Ancients => Post your Favourite coin and *Favourite tune*

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by stevex6, Mar 22, 2014.

  1. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE

    Thank you Sir!
     
    +VGO.DVCKS likes this.
  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    Well, thanks Right Back At you.
    ...I dearly love Tuvan Kargyraa (sp?). Believe it or not, there was a window of maybe four months when I could do Kargyraa and falsetto (think Al Green, Chil-Lites and Delfonics) on the same day. (I'm kind of baritone, I guess.) ...Politically incorrect as it is, one of my favorite lines of Samuel Johnson (from conversation; Boswell's Life) is something like, 'Sir, a woman preaching is like a dog walking on its hind legs. It is not done well, but you are surprised to see it done at all.'
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2022
  4. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE

    When my oldest Daughter was in HS, she was part of an elite chorus that was considered best in the State. Their Instructor was incredible. They performed a song(?) where the base sound was throat song. The upper higher sounds were a nasal sound that all harmonized. It was an exercise that lasted around 10 minutes or so. However, as they more and more harmonized, it was as if the sounds were projected and originated 20 or so feet (7m) above their heads. Almost like mass ventriloquism. Incredible performance, and an incredible experience how sound waves can be projected. It was an experience of a lifetime. The Instructor explained that over his last 30 years of teaching, he had very few (perhaps 2 or 3) groups of Students that could produce this. This group pulled it off, and he stated was perhaps his best.
     
  5. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    That's just Too Good, @Alegandron. Hope your daughter ran with that.
    ...Here's my one and only representative camp-gate AE, of Crispus. I got it mainly as precedent for the Carolingian and early Capetian deniers of Orleans.
    CRISPUS, CAMP GATE, OBV., CF. ORLEANS.jpg CRISPUS, CAMP GATE, REV., CF. ORLEANS.jpg Here's my earliest example of Orleans, Charles the Bald, c. 843-877.
    CAROLINGIAN, CAMP GATE, CHARLES II, ORLEANS.jpg
    And for no particular reason, here's some favorite, old-timey Jamaican nyabinghi drumming. (For reasons I still don't fully understand, the Rasta Bible is the King James Version. ...Where, may the record show, 'Yah(/-wheh)' is rendered "Jah" around half a dozen times that I ever found.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2022
  6. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    @Heliodromus, Thank you, that's More of The S--t.
    Brilliant coin, too. I for one had exactly no idea that that reverse motif goes all the way back to Constantine I.
     
  7. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    Needs saying, @Roman Collector, that's an especially good match between the (Very solid) coin and the music.
    ...Right, after Ray Charles covered the song, so did Van Morrison. Both are worth sitting in front of, but the original is pretty good, too.
     
    Roman Collector likes this.
  8. ancientone

    ancientone Well-Known Member

    Not really an association between these two other than new favs.



    Tegea.jpg
    Arkadia, Tegea. Caracalla AE20. Pan standing facing, head l., holding lagobolon.

    Tegea is one of the scarcest Peloponnesian provincial mints.
     
  9. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    @ancientone, I'd never heard of this band. Had to Wiki 'em. They kick stuff all over the block.
    The coin is pretty great, too.
     
    ancientone likes this.
  10. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    @Roman Collector, Just Fine --the coin pretty emphatically included. From here, Roman Provincial as late as the 3rd c. CE (besides Alexandrian tets) still has that much novelty value.
    ...Except, some UB40 even earlier than this warrants a measure of attention (from 'Signing Off').
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2022
    Roman Collector likes this.
  11. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    COINS, FRANCE, LA MARCHE, ANNULET 3, OBV..jpg
    COINS, FRANCE, LA MARCHE, ANNULET 3, REV..jpg
    France, County of La Marche. Hugues IX and Hugues X de Lusignan (1199-1219, 1219-1249). Denier of La Marche.
    Obv. +VGO COMES.
    Rev. Crosslet; crescents and annulets above and below. +MARCHIE (annulet).
    Duplessy 960.
    I dearly love this thread, and need to belatedly thank @stevex6 for starting it.
    By way of conveying my gratitude, here’s one, longer than anyone else has lacked the common sense not to post.
    Hugh /Hugues X is one of my favorite French rogue barons of the earlier 13th century. Along with Pierre ‘Mauclerc’ de Dreux, sometime count /duke of Brittany (by marriage), and Renaud de Dammartin, about whom I and other people have posted, he’s a poster child for the baronial response to the dramatic and, at least with eight centuries of hindsight, inexorable expansion of royal power, both territorially and administratively, which began to seriously accelerate under Philippe II. …It would take Edward III, and the earlier phases of the Hundred Years’ War, to reverse the trend in the following century (...and, Oh, Right, the Black Death). Back to the earlier 13th, the number of coordinated baronial revolts in France evoke those in England under King John, as they complemented them in real time. Part of the contrast, both in the tactics and their longer-term effects, involves the fact that, from the Conquest, the Anglo-Norman aristocracy were allotted estates scattered across England …and had to think on a national scale. By this time, the French baronage had a quarter millennium of concentrated territorial power, with attendant levels of local autonomy. Ironically or not, their corresponding response was always regional –and Philippe II, along with Philippe III and Louis IX, were always, ultimately able to ‘divide and conquer.’

    For Hugues X, I’m cutting and pasting part of a paper which (to quote myself …nope, too fast to stop me) is likely to be unfinished when I’m not.

    Based in northern Aquitaine, near the center of the Angevin and Capetian frontier, the Lusignans were notorious for serial plots and counterplots against both royal dynasties. These saw their late apogee in the comital reign of Hugues X (1219-1249). Poitou’s relative remoteness from the Capetian royal demesne allowed the region –under Angevin rule since the mid-12th century– to evade Philippe II’s much more definitive conquest (1204) of the Angevin possessions to its north (Baldwin, Philip Augustus 238-9). Until 1242, it remained, in Petit-Dutaillis’s memorable phrase, a “cockpit of intermittent hostilities and feudal anarchy” (222). Painter no less succintly describes Hugues’s motives for perpetuating this state of affairs: “Hugh [...]’s fundamental objects were to make himself absolute master of Poitou and to escape as much as possible from the control of his suzerain. Hence he preferred to give his allegiance to the weakest government he could find” (biography of Pierre ‘Mauclerc,’ 43).

    The tenor of this assessment was shared by contemporaries and near contemporaries on both sides of the Channel. Matthew Paris’s brief notice of Hugh X’s death on St. Louis’s first crusade is framed in terms of expiation for “all his […] crimes” (see below); Guillaume de Saint-Pathus’s Life of Saint Louis characterizes him as “full of vanity and presumption” (quoted in Le Goff, Saint Louis 278). On his accession to the county of La Marche, Hugues allied with the minority government of Henry III. By the early summer of 1224, he had been bought off by Louis VIII of France, although Hallam notes that he was already “moving back towards support of the English.” [Footnotes omitted, as elsewhere.] In 1226, on the accession of Louis IX, he joined an ill-fated baronial coalition against the Capetian regent, Blanche of Castile, formally renewing his alliance with Henry III in the process. Ten years later, he allied with Thibaut IV of Champagne during the latter’s machinations against Louis IX. In 1241, he was again in revolt against the Capetians, “deserting” a fresh alliance with Henry III only after the decisive defeat of Henry’s invasionary force in the following year.

    Predictably, this latest of Hugues’s intrigues managed to alienate both royal families. In the immediate aftermath of his desertion, Henry III sent a letter to Friedrich II of Germany, drawing another explicitly Biblical parallel:

    "Hugh, Count of La Marche, and [his colleague] Reginald of Pons betrayed us. Reginald of Pons bade us farewell and, giving us a Judas kiss, went to do the treachery he had planned. [...W]e could not remain longer among that false and lying people of Poitou without danger of our body...."

    Matthew Paris says of Hugues, who briefly predeceased his son, Hugues XI, on the same, initial crusade of Louis IX (obit. 1249 and 1250, respectively), “[...] it is to be charitably believed that he prudently expiated this crime and all his other sins on this pilgrimage.” ((120-) 121.) Hugues pere had taken the cross in the immediate aftermath of his pardon by Louis, accompanied by the surrender of several castles to the Crown, and a large annual indemnity.
    HERALDRY, CF. MORGAN BIBLE, LUSIGNAN, LA MARCHE, MS. BIBLE ILLUSTRATION.jpg

    A French commentary on the Epistles, c. second quarter of the 13th century: From the British Library website: http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/ILLUMIN.ASP?Size=mid&IllID=16782

    The historiated initial provides a resonant graphic foil both to Matthew Paris’s characteristically acerbic prose, and Henry III’s histrionics. A New Testament theme is reworked using an unmistakably contemporaneous coat of arms, here with equally unmistakable editorial overtones. The result is a remarkably cogent example of the capacity of medieval visual language not only to expound, but to expand on the available textual evidence. It dramatically combines a well known coat of arms with a Biblical character, albeit an anonymous one. In the historiated initial, St. Paul’s jailer has the arms of the Lusignan counts of La Marche. This from a period when heraldry was already, very literally a visual language –like medieval symbolism in other media; explicitly denotive, and correspondingly specific in its content.
    (End of (slightly edited) quote.)

    …Right, so finally we’re at the place where you get the tune. This landed on me last night. It was So right. …The video is one of my favorites of all time; the dance moves always crack me up. And the trombonist --Kicking Bottom, or What? ...And (edit: ) Yike, there are Two Threads about variously "old" and "favorite" tunes! I so seriously got to this party too late....
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2022
    GinoLR, akeady, ancientone and 2 others like this.
  12. robinjojo

    robinjojo Well-Known Member

    D-Camera Elizabeth I Crown, mm 1, 1602, Touch-up,  8-24-20.jpg


     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2022
    ancientone, Voldemort, GinoLR and 3 others like this.
  13. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    Mag-Smegging-Nificent shilling, @robinjojo. On that broad of a flan, the strike is as impressive as the engraving. ...Especially in contrast to all the examples of Charles I that you see, with the portrait as flat as a pancake.
    I can only wish I had pics of my half groat, the only example of Elizabeth I still have, but a little beauty. But this is a fair complement to Respighi and Ozawa.
     
    robinjojo likes this.
  14. robinjojo

    robinjojo Well-Known Member

    Thanks!

    The coin is actually a crown, from 1602/03.
     
    +VGO.DVCKS likes this.
  15. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    A Crown. Yikes. You see where my frame of reference (summarily) ends? No wonder the strike is so amazing. How thick is the flan?
     
  16. robinjojo

    robinjojo Well-Known Member

    The coin is 3mm thick and 40mm wide. The weight is 29.94 grams.

    I've owned this crown since the late 1980s, originally purchased from Charlie Wyatt of San Diego, CA.
     
    +VGO.DVCKS likes this.
  17. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    Wow. Amazing. This takes me all the way back to when I was a kid, c. earlier '70s, at a modest, local, small-town coin show. Improbably enough, there were a couple of Brits --right, now I wish I could remember who they were. They had amazing stuff, none of which I could begin to contemplate buying. But one of them made sure that I saw their Civil War -era, coined silver pound (Oxford?) of Charles I. What I remember best is his repeating the word, "pound," with appropriate emphasis. Visually, it had essentially the same motifs as a crown. But you could serve hors d'ouvres on it. Round, but otherwise evoking Scandinavian plate money.
     
  18. ancientone

    ancientone Well-Known Member

    Canadian Celtic punk band The Real McKinzies sing about storming the beach at Normandy in 1944.


    CoelaMaximus.jpg
    Maximus Caesar AE19 of Coela, Thrace. (IVL VE) MAXIMVS, laureate bust right / AEL MVNCIPI COELA, prow left, cornucopiae above.
     
  19. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    This fifty-year-old song has been an earworm all weekend. It reminds me of grade school.



    And here's a favorite coin.

    [​IMG]
    Diva Faustina II, AD 147-175.
    Roman orichalcum sestertius, 25.23 g, 30.2 mm, 11 h.
    Rome, early AD 176.
    Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, veiled and draped bust, right.
    Rev: CONSECRATIO S C, Faustina II carried by an eagle flying left, holding transverse scepter in her right hand and with veil decorated with stars floating above her head.
    Ref: RIC 1701; BMC 1572; Cohen 68; RCV 5226; MIR –; Cayón p.153, 32.
     
  20. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter



    One of most sharp-dressed men in Roman numismatics was Probus. Here he is in his consular robes.

    [​IMG]
    Probus, AD 276-282.
    Roman billon antoninianus, 4.15 g, 22.05 mm, 6 h.
    Serdica, 4th officina, 4th emission, AD 277.
    Obv: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust, left, in imperial mantle, holding eagle-tipped scepter.
    Rev: SOLI INVICTO, Sol, in spread quadriga, raising right hand and holding whip in left hand; -/-//KAΔ.
    Refs: RIC 861 H; RCV 12040 var. (bust).
     
  21. ancientone

    ancientone Well-Known Member



    pappa.jpg
    Pisidia, Pappa-Tiberia. Antoninus Pius AE23
    Obv: AVT KAIC AΔP-ANTωNINOC, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right.
    Rev: TIBЄPIЄω-N-ΠAΠΠHNωN, Mên standing right, crescent at shoulders, left foot on pinecone, scepter in right hand, pinecone in left.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page