74cc ? Trade Dollar

Discussion in 'US Coins Forum' started by COOPER12, May 26, 2022.

  1. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    32B1734E-986F-4CEC-8C3B-C8E7AF4EB63C.jpeg FCF4D916-8E84-4030-935D-82B9923D74FB.jpeg 87566C8C-7A9A-4F03-8F36-5D9BB01245B1.jpeg So I just got this raw 1874 cc Trade Dollar with one chopmark.
    I prefer graded trade dollars .
    This one tested good on the sigma and is pre 1900 90% silver and weight 26.93 grams for a worn dollar seems good. Coin has a little pvc which can be removed but the cc does not look exactly like any I have seen . It does not look altered though. Seller has return privy if unopened which I’m debating sending it back for that reason but otherwise a nice circulated example.
     
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  3. mbogoman

    mbogoman Member

    No worries, looks real to me. There are at least 6 different CC mint marks for 1874. Acetone will take care of the PVC.
     
  4. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster Member of the ANA since 1982

    [QUOTE="COOPER12, post: 8357578, member:
    ......This one tested good on the sigma and is pre 1900 90% silver and weight 26.93 grams for a worn dollar seems good....[/QUOTE]

    How were you able to determine that the composition was Pre-1900?
     
  5. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    How were you able to determine that the composition was Pre-1900?[/QUOTE]
    sigma tester said it. Seller sent a pic of it on there since im always questioning ungraded Trade Dollars that I can not see.
     
  6. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster Member of the ANA since 1982

    sigma tester said it. Seller sent a pic of it on there since im always questioning ungraded Trade Dollars that I can not see.[/QUOTE]
    A sigma tester only measures the resistivity of a sample and compares it to a programmed "standard". Basically it's a go/no go gage. With all of the compositional variability due to remelting old coinage, and minor impurities in the non silver part, etc, I would think that the error bars on pre 1900 vs post 1900 would be too large to provide a meaningful result. No problem with the 90% silver part, but classifying by century? Seems like a huge stretch. Either Sigma Analytics is making some big claims, or someone is misinterpreting the testing capabilities

    BTW: None of this is germane to the question in the OP. Just trying to understand this particular statement
     
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  7. Omegaraptor

    Omegaraptor Gobrecht/Longacre Enthusiast

    I am not an expert but your 1874-CC Trade Dollar seems to match this PCGS coin on mintmark position.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    My coins mint mark seems chunkier than any I have seen but it’s in a familiar spot.
     
  9. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    A sigma tester only measures the resistivity of a sample and compares it to a programmed "standard". Basically it's a go/no go gage. With all of the compositional variability due to remelting old coinage, and minor impurities in the non silver part, etc, I would think that the error bars on pre 1900 vs post 1900 would be too large to provide a meaningful result. No problem with the 90% silver part, but classifying by century? Seems like a huge stretch. Either Sigma Analytics is making some big claims, or someone is misinterpreting the testing capabilities

    BTW: None of this is germane to the question in the OP. Just trying to understand this particular statement[/QUOTE]
    I am not sure how they can tell but I’ve seen it showing this on a few different results from different people testing different dollars. ED620D77-424B-469E-8A3A-508D487E2CD8.png
     
  10. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster Member of the ANA since 1982

    I am not sure how they can tell but I’ve seen it showing this on a few different results from different people testing different dollars. View attachment 1483331 [/QUOTE]
    They must have done a heck of a lot of statistical work or are just assuming post 1900 is primarily copper
     
    COOPER12 likes this.
  11. KBBPLL

    KBBPLL Well-Known Member

    I've seen the "pre-1900" thing on other images of Sigma results and am curious if anyone has an explanation. Canada switched from .925 silver to .80 in 1920 - what does it read on those?? I'm not aware of any country switching silver content at exactly 1900.

    Edit: OK, I answered my own question. You select what to test for. This is from their user guide.

    "5. Select the alloy using the left and right arrow keys.
    a. Gold- lists the following alloys: Pure .999+, 91.7% 22K bal Cu,
    90% bal Cu, American Eagle, Krugerrand, and 98.6%.
    b. Silver- lists the following alloys: 99.99% Pure, 99.9% Pure,
    92.5% Sterling, 90%US pre 1900, 90%US pre 1945, 90%
    Coin 1960, 96% Britannia, and 80% Canadian.
    c. Other- lists the following: Platinum, Palladium, Rhodium,
    Copper, and Calibrator.
    d. Bullion- lists the following: Silver .9999, Gold .9999,
    Platinum, and Palladium."

    In the notes section, it says

    "Morgan and Trade dollars should be measured on the Silver-90%US pre1900
    range. Peace dollars and walking Liberty half dollars should be measured on the Silver-90%US pre1945 range."
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2022
  12. COOPER12

    COOPER12 Well-Known Member

    I ended up sending it back since by the time it gets graded I would be out of luck if it was not verifiable.
     
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