincial Silver Denarius
    Laodicea ad Mare mint, A.D. 196-202
    Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA
    Rev: CONCORDIA - Concordia, seated left, holding patera and double cornucopiae
    RIC (Septimius Severus) 637
    18mm, 3.7g.
     
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  7. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    The most intellectually honest thing to do -- and I think @dougsmit would agree -- is to attribute it to an "unknown Syrian mint."
     
  8. gogili1977

    gogili1977 Well-Known Member

    Julia Domna - Concordia
    050-05.jpg

    Is there a similar rule when it comes to the denarii of Septimius as for Domna "presence of a loop at the base of her neck"?
     
  9. maridvnvm

    maridvnvm Well-Known Member

    Though I suspect that there are many "unknown Syrian mints."

    I have had a couple of these Ceres..

    A possible reverse die to the OP?

    [​IMG]

    A different style staff.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Yes, it is!
     
  11. maridvnvm

    maridvnvm Well-Known Member

    It looks as though the BM has reallocated Emesa to Cappadocia too. So another "unknown Syrian mint"?
     
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