2005 Copper/Silver Dime

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Jay Guest, May 18, 2020.

  1. Jay Guest

    Jay Guest New Member

    I was told to start a new thread here and give you the story. I was going through some change and found at first what I thought was a coin from another country because it didn’t sit right with my pennies or dimes! The raised edges are what set it off in my fingers. When looking at it, I noticed it was a dime but when I looked at it on edge I could see a definite copper side and silver side of the coin even though both faces appear silver. Can anyone help me out with what I have? I will post pictures below.
     
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  3. Jay Guest

    Jay Guest New Member

    5DA612B1-5F8B-4065-82DD-3CDA68293F41.jpeg F9865D30-849C-456B-A752-33CECF203097.jpeg 9BC0BE46-DB64-4F02-B40C-CF0452FC987E.jpeg DF77BD73-D6C7-43CB-B2F2-DA59EA544F0D.jpeg
    Here it is. First two show both silver sides. Third shows the copper and silver on edge. Last shows the raised edge of the coin.
     
  4. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    That would be a spooned or hammered edge dime..
    Not a Mint Error :(
    FLQKH55FRXW6RZD.MEDIUM.gif
    Just damage.

    Clad coins are Cupro-Nickel clad over a Copper core.
    When the alteration is done you will see that effect on the edge of a previous reeded coin.
     
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  5. Jay Guest

    Jay Guest New Member

    You’ve got a gify for that....wow
     
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  6. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    Many times people don't understand what we are trying to tell them. Visuals help!
     
  7. Jay Guest

    Jay Guest New Member

    It was a joke but seriously thanks for the help.
     
  8. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Someone was attempting to make a ring out of it.
     
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  9. SorenCoins

    SorenCoins Well-Known Member

    Nice GIF for that!

    Sometimes coins that get stuck in a washer / dryer take on this appearance too. I agree that it was being turned into a ring, since it looks like it's been polished.
     
  10. mikediamond

    mikediamond Coin Collector

    It wasn't spooned. There are no percussion marks. But it was altered outside the Mint. It was rolled and squeezed in the horizontal plane by some kind of mechanical device. I have seen many similar alterations over the years.
     
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  11. SorenCoins

    SorenCoins Well-Known Member

    Interesting. When you say it was rolled and squeezed about its horizontal plane, do you mean one that is parallel to the face of the coin, or perpendicular? Hopefully that makes sense.
     
  12. mikediamond

    mikediamond Coin Collector

    Parallel to the face of the coin. Sort of like the upset mill works -- pressure is applied to the edge of the coin as it rolls within the device.
     
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  13. rascal

    rascal Well-Known Member

    I have a few coins like this and I always thought they would be impossible to be spooned coins and Mikes reply makes sense. I believe what he said about the spooned coins having percussion marks, These coins have a perfect smooth widened out rim.
     
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  14. SorenCoins

    SorenCoins Well-Known Member

    Very interesting. It also seems different than the typical washer / dryer coins since those have mushy details. Now, I wonder why one would do this with a mechanized apparatus. Perhaps to make higher quality coin rings that don't show any percussive marks.
     
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  15. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    Occasionally, something like this posted and gets lumped into the "spooned" category even though it's obvious it didn't occur from a manual process. Equipment similar to an upset mill makes a lot of sense, but at the end of the day, it's still damage.

    Even though it's not technically correct, I don't have a problem calling it spooned. Same way with "Dryer Coins". Maybe they were tumbled between the drums of a dryer, and maybe they tumbled in something different. There are so many ways a coin can be damaged, trying to determine the exact cause may be an exercise in futility. Just my thoughts
     
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  16. SorenCoins

    SorenCoins Well-Known Member

    Right, I agree. I think being able to attribute the general process that produced the damage is more valuable than the specific instrument used to carry that process out. Maybe someone used a hammer instead of a spoon, but it is still done by hitting the edge of the coin with a harder object. I find various forms of post-mint damage so interesting sometimes.
     
  17. mikediamond

    mikediamond Coin Collector

    I've seen many similar alterations over the years. I'm not sure what mechanical device is used or whether it's hand-cranked or motor-driven.
     
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