2014 Arches Quarter, no clad at all.

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Marc Peagler, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. Marc Peagler

    Marc Peagler New Member

    Has anyone seen something like this before? This is the only one I have seen like it.
     

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  3. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    It's been plated as a novelty item.


    It has the outer clad layers and copper core,
    you just can see them due to the plating of it.
     
    Randy Abercrombie and Kentucky like this.
  4. Pete Apple

    Pete Apple Active Member

    Silver Quarter -> how to ID

    When a quarter which is expected to be cupronickel clad is found without a visible copper core, when viewed from the edge, the question becomes “Is it silver?”

    A few 1965 silver quarters do exist, but are quite rare: https://www.coinworld.com/news/prec...steve-roach-numismatics-collecting-hobby.html

    A 1970-D Silver Clad Quarter also exists with the copper core not visible on the edge.

    https://coins.ha.com/itm/errors/197...eaned-ngc-details-xf-breen-4457/a/1231-3499.s

    Most likely the quarter has either been plated as a novelty item after it left the mint, or a dull punch has pulled the cupronickel cladding over the edge while punching blanks from the coil.

    The weight of a Silver Clad Quarter, adjusted for tolerance, is too close to the weight of a Nickel Clad Quarter, adjusted for tolerance, to identify the type of cladding.

    Quarter 1947-1964 = 6.250 g +/- 0.194 g (900 Ag 100 Cu)

    Weight of Clad quarter 1965 – to present = 5.670 g +/- 0.227 g (75 Cu, 25 Ni on pure Cu)

    (1976 = 5.750 g +/- 0.200 g - 40% silver clad)

    A specific gravity test can tell, but it is difficult to run one accurately. Specific Gravity Test. 90% Silver = SG 10.34; 40% Silver = SG 9.53 Cupro Nickel clad = SG 8.92 Copper Cent = SG 8.83; Zinc Cent = SG 7.17; Steel cent = 7.7

    Here are instructions about how to perform a specific gravity test:

    http://lincolncentsonline.com/Copper Or Zinc.html

    Another alternative to determine metal content is via an XRF Scan.
     
  5. Autoturf

    Autoturf Well-Known Member

    I see a mintmark but the picture is too blurry, looks like a D, however the other possible thing I can think of is a silver proof, witch it has no indication of. there is no cameo finish present. and it would be an S mintmark. its likely plated as others have stated.
     
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