A joke and a coin

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by Ryro, Aug 6, 2020.

  1. Ryro

    Ryro You'll never be lovelier than you are now... Supporter

    facebook_1596255012462_6695178783791676815_131364759042385.jpg

    I love this coin for many reasons. Foremost, I recieved it just before my twins were born:
    20190326_140033_F47E0D07-CBA7-4B5E-AA2E-A22E48A4E84D-406-000000AF377E4A91.png
    THRACIAN ISLANDS. Thasos. Ca. 463-411 BC. AR 1/16 stater or obol (0.49 gm). VF. Two dolphins swimming in opposite directions; pellets around / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 9. SNG Copenhagen 1020-1.

    And that's it. If you have a joke, a coin and wanted to share why you like the coin that'd be cool:cigar: or at least a joke and a coin is the minimum cover charge... free on ladies nights;)
     
    Cheech9712, DonnaML, Ajax and 40 others like this.
  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. Clavdivs

    Clavdivs Supporter! Supporter

    That's awesome!!
     
    Ryro likes this.
  4. Bing

    Bing Illegitimi non carborundum Supporter

    :rolleyes:
     
    Ryro likes this.
  5. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    LOL... I used to throw discus in Track during High School. My friends and I were just that stooopid during those years, that we would had done that. Unfortunately, (fortunately!) there weren’t many, if any dishwashers in our area growing up. LOL, yeah, we would had done that.

    I threw shot put, too, and Brian Oldfield was an inspiration by combining the form of the discus body spin to shot put. Purdy cool dude.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
    DonnaML, galba68, Theodosius and 9 others like this.
  6. ancient coin hunter

    ancient coin hunter I dig ancient coins...

    A Roman soldier comes home after a tough day dealing with robbers and malefactors...

    His wife asks"How did the crucifixion go?"

    "Nailed it"
     
    TIF, DonnaML, Kentucky and 14 others like this.
  7. Gavin Richardson

    Gavin Richardson Well-Known Member

    A Headmaster at a fancy British boarding school once sent a letter to parents announcing a steep tuition increase. The Headmaster had intended to announce the new rate as a yearly payment, but instead of telling parents that they had to pay per annum, he wrote per anum.

    One father, whose Latin was better than the Headmaster’s, wrote back stating that, if it was okay with the Headmaster, he’d just like to keep paying “through the nose” like always.

    SHEKEL OF TYRE 1.jpg

    Here’s a Temple tax shekel that was paid per annum (and arguably per anum) to the Romans in the first century.
     
    TIF, TheRed, octavius and 18 others like this.
  8. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    Appropriate for these times...

    upload_2020-8-7_9-7-47.png


    You can see that SOL is wearing his MASK...
    upload_2020-8-7_9-8-34.png
    RR Mussidius Longus 42 BCE AR Den Rad Sol Platform CLOACIN S 494 Cr494-42
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
    TIF, DonnaML, galba68 and 16 others like this.
  9. medoraman

    medoraman Supporter! Supporter

    Very scarce little coin. A friend from my coin club is literally THE world expert on Thasos coinage and has the largest collection in the world of them, greater than any museum holdings. Very tough coin to find, congratulations.
     
  10. Pavlos

    Pavlos You pick out the big men. I'll make them brave!

    As a Greek in a foreign country I have heard already tens of times the joke about me throwing plates hehe, it still stays funny though.
    Nice coin Ryro! I really enjoy the coinage of Thasos (like many other Greek Islands), yours is a clear example.

    Here a quite rare and obscure fraction from Thasos during the Hellenistic times:
    [​IMG]
    Islands off Thrace, Thasos. AR Hemidrachm (Early 2nd century B.C)
    Obverse:
    Head of bearded Dionysos to right, wearing ivy wreath.
    Reverse: ΘΑΣΙ ΩΝ Club and legend within laurel wreath.
    Reference: Le Rider, Thasiennes 48. SNG Copenhagen 1036. SNG Lockett 1232.
    1.69g; 15mm
     
    TIF, DonnaML, galba68 and 12 others like this.
  11. ancientone

    ancientone Well-Known Member

    "An intellectual came to check in on a friend who was seriously ill. When the man's wife said that he had 'departed,' the intellectual replied: 'When he arrives back, will you tell him that I stopped by?'"

    Philogelos
    (meaning "Laughter Lover"), a Greek anthology of more than 200 jokes from the 4th or 5th century.

    Nice tiny AR Ryro!


    thasos2.jpg Thrace, Islands off. Thasos. 200-1 BC. Æ 20mm. Diademed & draped bust of Artemis right, bow & quiver over shoulder / QASIWN, nude Herakles standing right, drawing bow about to shoot an arrow, lionskin around neck.
     
    TIF, DonnaML, galba68 and 12 others like this.
  12. Mr.Q

    Mr.Q Well-Known Member

    Funny and educational at the same time great. Thanks everyone
     
    +VGO.DVCKS and Ryro like this.
  13. Ryro

    Ryro You'll never be lovelier than you are now... Supporter

    Thanks for joining in and sharing all the fun so far!
    Here's another knee slappa and a beauty:

    an-ancient-greek-walks-into-his-tailors-shop-with-a-41482256.png
    It's from Makedon, holed and is an ex @Bing ... need I say more about why its awesome?
    20190525_161014_IMG_1935.PNG
    MACEDONIA, Eion
    AR Trihemiobol
    OBVERSE: Goose standing right, head reverted, lizard downward to left above
    REVERSE: Quadripartite incuse square
    Struck at Eion, 460-400 BC
    .66g, 11mm
    SNG ANS 273-284ʺ

    Former CT coin from CT rockstar @Bing
     
    TIF, DonnaML, galba68 and 14 others like this.
  14. juris klavins

    juris klavins Well-Known Member

    Bowling for drachmas :D

    104019338_701610180405600_9093707371193730626_n.jpg

    (From NGC Ancients article) :

    [​IMG]

    It is only natural that coinage would be struck to commemorate this important religious, political, artistic, and athletic event. One example is this rare silver stater, thought to have been struck in the later 460s B.C., thus probably for the 79th or the 80th Olympiad. It features on the obverse an eagle flying left, and on the reverse Nike running with a wreath, presumably to crown an Olympic victor.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
    TIF, DonnaML, TheRed and 6 others like this.
  15. Limes

    Limes Supporter! Supporter

    Cool coin. Don't have a coin to share, so how about a joke then, which is actually from the Roman times and obviously is more fitting for that time:

    One man complains to another: “The slave you sold me died!” “By the gods! – the other replies – “During the time he was in my service, he never did such a thing!"

    Mary Beard wrote a book about Roman jokes, called Laughter in Ancient Rome. I don't have it though.
     
    TIF, DonnaML, Theodosius and 5 others like this.
  16. Pishpash

    Pishpash Supporter! Supporter

    Thanks for the reminder, I have it on kindle.
     
    Ryro likes this.
  17. Alegandron

    Alegandron "ΤΩΙ ΚΡΑΤΙΣΤΩΙ..." ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ, June 323 BCE Supporter

    A man walks into a bar in Ancient Rome
    The bartender asks him how many bottles of wine he wants and he holds up a peace sign. The bartender brings him five bottles.

    This is for @kevin McGonigal ... :)

    upload_2020-8-7_13-53-55.png
    RR Anon after 211 BCE AR Quinarius 2.12g Helmeted hd Roma - Dioscuri riding Cr 68-2b was 44-6 RSC 3 ex Clain-Stefanelli
     
    TIF, DonnaML, Theodosius and 7 others like this.
  18. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    For the jokes so far, that one might take the prize. With serious competition!!!
     
    Ryro likes this.
  19. +VGO.DVCKS

    +VGO.DVCKS Well-Known Member

    ...Sorry, this is about a whole different period (but it's original!).
    What made Martin Luther so cantankerous in his old age?
    He had a Diet of Worms.
     
    DonnaML and Ryro like this.
  20. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member Supporter

    Check your facts. The Temple tax was a half shekel and paid to the priests at the temple in Jerusalem, not to the Romans.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_tax

    The tax is set down in Exodus 30:13 a few thousand years before there were Romans. There were taxes to the Romans but the one called Temple Tax was to support the operation of the Temple.

    There is a Bible story where Jesus tells Peter to catch a fish and, in it, find a whole shekel which would pay the tax for them both. There is some discussion as to what tax was meant in the passage but the amount mentioned matched the Temple Tax of Exodus. I have never understood why there are so many more whole shekels today than halves. Of course most were used in places other than Judaea.
     
    Gavin Richardson, +VGO.DVCKS and Ryro like this.
  21. Gavin Richardson

    Gavin Richardson Well-Known Member

    Ok, ok. But was the joke at least funny?
     
    DonnaML, Ryro, Alegandron and 2 others like this.
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page