A Type Set of US Dollar Designs

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by Jaelus, Nov 30, 2022.

  1. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    I have recently completed an important milestone for my $1 denomination type set, as I've now got examples of all the major design types. For small notes, I've expanded this to also include minor design variations as well.

    Large Size Notes:


    1862 $1 Legal Tender
    Design 4, Fr.16

    This first $1 note features Salmon P. Chase (Secretary of the Treasury under Lincoln from 1861-1864).

    Fr.16_Front.jpg
    Fr.16_Back.jpg

    1865 $1 National Bank Note (1st Charter)
    Design 99, Fr.380b


    This is a first charter National Bank Note issued by the Alton National Bank of the State of Illinois. These National Bank Notes were largely an attempt to remove private bank issued currency from circulation (among other reasons). These notes were also issued in 1875 with overprint and seal changes, but the design is the same. The back of the note is different per issuing state, however, collecting a full set in attractive grades would be prohibitively expensive.

    Fr.380b_Front.jpg
    Fr.380b_Back.jpg

    1869 $1 Legal Tender (Treasury Note)
    Design 5, Fr.18


    Known as a rainbow note, it's one of the most beautiful $1 types due to the vivid colors. I searched for several years to find an acceptable example with bold color.

    Fr.18_Front.jpg
    Fr.18_Back.jpg

    1875 $1 Legal Tender
    Design 6a, Fr.26


    This design type was also issued as series 1874 (Fr.19) and 1878 (Fr.27) with very minor differences. This bill was the introduction of the "sawhorse" reverse.

    Fr.26_Front.jpg
    Fr.26_Back.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2022
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  3. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    1880 $1 Legal Tender
    Design 6b, Fr.28


    The first of the three design types of 1880:

    Fr.28_Front.jpg
    Fr.28_Back.jpg

    1880 $1 Legal Tender
    Design 6c, Fr.31


    Design type 6c is significantly rarer than the others. The defining feature that made this a different design is that the serial numbers are printed in blue instead of red.

    Fr.31_Front.jpg
    Fr.31_Back.jpg

    1880 $1 Legal Tender
    Design 6d, Fr.35


    For the third 1880 design type, they kept the blue serials, but the position and style of the treasury seal was changed.

    Fr.35_Front.jpg
    Fr.35_Back.jpg

    1886 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 59, Fr.216


    Known as the ornate back type, this note can also be found with the smaller seal type used on the 1891 issue.

    Fr.216_Front.jpg
    Fr.216_Back.jpg

    1890 $1 Treasury Note (Coin Note)
    Design 85, Fr.348


    Known as the ornate back type, this note can also be found with the smaller seal type used on the 1891 issue. This treasury note was issued primarily to facilitate the free exchange between silver and gold coinage. The 1890 issue is scarce.

    Fr.348_Front.jpg
    Fr.348_Back.jpg
     
  4. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    1891 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 60, Fr.223


    The treasury seal was changed from the 1886 version, and the back was simplified to combat counterfeiting.

    Fr.223_Front.jpg
    Fr.223_Back.jpg

    1891 $1 Treasury Note (Coin Note)
    Design 86, Fr.351


    The treasury seal was changed from the 1890 version, and the back was simplified to combat counterfeiting. This type is significantly more common than the type of 1890.

    Fr.351_Front.jpg
    Fr.351_Back.jpg

    1896 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 61, Fr.225


    This silver certificate is a part of the Educational Series, so called due to the subject matter of the designs.

    Fr.225_Front.jpg
    Fr.225_Back.jpg

    1899 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 62, Fr.235


    This was my first large $1 note. I picked it up at a coin club meeting and it ended up kicking off this $1 type collection. It would be easy to pick up a better condition note, but for sentimental reasons I am keeping this as my type example.

    Fr.235_Front.jpg
    Fr.235_Back.jpg

    1917 $1 United States Note
    Design 6e, Fr.38m


    The last variation on design 6 was this 1917 US Note. A common type.

    Fr.38m_Front.jpg
    Fr.38m_Back.jpg
     
  5. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    1918 $1 Federal Reserve Bank Note
    Design 127, Fr.721


    Though Federal Reserve Notes were first issued in 1914, no $1 (or $2) bills were issued. This Federal Reserve Bank Note is the closest we get, though this is distinctly not a Federal Reserve Note. As a Federal Reserve Bank Note it is a National Currency issue of a specific Federal Reserve Bank (in this case the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond since I live in Virginia). These $1 notes were issued as a temporary measure to facilitate commerce when $1 silver certificates were being recalled from circulation.

    Fr.721_Front.jpg
    Fr.721_Back.jpg

    1923 $1 United States Note
    Design 7, Fr.40


    A somewhat less common US Note of 1923. A beautiful design very reminiscent of the small type $1 design that would follow it in 1928.

    Fr.40_Front.jpg
    Fr.40_Back.jpg

    1923 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 63, Fr.237


    This $1 Silver Certificate is very similar to the US Note above, and similar to the smaller silver certificates issued in 1928.

    Fr.237_Front.jpg
    Fr.237_Back.jpg
     
  6. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    Small Size Notes:

    1928 $1 United States Note
    Design 188, Fr.1500

    These notes were not initially issued and were instead shipped to Puerto Rico to meet the need for small currency where they circulated in 1948.

    Fr.1500_Front.jpg
    Fr.1500_Back.jpg


    1928A $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 195, Fr.1601


    This is the common First Legend variety of the 1928 $1 silver certificate, and the first $1 "Funnyback" note to circulate.

    Fr.1601_Front.jpg
    Fr.1601_Back.jpg

    1928E $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 195, Fr.1605


    This is an extremely rare Second Legend variety of the 1928 $1 silver certificate. Note the difference in the text over the blue treasury seal compared to the above example.

    Fr.1605_Front.jpg
    Fr.1605_Back.jpg

    1934 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 196, Fr.1606

    A beautiful design change occurred for series 1934, bringing it more in line with the look of the modern $1 FRN with the seal at right over the denomination.

    Fr.1606_Front.jpg
    Fr.1606_Back.jpg

    1935 $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 197, Fr.1607


    This general design was used for many of the following notes. Note the series is at top left on the front of the note. This was also the first note to adopt the general design of the modern $1 back.

    Fr.1607_Front.jpg
    Fr.1607_Back.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2022
  7. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    1935E $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 197, Fr.1614


    Compared to the series 1935 note above, you'll note the series was repositioned to underneath the treasury seal at right.

    Fr.1614_Front.jpg
    Fr.1614_Back.jpg

    1935A $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 236, Fr.2300


    These notes were issued in Hawaii in 1942 and were recalled after the war in 1946. They were issued as replacements for the circulating $1 silver certificates in Hawaii as these notes were easily identifiable and could be demonetized if Hawaii was captured by Japan.

    Fr.2300_Front.jpg
    Fr.2300_Back.jpg

    1935A $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 236, Fr.2306


    For the same reasons as the Hawaiian note above, these yellow seal notes were used to pay troops in North Africa and Italy.

    Fr.2306_Front.jpg
    Fr.2306_Back.jpg

    1935A $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 197, Fr.1609


    This is an experimental note issued in 1944 as part of a materials test in case the banknote paper supply was disrupted by the war. This note has a red R to signify it as a control note.

    Fr.1609_Front.jpg
    Fr.1609_Back.jpg

    1935A $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 197, Fr.1610


    This is an experimental note issued in 1944 as part of a materials test in case the banknote paper supply was disrupted by the war. This note has a red S to signify it as a special paper note.

    Fr.1610_Front.jpg
    Fr.1610_Back.jpg
     
  8. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    1935G $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 198, Fr.1617


    Though they did not increment the series for this change, this series 1935G note was issued in 1957 as it has the legend "In God We Trust" on the back.

    Fr.1617_Front.jpg
    Fr.1617_Back.jpg

    1957B $1 Silver Certificate
    Design 198, Fr.1621


    The same as the above, but updated to series 1957.

    Fr.1621_Front.jpg
    Fr.1621_Back.jpg

    1963 $1 Federal Reserve Note
    Design 214, Fr.1900-C


    This is the first $1 Federal Reserve Note. This type has the older treasury seal type with a curved shield and the text in Latin.

    Fr.1900-C_Front.jpg
    Fr.1900-C_Back.jpg

    1969 $1 Federal Reserve Note
    Design 214, Fr.1903-E


    Series 1969 updated the treasury seal to a more modern version with a straight edge shield and the text in English.

    Fr.1903-E_Front.jpg
    Fr.1903-E_Back.jpg

    1988A $1 Federal Reserve Note
    Design 214, Fr.1917-A


    This 1988A $1 is a Webb note, so called because it was printed on a Webb press. This used rollers instead of sheets, and so the position markings are different than sheet fed notes. The quality of the printing is also poorer, which led to the discontinuation of this experimental printing method.

    Fr.1917-A_Front.jpg
    Fr.1917-A_Back.jpg
     
  9. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    1988A $1 Federal Reserve Note
    Design 214, Fr.1916-K


    Last but not least, I include in my set a first year example of a note printed at Fort Worth. I thought it would be fun to select a star note from the Dallas Texas Federal Reserve Bank to make it a little more interesting.

    Fr.1916-K_Front.jpg
    Fr.1916-K_Back.jpg

    I hope you've enjoyed looking at this set of 33 $1 types. I will continue to work on this set to incorporate more minor design varieties for the large notes over the coming years.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2022
  10. LakeEffect

    LakeEffect Average Circulated Supporter

    Thanks for the great writeup. I've never been a collector of notes but your post makes it very intriguing. Good thing I don't have any disposable income. ;)

    Question, @Jaelus, about the 1896 silver certificate (the "educational" one) -- what was the criteria for the selection of the names that appear around the border?
     
  11. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    Thanks. I don't know the particulars of how those specific people were selected, but they were chosen for making substantial contributions to art, culture, and science.
     
    LakeEffect likes this.
  12. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Supporter! Supporter

    Wow. I could only hope to achieve what you have. I have many, but missing the more rare types, like the Fr-18 rainbow note, nor some of the others.
    Thank you for sharing and with great full image photos.
     
    Jaelus likes this.
  13. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    Thanks. I've had the small notes set above completed for a while, but I just completed the large note designs set. I was trying to pick up one or two notes for that set every year, but I was so close I just bit the bullet and picked up the last couple to complete it.
     
    Mountain Man likes this.
  14. Hommer

    Hommer Curator of Semi Precious Coinage Supporter

    That is quite an accomplishment and a great collection, congratulations.
     
    Jaelus likes this.
  15. kanga

    kanga 65 Year Collector Supporter

    Nice.
    VERY nice!

    It's the sort of thing that I've been contemplating for the last year or so.
     
    Jaelus likes this.
  16. BurrosCoins

    BurrosCoins Well-Known Member

    Impressive collection. Thanks for sharing.
     
    Jaelus likes this.
  17. IrishLuck

    IrishLuck Well-Known Member

    This is fantastic!
    Heck, I'm going to use this as a reference.
     
    Jaelus likes this.
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