2019D doubling on the R..anyone know about this?

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Ben crowder, May 23, 2019.

  1. Ben crowder

    Ben crowder New Member

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  3. R_rabbit

    R_rabbit Well-Known Member

    Hi:)

    Welcome to ct!
    Imho, a clear picture would be most helpful.
    To determine what you may or may not have.
     
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  4. Ben crowder

    Ben crowder New Member

    Thanks, I will try to get a better one posted
     
  5. Ben crowder

    Ben crowder New Member

  6. R_rabbit

    R_rabbit Well-Known Member

    :)
    Imho, it’s a slight bit mad( misaligned die strike) which caused that extra lip on the R.
     
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  7. Ben crowder

    Ben crowder New Member

    Thanks for the information, greatly appreciated. Is there any collector value with this kind of error? Worth adding to my collection or no?
     
  8. Seattlite86

    Seattlite86 Outspoken Member

    I do my best not to unnecessarily correct people on here, but @R_rabbit has led you astray. A misaligned die would not cause that. It’s also hardly misaligned. Please take a photo from the other side of the coin to get the camera closer to the R. Most likely, it’s just plate blistering, which has no extra value and is caused by improper plating of the copper on the zinc core.
     
  9. paddyman98

    paddyman98 No Common Cents! Supporter

    The response you gave is incorrect. Misaligned Die strikes would not cause that issue. Where did you hear about that?

    It's just a plating issue.. No actual doubling.

    @Ben crowder no need for 2 threads for the same coin.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
  10. Ben crowder

    Ben crowder New Member

    It’s hard to see in the pic but it looks like middle of the new R is inside the original R as we

    Thanks for the info, I’ll see if I can get a better picture.
     
  11. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    It's a thin copper coating on top of zinc. What you see is caused by the copper plating. We never had this problem until 1982 when the Cent composition changed from copper to zinc.

    No added value on this as they are very common.

    Welcome to CT.
     
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  12. Ben crowder

    Ben crowder New Member

    Thanks and appreciate the information.
     
  13. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    You're welcome.
     
  14. R_rabbit

    R_rabbit Well-Known Member

    :)
    Sorry,My mistake on the R.
    It was difficult to tell in the picture when I first looked.

    Imho, I have been trying to studying mad for a while.
    It seems that there is some doubling in a mad strike. Perhaps it is caused from the back stroke of the hammer ? Leaving a slight die deterioration look.
     
  15. Seattlite86

    Seattlite86 Outspoken Member

    I hate to do this publicly... but MAD strikes have absolutely nothing to do with doubling. I don’t know what you think you mean by “backstroke” of a die or how you connect that to die deterioration, but it’s clear you’re mixing up a few concepts.
     
  16. R_rabbit

    R_rabbit Well-Known Member

    :)
    Imho, as long as you don’t get mad then it’s okay;)
     
  17. Brina

    Brina Active Member

    Plating blister most likely...
     
  18. R_rabbit

    R_rabbit Well-Known Member

    :)
    Imho, from my experience of looking at misaligned die strikes. I have found that. They can be accountable for some forms of doubling.

    Edited:
    So is this cause in part by deterioration Or caused by the hammer on release of strike?
     
  19. Seattlite86

    Seattlite86 Outspoken Member

    I’m not sure what MAD coins you have been looking at, but that is an incorrect conclusion.

    The shift in the hammer die in this explanation has to do with immediately after a strike, and not with the die being installed misaligned prior to. The shift is minuscule, causing minor machine doubling.
    http://www.error-ref.com/machine-doubling/
     
  20. R_rabbit

    R_rabbit Well-Known Member

    :)
    So ,thank you.I was correct. It’s from the vibration on release of the Hammer Not on the deterioration.
     
  21. Seattlite86

    Seattlite86 Outspoken Member

    No, you were not correct. A MAD involves a die that is improperly installed BEFORE the strike. It simply means the die was misaligned and the strike is not perfectly centered. No doubling involved.

    Machine die doubling can be caused by several things, one of which is the hammer die shifting AFTER the strike.

    Also, the mark above the R does not display machine doubling, such is flat and shelf like.

    I’m sorry, but the further you push this, the more you show you don’t know what you’re talking about...
     
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