WTS: Ancient Coins Marked Down to Sell, Greek and Roman

Discussion in 'For Sale' started by John Anthony, Jun 11, 2021.

  1. John Anthony

    John Anthony Ultracrepidarian Supporter

    Hello friends, here are some coins that have been sitting on my shelf for a while, so I'm putting them on sale. Tracked shipping in the US is an extra $5, international shipping is whatever the post office charges me. Payment by Paypal (+3.6%), MO, check, or Wise. I have 100% positive feedback on eBay over eight years of sales and I offer a lifetime guarantee of authenticity. PM me if interested and happy collecting! :)

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    LOT 1. Prior to the invention of bronze token coinage, Archaic Greek silver was struck in small denominations that made for some truly lilliputian coins. Here is an example from 5th century BC Kyzikos, a tetartemorion, or 1/8 obol. Most of you are familiar with this type in larger denominations – they are readily available as obols and hemiobols, see vcoins here. Smaller sizes are altogether rare (probably because they would have been very easy to lose), and they're typically quite rough. See CNG here for a few examples, but note that for some curious reason, not every coin CNG calls a tetartemorion is actually so – many of those coins are twice as heavy, making them common hemiobols.

    At any rate, here's a miniature jewel – the finest of these types I've found in the smallest denomination, and one of the most appealing tetartemoria I've ever found of any type. The strike is very well-centered, the surfaces smooth and clean, the circulation wear minimal. $135 (reduced from $150)

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    MYSIA, Kyzikos. Circa 450-400 BC.
    AR Tetartemorion, 0.20g, 7.5 mm.
    Obv.: Forepart of boar left; tunny to right.
    Rev.: Head of roaring lion left within incuse square.
    Reference: Von Fritze II 10; SNG France 373.

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    LOT 2. Hiketas II was tyrant of Syracuse from 287 -278 BC. Read a brief history here. Zeus Hellanios can be translated as “the Zeus worshipped by all Greeks.” He appears almost exclusively on Sicilian coinage from c. 290 to 260 BC. He is not depicted with his typical beard, and therefore sometimes confused with Apollo. In fact, Zeus Hellanios is considered the “Bringer of Rains,” referring to a legend in which Aikus, king of Aigina, implored the deity to avert drought and barrenness in the land of Greece. Why certain Sicilian cities embraced this aspect of Zeus during this particular span of 30 years is unknown. Were they struggling with a drought of their own? It’s a question worth investigating.

    At any rate, here is a stunning bronze in beautiful style, as struck from fresh dies, never circulated, and exhibiting a rich, dark patina. This coin was obviously collected the moment it came off the dies. Examples of this quality often hammer over $300 at CNG before fees, scroll through these pages to get an idea. One of the most beautiful ancient coins I’ve handled. $160 (reduced from $180)

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    SICILY. Syracuse.
    Hiketas II. 287-278 BC.
    AE25, 9.7g, 12h; struck c. 283-279 BC.
    Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus Hellanios right.
    Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings displayed.
    Reference: HGC 2, 1449 (p. 376).
    From the Stevearino Collection, ex-JAZ Numismatics, ex Theodosius.

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    LOT 3. Rhodes is the largest of the Dodecanese Islands of Greece. In the ancient world, it was famous for the Colossus of Rhodes, a large, bronze statue of the sun god Helios – one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Here is Helios on a didrachm struck in the 3rd century BC. This coin is well-centered with a great bust, a little roughness, and a little ancient dirt. In such an appealing condition, it would run you at least $300 at vcoins compare here. $185 (reduced from $220)

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    ISLANDS OFF CARIA. Rhodes.
    AR Didrachm, 21mm, 6.1g, 12h; 250-229 BC.
    Obv.: head of Helios facing slightly right.
    Rev.: MNAΣIMAXOΣ above rose with bud to right; Athena Nikephoros standing below left, P-O either side of stem.
    Reference: Ashton 208
    From the Theodosius Collection

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    LOT 4. If you have any interest in Roman Republic bronze coinage, you'll know that Spanish imitations have a unique style and are quite rare. I have a beautiful semis today featuring Saturn. This coin has excellent detail and a lovely patina. Compare to a few at CNG here. It would appear that this specimen is a die match to CNG 287 Lot 47, which sold for $160 before fees. Here are few at vcoins – nothing even close to the quality of this example. $135 (reduced from $150)

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    SPAIN, Imitations of Roman Republican coinage.
    Æ Semis, 5.7g, 23mm, 3h; 1st century BC.
    Obv.: Laureate head of Saturn right; S (mark of value) behind.
    Rev.: Prow left; S (mark of value) above.
    Reference: ACIP 2659; Burgos R44.

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    LOT 5. Here’s an instance where coin evidence aided the solution of an historical question. Vima Takto was long known as the “nameless king” of the Kushan Empire (see the next lot for a brief description of the dynasty), as his known coins displayed the inscription “King of Kings, Great Savior,” without giving a name. The discovery of this type, which links a name with the title, in addition to the Rabatak inscription (discovered in 1993), confirm that Vima Takto was indeed ΒΑΣΙΛΕΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΥΩΝ ΣΩΤΗΡ ΜΕΓΑΣ.

    I have a wonderful example of this type today, evincing a strong strike, very little wear, clean surfaces, and a pleasing patina. Here are a few at accoins for comparison. As a bonus, if you collect animals on ancient coins, here’s a rare type with camel! $30 (reduced from $35)

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    INDIA. Kushan Empire.
    Vima Takto (also known as 'Soter Megas'). Ca. A.D. 90-112.
    Æ drachm, 17mm, 4.0g, 6h.
    Obv.: Bull standing right with nandipada above; blundered Greek legend around.
    Rev.: Bactrian camel standing right, with monogram to right; Kharoshthi legend Maharajasa Rajadhirajasa Devaputrasa Vima Takha around.
    Reference: MACW ---; Senior B12.1.
    From the Theodosius Collection

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    LOT 6. Gallienus ruled jointly with his father Valerian from 253 to 260. Valerian was captured by Shapur I in the Battle of Edessa, at which point Gallienus became sole ruler, and the empire erupted into a civil war known as the Crisis of the Third Century. See also this succinct and informative documentary on YouTube. Although the emperor managed to defeat several eastern usurpers, he could not stop the formation of the breakaway Gallic Empire under the general Postumus.

    A curious phenomenon – the quality of imperial minting diminished greatly during this period, particularly during the rule of Gallienus. The reasons are unknown, but anyone who has collected the antoniniani of Gallienus and Salonina know just how awful the coinage can get: ragged flans, off-center and uneven strikes, poor artistry, etc., Provincial mints, however, continued to produce coins of high quality, like this tetradrachm of Alexandria. Here is the emperor with his characteristic neck beard on a coin with a lovely chocolate patina, well-struck on a thick flan, clean as a whistle. A real gem! Compare to retail offerings here. $115 (reduced from $145)

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    Gallienus, AD 253-268.
    Potin tetradrachm, 23mm, 10.6g, 11h; Alexandria mint, AD 255/6.
    Obv.: AVT K P LIK ΓAΛΛIHNOC CEB; Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
    Rev.: Eagle standing right holding wreath in beak, palm branch behind; L – IΓ (RY 13)
    Reference: Koln 2928, Dattari 5288.
    From the Sallent Collection, ex-Ken Dorney.

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    LOT 7. Here's a wonderful rarity, an argenteus of Galerius. Diocletian sought to revive silver coinage of high fineness during his monetary reforms, but it didn't stick. Silver was mostly hoarded and melted down during the late Roman Empire. After the antoninianus had become completely debased during the 3rd century, there was just no going back to good silver. So in addition to the fact that the argenteus denominations were not minted in huge numbers, many were also destroyed, making them quite scarce today (and also rather pricey in better grades).

    On this type, the four tetrarchs are seen in front of a city gate. These coins were struck on lighter flans than the denarii of past days, so they have the thinness and general fabric of later medieval bracteates, although they have the same diameter as denarii in general. Did I say pricey in better grades? Here is a handful at vcoins. $400 (reduced from $450)

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    Galerius as Caesar, AD 293-305
    AR Argenteus, 21mm, 2.7g, 12h; Rome, c. 294.
    Obv.: MAXIMIANVS CAES; Laureate head right.
    Rev.: VIRTVS MILITVM; The tetrarches sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets.
    Reference: RIC 29b.
    From the Sallent Collection, ex-JAZ Numismatics.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2021
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