A Dull Dupondius?

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by David Atherton, Jan 15, 2021.

  1. David Atherton

    David Atherton Flavian Fanatic Supporter

    Not rare. Not stylish. And as Doug would say, the reverse features someone just 'standing around'. So, why did I acquire it (other than I lacked this RIC number)? Well, it's nicely struck, in good condition (rare for bronzes), and I have a weakness for Titus. Oh, and it was fairly cheap.

    V830.jpg Titus as Caesar [Vespasian]
    Æ Dupondius, 13.68g
    Rome mint, 75 AD
    Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS IIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
    Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
    RIC 830 (C). BMC 715A. BNC 741.
    Acquired from London Ancient Coins, January 2021.

    Felicitas symbolising prosperity and abundance was one of the more common types struck during Vespasian's reign, often shared with Titus Caesar. This common dupondius was struck in 75, the year of the Temple of Peace dedication.

    The history a common coin like this has is much richer than the rarities we tend to seek out. It's anything but dull to me.

    Please post your 'dull' coins.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. Orfew

    Orfew Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus Supporter

    Let us see...you call yourself a Flavian Fanatic and this is a coin of Titus...HMMMM...not enough. Okay It is a really interesting portrait of Titus on a coin of Titus...Okay now? JK my friend I quite like this one actually.
     
    Jay GT4 and David Atherton like this.
  4. Jay GT4

    Jay GT4 Well-Known Member

    For a coin proclaiming Titus as the harbinger of Public happiness he doesn't look that happy... :)
     
    Scipio, Lueds, cmezner and 3 others like this.
  5. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    Very nice, @David Atherton. Pleasing patina.

    Here's a dull Felicitas publica:

    [​IMG]
    Julia Mamaea, AD 222-235.
    Roman orichalcum sestertius, 19.91 g, 29.2 mm, 12 h.
    Rome, issue 9A, AD 228.
    Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust, right.
    Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA S C, Felicitas standing front, head left, legs crossed, holding caduceus transversely to left, and resting left arm on low column.
    Refs: RIC 676; BMCRE 487-92; Cohen 21; RCV 8228.
     
  6. David Atherton

    David Atherton Flavian Fanatic Supporter

     
    DonnaML, Jay GT4 and Roman Collector like this.
  7. Jay GT4

    Jay GT4 Well-Known Member

    A year later he still doesn't look too happy...
    TitusFelicitas.jpg
    T CAESAR IMP COS V
    Radiate head right

    FELICITAS PVBLICA
    Felicitas, wearing long dress and cloak, standing facing, diademed head turned left, holding cornucopiae in her left hand, laurel branch in her raised right hand. SC in field

    Rome, 76 AD

    12.17g

    RIC 909 Vespasian (R)

    Rare.

    Ex-ANE

    Gemini notes: "COS V bronzes of Titus are scarce: only one such As, no dupondii or sestertii, in the BM collection by 1976."
     
  8. Orfew

    Orfew Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus Supporter

    And that is just...
     
    David Atherton and Jay GT4 like this.
  9. Shea19

    Shea19 Supporter! Supporter

    This bronze from Antioch is my favorite “dull” Flavian bronze. Pretty boring reverse on these Antioch types, but I love the different portrait styles and always liked the Domitian portrait on this one.

    5EB3254F-BA00-4C1B-9943-8BA1EA0A3E3E.jpeg
    Domitian, as Caesar. Antioch. AE 'Semis' (21 mm, 7.26g), DOMITI[ANVS CAE]SAR Laureate head of Domitian to left. Rev. Large S•C within wreath. McAlee 403e. RPC II 2017
     
  10. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    This one appears to be an obverse die match to yours:

    Domitian semis Antioch.jpg
     
  11. gsimonel

    gsimonel Supporter! Supporter

    Hard to get much duller than this one:
    [​IMG]
    Typical "Victory advancing left with wreath and palm" reverse type, seen on millions of bronze coins of Valentinian I and Valens.

    Something unusual about this one, though.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page