2006 penny pulls on magnet

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by Wilddavy, Oct 22, 2019.

  1. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    I thought it been weathered, but looks diff from the rest I seen well I tried the mag to it and it pulls in it so not sure what's y'alls thoughts.
     

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  3. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    If a magnet attracts it it is almost certainly nickel plated.
     
    Wilddavy likes this.
  4. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Looks plated.
     
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  5. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Old magicians coin that got lost in change by a magician. I have a magic trick using a special plated Cent and a magnet.
     
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  6. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    What's that mean plated ? Like with what. I guess
     
  7. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    To funny my wife said the same thing lol
     
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  8. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    By the way.. A magnet would pull on a metal that is ferromagnetic.. Not the other way around.
     
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  9. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    Man I tell ya what I love about this group keep on learning everyday.
    Mr obvious lol.
     
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  10. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Zinc Cents are plated with a thin layer of copper. Reprocessed 1943 Cents are plated. You can take a copper cent and apply nickel to the coin. Now it's plated.
     
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  11. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    I see. Thanks.
     
  12. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    The coin was struck on the wrong planchet
    But thanks for help. Lol
     
  13. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    See post #2.

    If it was struck on a wrong planchet, what planchet and where did it come from? No other US coin around that year is magnetic, and the mint has not struck coins for other countries since 1984 (except the iceland 1000 Kr in 2000, MUCH too large) This make the chance of a wrong planchet almost zero, and the chance of it being nickel plated many orders of magnitude more likely.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2019
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  14. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    Look on error coins .com it shows you I will forward a email address and show you.
     
  15. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    Try this site it mite help you like it did me The one in the picture is a 1997. Weird huh real head scratcher since they stoped in 84 you say lol.
     

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  16. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    @Wilddavy

    If you're certain it was struck on the wrong planchet, why didn't you provide the weight?? That is the quickest and easiest way to prove/disprove wrong planchet errors. But since it's magnetic, it can't be a US coin as @Conder101 said. The pic you show in post 14 isn't a coin struck on a foreign planchet. It actually looks like an unplated cent, but I suppose it could be a dime planchet (they didn't provide the weights or details of the pictured coin. What help is that?) So Conder101's comment isn't really that much of a head scratcher, is it?

    This issue of Mint error news has a link to a large spread sheet with every foreign coin type made at the US mint. It also lists weights, compositions and size. You can do some research to see if there are any that match the size and weight of your coin and were struck near 2006 or shortly before. BTW: I'm sure that someone with as much experience as Conder101 is familiar with this link

    https://minterrornews.com/news-5-13-03-foreigners_in_the_mint.html
     
  17. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    That article you point to has a strange anomaly to it

    but first
    (1) if you read the entire article, for instance the last paragraph, you'll see what the other posters are asking ..
    (2) the article you refer to on https://varietyerrors.com/wrong-planchet-coin-error-price-guide/, lifted the image with the 1997 D and 1961 D from CoinTalk from Feb 2013.
    =====
    upload_2019-10-25_9-29-53.png
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    The 1997 D and 1961 D from CoinTalk from Feb 2013 as is seen in this CT thread
    https://www.cointalk.com/threads/19...g-size-un-plated-wrong-planchet-ideas.222451/
    =====
    upload_2019-10-25_9-30-17.png
    =====

    Thus the article's image of the 1997 D and 1961 D cents have no correlation to the article. And is just plain bizarre @GDJMSP
    And the article only identifies cents up to 1965 on their chart.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
  18. frech001

    frech001 New but Old

    More likely it was iron plated as the coin shows some evidence of rust.

    The very next video shows nickel plating. Fun with chemistry.
     
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  19. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    They don't specifically say it is on a different planchet, give a weight or any other information. To me it looks like it is slightly larger than the 1961 but the lettering is all the way out by the rim. That wouldn't be possible

    If it was on a dime planchet it would be smaller and part of the lettering would be off the coin

    Thank you clawcoin for tracking down the source of the image. No plating, larger than it should be, a "Texas cent" (Regular cent put between tow pieces of leather and beaten, it causes the coin to increase in size proportionally. And for some reason when done with zinc cents causes them to lose their plating.)
     
    Wilddavy likes this.
  20. Wilddavy

    Wilddavy Active Member

    all i am saying is the coin is on the wrong planchet but i do thank you for your time and know it all knowledge, happy hunting to all god bless
     
  21. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

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